Special Issue "Injuries and Epidemiology in Professional Sports"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
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Guest Editor
Associate Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via Álvaro Del Portillo, 200, 00128 Roma
Interests: Sports traumatology of; Arthroscopic surgery of shoulder, knee and ankle; Replacement surgery of shoulder, knee and hip
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Prof. Dr. Vincenzo Denaro
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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Bio-medico University, Via Álvaro del Portillo, 200, 00128 Rome, Italy
Interests: rehabilitation in orthopaedic diseases and innovative intervention strategies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Injuries can counter the beneficial aspects related to sports activities if an athlete is unable to continue to participate because of residual effects of injury. Detailed knowledge of injury characteristics from different medical settings is essential to improve the development of injury prevention strategies in different team sports.

A better understanding of how sports injuries occur to improve their prevention is needed for medical, economic, scientific and sports success reasons. An understanding of these factors can improve their clinical management from prescribing appropriate prehabilitation to guiding postinjury rehabilitation and return to play.

This Special Issue on injuries in professional sports will focus on the epidemiology of sports-related injuries and epidemiology of trauma requiring surgery. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of sports injuries will be described, and clinical data from relevant professional competitions will be provided.

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
Prof. Vincenzo Denaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Injuries
  • Sports
  • Athlete
  • Team
  • Return to play
  • Prevention
  • Rehabilitation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Effectiveness of Warm-Up Routine on the Ankle Injuries Prevention in Young Female Basketball Players: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Medicina 2019, 55(10), 690; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55100690 - 16 Oct 2019
Abstract
Background and Objectives: Ankle joint is the most common site of injury for basketball athletes. An effective warm-up (WU) is a period of preparatory exercise to improve training performance and reduce sports injuries. Continuous examination of effective WU routines in basketball players [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Ankle joint is the most common site of injury for basketball athletes. An effective warm-up (WU) is a period of preparatory exercise to improve training performance and reduce sports injuries. Continuous examination of effective WU routines in basketball players is a necessity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of general and combined warm up on ankle injury range of motion (ROM) and balance in young female basketball players. Materials and Methods: A sample of 28 young female basketball players were randomly allocated to either global warm up control group (GWU) (n = 11) or combined warm up experimental group (CWU) (n = 17). All participants performed 7-min of run. The CWU group performed a single leg stance barefoot with eyes closed, plank forearm position and triceps sural stretching. Participants in GWU performed walking ball handling and core stability using a Swiss ball. Both WU routines were conducted 3 times per week for 10 weeks. Outcome measurements were the Stabilometric platform and dorsiflexion lunge test. Results: Twenty-eight young female basketball players completed the study. Participants in the experimental group improved significantly in the range of motion (ROM) in right and left ankle and the center of pressure displacement (CoP). The control group did not show any changes in ankle dorsiflexion and a significant reduction in all body balance parameters. Conclusions: An 8-min combined warm-up routine for 10 weeks improves the ankle dorsiflexion ROM and CoP displacement that plays a key role in ankle injuries prevention in basketball players. Further studies are strongly needed to verify our findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Injuries and Epidemiology in Professional Sports)
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Open AccessArticle
Performance Activities and Match Outcomes of Professional Soccer Teams during the 2016/2017 Serie A Season
Medicina 2019, 55(8), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55080469 - 12 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Background and Objectives: Soccer is the most popular sport in the world. To describe athletic performance, match statistics, and their relationships with the probability of achieving the first positions of the final ranking in the Italian football league “Serie A”, season 2016/2017. Materials [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Soccer is the most popular sport in the world. To describe athletic performance, match statistics, and their relationships with the probability of achieving the first positions of the final ranking in the Italian football league “Serie A”, season 2016/2017. Materials and Methods: Analyses comprised all the matches played by the 20 teams of the “Serie A” championship during the season 2016–2017. Indicators of athletic performance (total distance covered in km, jogging, running and sprint activities, and average speed) and match statistics (total shots, shots on target, goal attempts, assists, turnovers, and steals) were obtained from the Italian football league. Results: Analyses of performance activities according to the final ranking showed no significant differences for the total distance covered and speed, while a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) among teams was observed for jogging, running and sprint activities. In regard to match statistics, all the parameters investigated were significantly different among the teams. By grouping teams into four subgroups (those who qualified for the Champions League, those who qualified for the Europe League, those who ranked intermediate positions and those who relegated from the “Serie A” league), the percentage of jogging, running and sprint activities, as well as match statistics were significantly different among groups, with a downward trend for total shots, shots on target, goal attempts, assists, and turnovers. The logistic regression analysis revealed that sprint activities as well as total shots, shots on target, goal attempts, and assists higher than the 3rd tertile of their distribution were associated with a higher probability of reaching the first three positions of the final ranking. Conclusions: An increased probability to achieve the first positions of the final ranking in the Italian football league “Serie A” seemed to be mainly related to sprint activity, goal attempts, total shots, shots on target and assists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Injuries and Epidemiology in Professional Sports)
Open AccessArticle
Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injuries, Pain, and Illnesses in Elite Female Basketball Players
Medicina 2019, 55(6), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55060276 - 14 Jun 2019
Abstract
Background and Objectives: The participation of women in sports, including basketball, is becoming increasingly common, and this increased involvement raises concerns about the potential risk of sports injuries, but there is a lack of epidemiological studies about the incidence of sports injuries in [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: The participation of women in sports, including basketball, is becoming increasingly common, and this increased involvement raises concerns about the potential risk of sports injuries, but there is a lack of epidemiological studies about the incidence of sports injuries in women’s basketball, especially in Europe. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and localizations of sport related injuries and illnesses in elite female basketball players. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study. The sample consisted of 358 elite female basketball players, with a mean age of 23.4 ± 5.93 years, participated in the study. The players were interviewed using a pre-participation health questionnaire during the 2013–2016 sport seasons in the pre-season preparation phase. Results: 155 health problems were reported in 358 athletes during the screening period. The most frequently injured body parts were lower limbs: more than 60%, representing an injury rate of 0.14 per athletes and a 0.2 pain rate per athlete during the study period. Conclusions: The main findings showed the importance of monitoring lower extremity injuries and pain to pay attention to the players, which are at risk. The occurrence of injuries and pain among female basketball players was high. The lower extremities are the most frequently injured body area in the Lithuanian Women’s Basketball League. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Injuries and Epidemiology in Professional Sports)
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Open AccessCase Report
A Rare Consequence after Shoulder Dislocation in a Professional Cyclist: A Case Report
Medicina 2019, 55(9), 529; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55090529 - 25 Aug 2019
Abstract
Background: Cycling is a popular source of recreation and physical activity for children and adults. With regard to the total number of sports injuries, cycling has the highest absolute number of injuries per year in the United States population. Cycling injuries can be [...] Read more.
Background: Cycling is a popular source of recreation and physical activity for children and adults. With regard to the total number of sports injuries, cycling has the highest absolute number of injuries per year in the United States population. Cycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, or overuse injuries. Aim of this study: The aims of this case report are to report a rare clinical complication of glenohumeral joint anterior dislocation that resulted in a patient experiencing continuous GHJ dislocations secondary to involuntary violent muscular spasms and emphasize the role of the physical therapist’s differential diagnosis and clinical decision-making process in a patient following direct access referral. Case presentation: A professional 23-year-old cyclist presented to a physical therapist with spontaneous multidirectional dislocations to the right shoulder after the recurrence of trauma occurred during a recent cycling race. The dislocations do not occur at night, but occur during the day, randomly, and mostly associated with changes in the patient’s psychological conditions. Directly from the clinical history, the physical therapist identified a neuro-physiological orange flag as well as an orthopedic red flag and, therefore, decided it was appropriate to refer the patient to a neurologist. It was determined by the physical therapist to be a priority to focus on the patient’s neurologic status and then to evaluate the orthopedic problem. The neurological examination revealed a condition of spontaneous multidirectional dislocation associated with recurrent antero-posterior pain spasms of the shoulder joint. The neurologist prescribed medication. Following the second cycle of medication assumption, the patient was able to continue physiotherapy treatment and was referred to the orthopedic specialist to proceed with shoulder stabilization surgery. Discussion and conclusion: Currently, the diagnosis of this unusual clinical condition is still unclear. It is a shared opinion of the authors that the trauma during the past bicycle race awakened an underlying psychological problem of the patient that resulted in a clinical condition of weakness of all the structures of the shoulder, such that these spasms could result in multiple multidirectional dislocations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Injuries and Epidemiology in Professional Sports)
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