Special Issue "New Frontiers in Rehabilitation"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
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Guest Editor
Associate Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via Álvaro Del Portillo, 200, 00128 Roma
Interests: Sports traumatology of; Arthroscopic surgery of shoulder, knee and ankle; Replacement surgery of shoulder, knee and hip
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Prof. Vicenzo Denaro
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Guest Editor
Full Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via Álvaro Del Portillo, 200, 00128 Roma, Italy
Interests: spine surgery (scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, spinal disc herniation, myelopathy); hip, knee, and shoulder replacement surgery; foot surgery; hand surgery
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rehabilitation plays a crucial role in the every field of medicine. Actual clinical needs may be faced with the huge opportunities provided by other research fields, from engineering to physiotherapy, orthopedics and so on. Personalized medicine is the new paradigm for health. Methodologies for personalized rehabilitation aim to identify the optimal management of patient care. Continuous monitoring of patients’ status during hospitalization or in the home environment, quantitative evaluation of motor abilities and physiological status allow to concretize the concepts of prevention, personalized medicine, accurate diagnosis.

This Special Issue aims to discuss the new frontiers in rehabilitation. It will focus on the novel procedures, methodologies and advances in rehabilitation.  

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
Prof. Vicenzo Denaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physiotherapy
  • Orthopedics
  • personalized medicine
  • care

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessReview
Cost-Effectiveness of Supervised versus Unsupervised Rehabilitation for Rotator-Cuff Repair: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2852; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082852 - 21 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Background: The objective of the present study was to compare the efficacy between supervised and unsupervised rehabilitation after rotator-cuff (RC) repair in terms of clinical outcomes, visual-analog-scale (VAS) score, range of motion (ROM), and risk of retear. Material: a comprehensive search of Pubmed, [...] Read more.
Background: The objective of the present study was to compare the efficacy between supervised and unsupervised rehabilitation after rotator-cuff (RC) repair in terms of clinical outcomes, visual-analog-scale (VAS) score, range of motion (ROM), and risk of retear. Material: a comprehensive search of Pubmed, CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Ovid, and Google Scholar databases through a combination of the following keywords with logical Boolean operators: “informed”, “uninformed”, “unsupervised”, “supervised”, “rehabilitation”, “physical therapy”, “physical therapies”, “postoperative period”, “physical-therapy techniques”, “physical-therapy technique”, “exercise”, “exercise therapy”, “rotator cuff”, “rotator-cuff tear”, and “rotator-cuff repair”. For each article included in the study, the following data were extracted: authors, year, study design, sample size and demographic features, RC tear characteristics, clinical outcomes, ROM, VAS score, retear rate, and time of follow-up. Meta-analysis was performed in terms of VAS score. Results: Four randomized control trials with 132 patients were included. One study demonstrated significant improvement in VAS, active ROM, and the activity of the muscle’s motor units at stop and during maximal effort in supervised patients. Another one showed lower retear rates in the supervised group. The remaining two randomized controlled trials did not reveal any significant differences between supervised and unsupervised rehabilitation in terms of clinical outcomes. Moreover, higher costs were described for supervised rehabilitation. The VAS was not significantly different in the two groups (9.9 compared with 8.25, p = 0.23). Conclusions: although several publications address the problem of RC lacerations, there is a paucity of evidence in the literature regarding the effectiveness of supervised and unsupervised rehabilitation protocols. This systematic review and meta-analysis showed no significant differences between the two types of rehabilitation in terms of VAS scores, while outlining the pros and cons of each protocol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Rehabilitation)
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Open AccessErratum
Erratum: Longo, U.G., et al. Scapular Dyskinesis: From Basic Science to Ultimate Treatment. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2974
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3810; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113810 - 27 May 2020
Abstract
The authors would like to correct the names and surnames of the following authors of their previous paper [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Rehabilitation)
Open AccessConcept Paper
Scapular Dyskinesis: From Basic Science to Ultimate Treatment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2974; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082974 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Background: This study intends to summarize the causes, clinical examination, and treatments of scapular dyskinesis (SD) and to briefly investigate whether alteration can be managed by a precision rehabilitation protocol planned on the basis of features derived from clinical tests. Methods: [...] Read more.
Background: This study intends to summarize the causes, clinical examination, and treatments of scapular dyskinesis (SD) and to briefly investigate whether alteration can be managed by a precision rehabilitation protocol planned on the basis of features derived from clinical tests. Methods: We performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, Cochrane, CINAHL and EMBASE databases using various combinations of the keywords “Rotator cuff”, “Scapula”, “Scapular Dyskinesis”, “Shoulder”, “Biomechanics” and “Arthroscopy”. Results: SD incidence is growing in patients with shoulder pathologies, even if it is not a specific injury or directly related to a particular injury. SD can be caused by multiple factors or can be the trigger of shoulder-degenerative pathologies. In both cases, SD results in a protracted scapula with the arm at rest or in motion. Conclusions: A clinical evaluation of altered shoulder kinematics is still complicated. Limitations in observing scapular motion are mainly related to the anatomical position and function of the scapula itself and the absence of a tool for quantitative SD clinical assessment. High-quality clinical trials are needed to establish whether there is a possible correlation between SD patterns and the specific findings of shoulder pathologies with altered scapular kinematics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Rehabilitation)
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