Feature Papers in Osteology

A special issue of Osteology (ISSN 2673-4036).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 59110

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 00128 Rome, Italy
Interests: artroscopy; shoulder; knee; ankle; joint
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

As Editor-in-Chief of Osteology, I am pleased to announce this Special Issue, entitled "Feature Papers in Osteology in 2020". Articles from Editorial Board Members and leading researchers will be collected to explore cutting-edge developments in the science of osteology. 

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following items: 

  • Bone-related diseases, including arthritis, fractures, infections, osteoporosis, tumors;
  • Molecular mechanisms research on bone and bone-related diseases;
  • Interactions of bone with other organ systems, including cartilage, muscle, and neural;
  • Biological and physiological research on bone, cartilage, joints, and spine;
  • Methodological advances in osteology;
  • Bone biomaterials. 

This Special Issue offers a timely and authoritative opportunity to present recent progress in the field of osteology. It is expected to highlight exciting challenges and future research in the field of bone science. 

Prof. Dr. Umile Giuseppe Longo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Osteology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (14 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

8 pages, 1479 KiB  
Article
The Glenoid Track Concept: On-Track and Off-Track—A Narrative Review
by Antonio Ventura, Claudia Smiraglio, Antonio Viscomi, Sergio De Salvatore and Bernardo Bertucci
Osteology 2022, 2(3), 129-136; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology2030015 - 19 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 6466
Abstract
Shoulder instability is described as a functional deficiency caused by excessive mobility of the humeral head over the glenoid. Various Glenohumeral Instability (GI) types have been described, but the traumatic anteroinferior form is the most frequent. The differences between engaging and non-engaging Hill–Sachs [...] Read more.
Shoulder instability is described as a functional deficiency caused by excessive mobility of the humeral head over the glenoid. Various Glenohumeral Instability (GI) types have been described, but the traumatic anteroinferior form is the most frequent. The differences between engaging and non-engaging Hill–Sachs lesions (HSLs) are linked to bone loss assessment. On the contrary, the novel difference between “on-track” and “off-track” lesions is strictly related to surgical techniques. The specific involvement of glenoid and humerus bone defects in recurrent GI was poorly assessed in the literature before the glenoid-track concept (GT). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Arthro-MRI have been widely used to identify and characterize lesions to the ligamentous structures. However, only new technologies (3 Tesla MRI) accurately detect HSLs. On the contrary, Computed Tomography (CT) has been adopted to quantify glenoid bone deficit. The GT concept is a valuable tool for evaluating anterior shoulder instability in patients. Shoulders out of alignment may require more than just an arthroscopic Bankart, and a remplissage or bone transfer may be necessary. Specifically, isolated Bankart repair should be considered in patients with recurrent instability and an on-track lesion with less than 25% glenoid bone loss. In off-track lesions and less than 25% glenoid bone loss, remplissage should be used. Bone transplant surgery is required for patients with a glenoid bone defect of more than 25%. This narrative review aims to report the most updated findings on “on-track” and “off-track” lesions in GI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

8 pages, 1059 KiB  
Article
Multi-Level Fibrotomy for Pediatric Patients with Cerebral Palsy: A Cohort Study
by Pier Francesco Costici, Sergio De Salvatore, Rosa Russo, Leonardo Oggiano, Aaron Burrofato, Fabrizio Donati and Laura Ruzzini
Osteology 2021, 1(3), 141-148; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology1030015 - 16 Aug 2021
Viewed by 3832
Abstract
Muscle retraction in Cerebral Palsy (CP) often requires surgical treatment. Multilevel procedures (using open or percutaneous techniques) are commonly performed in the ambulant patient with CP. The necessity to find new surgical techniques, reduce postoperative discomfort, and accelerate the healing process and rehabilitation [...] Read more.
Muscle retraction in Cerebral Palsy (CP) often requires surgical treatment. Multilevel procedures (using open or percutaneous techniques) are commonly performed in the ambulant patient with CP. The necessity to find new surgical techniques, reduce postoperative discomfort, and accelerate the healing process and rehabilitation is mandatory for these patients. A retrospective cohort study with 189 pediatric patients with CP was performed. The multilevel gradual fibrotomy of Ulzibat was modified using an ophthalmic knife. No significant complications were reported using our technique. Opioid drugs were not necessary, and casting time was reduced at the first 24 h. A significant Range of Motion recovery was assessed post-operatory and maintained at the last follow-up. Mean days of hospitalization were 2.2. The mean follow-up was 39 months (6–64 months). The modified multilevel fibrotomy reduces postoperative pain with easier patient management, resulting in a faster discharge from the hospital. However, the retrospective nature and the lack of a control group of the present study did not allow the authors to report significant results. Further studies with longer follow-up are in progress to obtain more certain data that confirm our preliminary results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1507 KiB  
Article
Comparative Evaluation of Primary Stability between Different Diameters Multi-Scale Roughness Dental Implant by Solid Rigid Polyurethane Simulation
by Margherita Tumedei, Morena Petrini, Alessandro Cipollina, Mariastella Di Carmine, Adriano Piattelli, Antonio Cucurullo and Giovanna Iezzi
Osteology 2021, 1(1), 62-72; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology1010006 - 12 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3436
Abstract
Background: Implant primary stability is determined by screw characteristics and surgical procedure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, on a polyurethane model, the insertion torque (IT), removal torque (RT), and resonance frequency analysis (RFA) of multi-scale roughness dental implants of [...] Read more.
Background: Implant primary stability is determined by screw characteristics and surgical procedure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, on a polyurethane model, the insertion torque (IT), removal torque (RT), and resonance frequency analysis (RFA) of multi-scale roughness dental implants of different diameters. Methods: Two implant sizes were tested on two polyurethane blocks (20 pounds per cubic foot (PCF) and 30 PCF): 3.0 diameter and 13 mm length and 5.0 diameter and 13 mm length. The IT, RT, and RFA were assessed. Results: A significant difference of IT and RT was present in favor of wider implants at both polyurethane densities. No statistical difference was present between the 5.0 diameter and 3.0 diameter implants at both polyurethane densities. A statistically increased RFA was reported for 5.0 implant 30 PCF polyurethane blocks. Conclusions: Multi-scale roughness dental implants of both diameters showed high insertion torque and primary stability on polyurethane blocks, which is valuable for implant loading protocols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 284 KiB  
Article
Delayed Rehabilitation Protocol after Rotator Cuff Repair
by Alessandra Berton, Sergio De Salvatore, Vincenzo Candela, Gabriele Cortina, Daniela Lo Presti, Carlo Massaroni, Stefano Petrillo and Vincenzo Denaro
Osteology 2021, 1(1), 29-38; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology1010003 - 26 Dec 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 5590
Abstract
Rotator cuff tears are a frequent cause of shoulder pain that often require arthroscopic repair. After surgery an intense and well-studied rehabilitation protocol is needed to obtain the complete recovery of shoulder function. Fifty patients, who sustained arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for symptomatic, [...] Read more.
Rotator cuff tears are a frequent cause of shoulder pain that often require arthroscopic repair. After surgery an intense and well-studied rehabilitation protocol is needed to obtain the complete recovery of shoulder function. Fifty patients, who sustained arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for symptomatic, atraumatic and full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear, were involved. According to our rehabilitation protocol, during the first four postoperative weeks, the arm was supported with an abduction sling pillow, and pendulum exercises, table slide and active elbow extension and flexion were conceded. Outcome measures (Oxford shoulder score (OSS), simple shoulder test (SST), patient-reported satisfaction), shoulder function (range of motion (ROM) and muscle strength), and MRI examination were evaluated. The mean OSS score and SST score increased from 16 to 30.2 and from 5.3 to 11.4, respectively. Patient-reported satisfaction was 96%. At 12 months, patients improved ROM and muscle strength. Postoperative passive anterior elevation was 176; external rotation averaged 47; internal rotation was 90. Postoperative muscle strength during anterior elevation was 8.3 ± 2.2 kg, internal rotation 6.8 ± 3 kg, external rotation 5.5 ± 2.3 kg. Five out of seven patients with recurrent tears evaluated their results as satisfactory. They reported improvements in terms of OSS and SST mean scores despite recurrent tears; therefore, they did not undergo revision surgery. The delayed postoperative physical therapy protocol was associated with improvements in the outcome measures and shoulder function compared to the preoperatory state and rotator cuff healing demonstrated by MRI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

9 pages, 3039 KiB  
Review
The Remplissage Technique for Hill–Sachs Lesions in Competitive Athletes: A Narrative Review
by Michele Novi and Simone Nicoletti
Osteology 2022, 2(4), 152-160; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology2040018 - 17 Nov 2022
Viewed by 3834
Abstract
Anterior shoulder instability with Bankart lesion and associated posterior humeral head injury (Hill–Sachs) is common in athletes. Several treatments have been proposed for the management of the Hill–Sachs lesion, from bone grafts or rotation osteotomies to capsulotendinous interposition, such as remplissage. This procedure [...] Read more.
Anterior shoulder instability with Bankart lesion and associated posterior humeral head injury (Hill–Sachs) is common in athletes. Several treatments have been proposed for the management of the Hill–Sachs lesion, from bone grafts or rotation osteotomies to capsulotendinous interposition, such as remplissage. This procedure has been shown to be safe and effective in increasing glenohumeral stability. However, the correct indication concerning the bone defect and its effects in terms of range of motion and function, especially in highly demanding patients, is still debated. This narrative review aims to present the current state-of-the-art of the posterior capsulotenodesis in association with Bankart repair, for treating anterior shoulder instability in competitive athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2983 KiB  
Review
Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: A Minimally Invasive Procedure for the Management of Vertebral Compression Fractures
by Eliodoro Faiella, Giuseppina Pacella, Carlo Altomare, Caterina Bernetti, Marina Sarli, Laura Cea, Fabrizio Russo, Gianluca Vadalà, Bruno Beomonte Zobel and Rosario Francesco Grasso
Osteology 2022, 2(4), 139-151; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology2040017 - 10 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3949
Abstract
A vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is a pathological condition, which can be caused by osteoporotic degeneration or metastatic disease. It represents a socioeconomic burden on healthcare systems, due to increased pain, long-term morbidity, and disability. Vertebroplasty (VP) is an image-guided, minimally invasive, interventional [...] Read more.
A vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is a pathological condition, which can be caused by osteoporotic degeneration or metastatic disease. It represents a socioeconomic burden on healthcare systems, due to increased pain, long-term morbidity, and disability. Vertebroplasty (VP) is an image-guided, minimally invasive, interventional procedure, in which bone cement is injected via a percutaneous approach into the vertebral soma, to provide structural support and to stabilize the weakened structure. The aim of this narrative review is to describe vertebral column biomechanics, as well as indications, contraindications, and techniques to successfully perform VP for the treatment of VCFs. Methods: We performed a narrative literature review on the main online databases regarding VP, and mainly focused on patient selection, preoperative imaging, procedural steps, complications, and outcomes. Results: The most recent evidence in the literature has shown that VP provides significant and sustained clinical benefits for patients with a VCF, and it is indicated in patients with comorbidities that make prolonged bed rest dangerous, patients with fractures that fail to heal, and as palliation in patients with a painful VCF due to metastatic disease. Conclusions: VP is considered to be a safe and effective treatment option for the treatment of osteoporotic and malignant VCFs that are resistant to adequate medical therapy. Patient selection, preprocedural evaluation, and proper technique execution are the key points to obtain the best outcomes and to minimize complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

8 pages, 261 KiB  
Review
Current Perspectives on Rotator Cuff Disease
by Barbara Juliette Mera
Osteology 2022, 2(2), 62-69; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology2020007 - 29 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2171
Abstract
Rotator cuff (RC) disease, defined as any pathological state of the rotator cuff, is one of the most common shoulder conditions worldwide. It accounts for 70% of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults and is the third most prevalent musculoskeletal disorder. Currently, the [...] Read more.
Rotator cuff (RC) disease, defined as any pathological state of the rotator cuff, is one of the most common shoulder conditions worldwide. It accounts for 70% of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults and is the third most prevalent musculoskeletal disorder. Currently, the main issue with rotator cuff disease is that surgery represents the most common treatment performed. However, rotator cuff surgeries have a high failure rate positively correlated with the severity of the tear, and a high re-tear rate. This review will focus on the current research perspectives of rotator cuff repairs as well as new advances in the field. Current research is shifting its focus to target the healing and tendon repair process in an aim to decrease the failure rates. The bulk of research right now is within biologic methods based on growth factors, repair scaffolds, and stem cells that promote healing. Among this, researchers are continuously trying to improve surgical techniques. The complement of both methods should pave the way for much more effective, longer-lasting rotator cuff repairs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
10 pages, 306 KiB  
Review
Evolution of Anesthetic Techniques for Shoulder Surgery: A Narrative Review
by Francesca Gargano, Sabrina Migliorelli, Alessandro Strumia, Massimiliano Carassiti and Felice Eugenio Agrò
Osteology 2022, 2(1), 52-61; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology2010006 - 6 Mar 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4315
Abstract
Shoulder surgery has radically evolved within the last 70 years, from a marginal orthopedic sub-specialty to an area of great research and advancement; consequently, anesthetic techniques have undergone important development. In fact, a wide variety of anesthetic strategies have emerged, to provide anesthesia [...] Read more.
Shoulder surgery has radically evolved within the last 70 years, from a marginal orthopedic sub-specialty to an area of great research and advancement; consequently, anesthetic techniques have undergone important development. In fact, a wide variety of anesthetic strategies have emerged, to provide anesthesia and post-operative analgesia: general anesthesia (GA), regional anesthesia (RA), or combined GA and RA. A literature review on online databases was carried out about the different anesthetic approaches for shoulder surgery and their evolution through the years, taking in consideration papers from 1929 to 2021. A comprehensive preoperative assessment of patients undergoing shoulder surgery allows to identify and modify potential risk factors and complications of general anesthesia. Moreover, the use of ultrasound-guided regional blocks could improve the effectiveness of these techniques and bring better postoperative outcomes. Anesthetic management for shoulder surgery has progressed drastically during the last century. More studies are needed to finally standardize anesthetic techniques for specific procedure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
12 pages, 541 KiB  
Review
Patellar Instability in Pediatric Patients: Review of the Literature
by Filippo Familiari, Riza Mert Cetik and Gazi Huri
Osteology 2021, 1(4), 197-208; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology1040019 - 24 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3792
Abstract
Patellar instability is a common pathology of the knee in pediatric patients. The management of this condition can be a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon, and a comprehensive understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the structures around the knee is of utmost [...] Read more.
Patellar instability is a common pathology of the knee in pediatric patients. The management of this condition can be a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon, and a comprehensive understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the structures around the knee is of utmost importance in formulating a treatment plan. Predisposing factors can be related to: trochlear and patellar morphological abnormalities, ligamentous stabilizers, limb geometries in the axial plane, and patellar height abnormalities. Traditionally, first-time dislocators have been treated non-operatively; however, recent evidence suggests that certain factors are related to recurrent instability, and surgical treatment may be considered even after the first dislocation. It is important to keep in mind that younger children with open physes are not suitable candidates for certain surgical techniques. In this comprehensive review, we aimed to focus on the most up-to-date information on this topic and emphasize the importance of individualizing the treatment of pediatric patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2406 KiB  
Review
An Overview of Achilles Tendinopathy Management
by Fabio Santacaterina, Sandra Miccinilli, Federica Bressi, Silvia Sterzi and Marco Bravi
Osteology 2021, 1(4), 175-186; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology1040017 - 29 Sep 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 8014
Abstract
Background: Persistent tendon pain and swelling related to mechanical loading are the main signs of Achilles tendinopathy (AT). This condition is one of the most common tendinopathies of the lower limb affecting mainly athletes involved in running and jumping sports. Methods: we included [...] Read more.
Background: Persistent tendon pain and swelling related to mechanical loading are the main signs of Achilles tendinopathy (AT). This condition is one of the most common tendinopathies of the lower limb affecting mainly athletes involved in running and jumping sports. Methods: we included pivotal papers retrieved from the literature (Pubmed, Google Scholar, PEDro, and Scopus) to present an overview of the management of AT, with a specific focus on conservative management. Results: An accurate and timely diagnosis of AT is necessary to set up early treatments and to manage the problem conservatively. Diagnosis is primarily based on clinical assessment; instrumental imaging may be helpful in confirming the clinical diagnosis. Conservative treatment is effective in most cases, mainly using physical exercise based on eccentric training. Other non-surgical treatments such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy, thermotherapies, and injections can be added to exercise. Surgical treatment is indicated for patients where the conservative treatments of at least six months fails. Conclusions: Conflicting results from numerous studies hamper to identify gold standard treatments asking for further well-conducted level I and II research about the management of AT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

9 pages, 4146 KiB  
Opinion
Calcific Shoulder Tendinopathy (CT): Influence of the Biochemical Process of Hydrolysis of HA (Hydroxyapatite) on the Choice of Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Treatment (with the Three-Needle Technique)
by Stefano Galletti, Marco Miceli, Salvatore Massimo Stella, Fabio Vita, Davide Bigliardi, Danilo Donati, Domenico Creta and Antonio Frizziero
Osteology 2022, 2(3), 112-120; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology2030013 - 27 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2156
Abstract
Calcific shoulder tendinopathy (CT) is a common condition involving the central part or insertion of the rotator cuff tendons (RC) or the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa (SASD). The calcific deposits consist of poorly crystallized calcium hydroxyapatite but the mechanism of their formation still remains unclear. [...] Read more.
Calcific shoulder tendinopathy (CT) is a common condition involving the central part or insertion of the rotator cuff tendons (RC) or the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa (SASD). The calcific deposits consist of poorly crystallized calcium hydroxyapatite but the mechanism of their formation still remains unclear. CT can be divided into three distinct stages, as reported by Uthhoff et al. Clinically, this condition varies with the extent of the calcification and the phase of the condition. In particular, the disorder is asymptomatic or may cause mild discomfort during the deposition of calcium, while it becomes acutely painful during the resorptive phase. US-PICT (ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy) is indicated in the acute phase (resorptive phase) of CT with significant pain relief and a very low rate of minor complications. The aim of this manuscript is to define the rationale of the ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy, correlating it with the sequence of biochemical processes that lead to the hydrolysis of hydroxyapatite. Furthermore, we will explain the reasons why we prefer using the three-needle technique for the dissolution of calcifications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

6 pages, 2451 KiB  
Case Report
Angiomatoid Fibrous Histiocytoma: Case Presentation with Review of Literature
by Gerardo Cazzato, Anna Colagrande, Antonietta Cimmino, Mariella Silecchia, Teresa Lettini, Leonardo Resta and Giuseppe Ingravallo
Osteology 2021, 1(3), 112-117; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology1030012 - 30 Jun 2021
Viewed by 2689
Abstract
Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma is a rare neoplasm with an intermediate malignant potential, that mostly occurs in the subcutis and features varying proportions of epithelioid, ovoid and spindle cells in a nodular and syncytial growth pattern, with hemorrhagic pseudovascular spaces. Here, we report the [...] Read more.
Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma is a rare neoplasm with an intermediate malignant potential, that mostly occurs in the subcutis and features varying proportions of epithelioid, ovoid and spindle cells in a nodular and syncytial growth pattern, with hemorrhagic pseudovascular spaces. Here, we report the clinical case of a 68-year-old man who presented with AFH on the right arm; the disease relapsed a few years after surgical excision. We also conduct a brief review of the literature, focusing on the biological and genetic characteristics and the differential diagnosis from other more or less similar entities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

7 pages, 242 KiB  
Concept Paper
The Products of Bone Resorption and Their Roles in Metabolism: Lessons from the Study of Burns
by Gordon L. Klein
Osteology 2021, 1(2), 73-79; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology1020007 - 1 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2827
Abstract
Surprisingly little is known about the factors released from bone during resorption and the metabolic roles they play. This paper describes what we have learned about factors released from bone, mainly through the study of burn injuries, and what roles they play in [...] Read more.
Surprisingly little is known about the factors released from bone during resorption and the metabolic roles they play. This paper describes what we have learned about factors released from bone, mainly through the study of burn injuries, and what roles they play in post-burn metabolism. From these studies, we know that calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium, along with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, are released from bone following resorption. Additionally, studies in mice from Karsenty’s laboratory have indicated that undercarboxylated osteocalcin is also released from bone during resorption. Questions arising from these observations are discussed as well as a variety of potential conditions in which release of these factors could play a significant role in the pathophysiology of the conditions. Therapeutic implications of understanding the metabolic roles of these and as yet other unidentified factors are also raised. While much remains unknown, that which has been observed provides a glimpse of the potential importance of this area of study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
14 pages, 15149 KiB  
Systematic Review
Isolated Medial Subtalar Joint Dislocation during Sports Activities: A Systematic Review of the Literature with Individual Participant Data Analysis
by Carlo Biz, Giovanni Baldin, Claudia Cappelletto, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi, Pietro Nicoletti, Alberto Crimì and Pietro Ruggieri
Osteology 2021, 1(1), 48-61; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology1010005 - 5 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4261
Abstract
In athletes, one of the most common injuries is a sprained ankle. If the energy of the trauma is particularly high, this type of injury can lead to an isolated medial dislocation of the subtalar joint (STJ), a rare condition poorly described in [...] Read more.
In athletes, one of the most common injuries is a sprained ankle. If the energy of the trauma is particularly high, this type of injury can lead to an isolated medial dislocation of the subtalar joint (STJ), a rare condition poorly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to verify if a reliable conservative treatment and a specific physiotherapy rehabilitation protocol in isolated medial dislocation of the STJ in athletes is described in the literature. A systematic review of the published literature of the last 11 years was performed by applying the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines using three databases: Pubmed, Scopus, and Web of Science. The keywords used were “(subtalar OR talocalcaneal) AND dislocation”. We considered only studies that included professional or amateur athletes (athletic patients). We used the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale, range of motion (ROM) of the subtalar and ankle joint, subtalar and talonavicular joint osteoarthritis, and patient feedback to evaluate their outcomes. A total of 12 studies were included in our review, with a total of 26 athletic patients. Sixteen of them had good results with the correlation between the duration of immobilisation and the outcomes. Nevertheless, due to the small number of patients included in the analysed studies on this subject in the literature, there is not yet a univocal clinical protocol to treat the isolated medial subtalar joint dislocation (STJD) warranting further research in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Osteology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop