Special Issue "Quality of Life in Orthopedic Diseases"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
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Guest Editor
Associate Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via Álvaro Del Portillo, 200, 00128 Roma
Interests: Sports traumatology of; Arthroscopic surgery of shoulder, knee and ankle; Replacement surgery of shoulder, knee and hip
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Prof. Vicenzo Denaro
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Guest Editor
Full Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via Álvaro Del Portillo, 200, 00128 Roma, Italy
Interests: spine surgery (scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, spinal disc herniation, myelopathy); hip, knee, and shoulder replacement surgery; foot surgery; hand surgery
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The importance to assess health status in patients with orthopedic diseases is well known. To date, health status can be evaluated by both subjective and objective methods. The monitoring of psychological and physiological status plays a crucial role in defining the patients’ clinical pictures. Subjective evaluations mainly focus on patient’s perceptions about e.g., emotional status, mental stress, level of satisfaction. Objective evaluations may include measures of strength, range of motion or vital signs such as respiratory rate, heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure. Choosing the most adequate evaluation methods, for a specific orthopedic disease, is decisive to avoid misleading outcomes. To what extent psychological and physiological factors may contribute to define the level of quality of life is still a wide discussion topic. The special issue aims in discussing the current methodologies to assess quality of life in patients with orthopedic diseases.

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
Prof. Vicenzo Denaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • orthopedic diseases
  • quality of life
  • evaluation
  • stress
  • satisfaction
  • emotional status

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Open AccessReview
A Historical Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials in Rotator Cuff Tears
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6863; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186863 - 20 Sep 2020
Abstract
Background and objectives: Our research aimed to evaluate the quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) linked to rotator cuff (RC) tears. The present study analyzed factors connected to the quality of the RCTs and trends in the quality of reporting through [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Our research aimed to evaluate the quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) linked to rotator cuff (RC) tears. The present study analyzed factors connected to the quality of the RCTs and trends in the quality of reporting through time. Materials and Methods: The online databases used to search all RCTs on the topic of RC surgery completed until March 2020 were PubMed and Ovid (MEDLINE). The quality of reporting was evaluated using the modified Coleman methodology score (MCMS) and the consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT). Results: The online search found 957 articles. Finally, 183 studies were included in the quantitative synthesis. A total of 97 (53%) of 183 studies had a level of evidence I and 86 (47%) of 183 studies had a level of evidence II, according to the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). A statistically significant difference in MCMS between articles written before 2010 and articles written after 2010 was found. Articles written after 2010 had, on average, the highest Coleman score. The average number of CONSORT checklist items for each article across all analyzed RCTs was 21.67. The 37 studies completed up to 2010 averaged a number of checklist items of 19.97 and the studies completed between 2011 and 2019 averaged a number of checklist items of 22.10. A statistically significant difference in the number of checklist items between articles written before 2010 and articles written after 2010 was found. Articles written after 2010 had on average more checklist items. However, low correlation (0.26) between the number of checklist items for each article and the respective Coleman score was found. On the other hand, articles with the CONSORT diagram had a significantly high Coleman score. Conclusions: An improvement in the quantity and quality of RCTs relating to RC surgery over the analyzed period was found. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quality of Life in Orthopedic Diseases)
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