Special Issue "The Burden of Orthopedic Surgery"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
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Guest Editor
Associate Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via Álvaro Del Portillo, 200, 00128 Roma
Interests: Sports traumatology of; Arthroscopic surgery of shoulder, knee and ankle; Replacement surgery of shoulder, knee and hip
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Prof. Vicenzo Denaro
Website
Guest Editor
Full Professor and Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Via Álvaro Del Portillo, 200, 00128 Roma, Italy
Interests: spine surgery (scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, spinal disc herniation, myelopathy); hip, knee, and shoulder replacement surgery; foot surgery; hand surgery
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of IJERPH, we are organising a Special Issue about the burden of orthopaedic surgery. IJERPH is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes manuscripts in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health.

Due to the impact in terms of morbidity, long-term disability and health-related quality of life, musculoskeletal disorders are one of the most common reasons for medical examination. Orthopaedic surgery is often the optimal treatment for a broad range of different diseases. With increasing age and population, the number of surgical procedures, payment for medical care and direct and indirect costs go beyond the clinical practice leading to a significant socioeconomic burden. The current literature highlights the need for studies addressing the potential associations between effective health care and management strategies with the aim to improve the standard of care and reduce associated costs.

Therefore, the purpose of this Special Issue is to gather researches that highlight the burden of orthopaedic surgery in terms of the epidemiological impact of specific musculoskeletal diseases, quality of life reduction, and the cost-effectiveness of surgical strategies. We welcome preliminary studies, original research papers, and systematic reviews, as well as meta-analyses.

Prof. Umile Giuseppe Longo
Prof. Vicenzo Denaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Musculoskeletal disorders
  • Surgical procedure
  • Orthopaedic surgery
  • Health care systems
  • Quality of life
  • Epidemiology
  • Interdisciplinary medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Synthetic Bone Grafting in Aseptic Loosening of Acetabular Cup: Good Clinical and Radiological Outcomes in Contained Bone Defects at Medium-Term Follow Up
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5624; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155624 - 04 Aug 2020
Abstract
Restoring bone loss is one of the major challenges when facing hip revision surgery. To eliminate the risk of disease transmission and antigenicity of allografts and donor-morbidity of autografts, the use of synthetic bioceramics has become popular in the last decade. Our study [...] Read more.
Restoring bone loss is one of the major challenges when facing hip revision surgery. To eliminate the risk of disease transmission and antigenicity of allografts and donor-morbidity of autografts, the use of synthetic bioceramics has become popular in the last decade. Our study investigated the effectiveness of impaction bone grafting (IBG) of contained acetabular defects (Paprosky 2 and 3a) using a porous ceramic-based hydroxyapatite bone substitute (Engipore, provided by Finceramica Faenza S.p.A., Faenza, Italy) mixed with a low percentage of autologous bone (obtained from reaming when available). We retrospectively assessed 36 patients who underwent acetabular revision using IBG using a porous ceramic-based hydroxyapatite bone substitute with cementless implants with a mean follow-up of 4.4 years. We evaluated, at regular intervals, patients clinically (using the Hip Harris Score and Oxford Score) and radiologically to evaluate the rate of incorporation of the graft, the presence of radiolucent lines or migrations of the cup. Clinical scores significantly improved (WOMAC improved from 49.7–67.30, and the HSS from 56–89). The rate of implants’ survival was 100% at our medium follow-up (4.4 years). We reported five cases of minor migration of the cup, and radiolucent lines were visible in seven patients at the last-follow up. The graft was well-incorporated in all patients. The results presented in this study suggest the HA bone substitute is an effective and safe bone graft when facing hip revision surgery; thus, longer follow-up studies are required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Burden of Orthopedic Surgery)
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Open AccessArticle
Epidemiology of Paediatric Shoulder Dislocation: A Nationwide Study in Italy from 2001 to 2014
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2834; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082834 - 20 Apr 2020
Abstract
Limited knowledge is accessible concerning the tendencies of hospitalization for skeletally immature patients with episodes of shoulder dislocation. Our research aim was to evaluate annual hospitalizations for shoulder dislocation in paediatric patients in Italy from 2001 to 2014, on the basis of the [...] Read more.
Limited knowledge is accessible concerning the tendencies of hospitalization for skeletally immature patients with episodes of shoulder dislocation. Our research aim was to evaluate annual hospitalizations for shoulder dislocation in paediatric patients in Italy from 2001 to 2014, on the basis of the official data source as hospitalization reports. The second purpose was to investigate geographical diversification in hospitalization for shoulder dislocation in regions of Italy. The last aim was to make statistical predictions of the number of shoulder dislocation hospitalization volumes and rates in skeletally immature patients based on data from 2001 to 2014. An examination of the National Hospital Discharge records (SDO) kept at the Italian Ministry of Health regarding the 14 years of our study (2001 through 2014) was conducted. These data are anonymous and include patient’s age, gender, domicile, region and time of hospitalization, and the kind of reimbursement (public or private). In the 14-year study time, 344 hospitalizations for shoulder dislocation of patients aged 0–14 years took place in Italy. The male/female hospitalization ratio varied from a maximum of 3.0 (2001) to a minimum of 1.1 (2013), with a mean average ratio in the 2001–2014 timespan of 2.0. Almost half of the hospitalizations (49.1%) were performed in the South. The mean incidence of hospitalizations in Italy for shoulder dislocation in patients with less than 14 years was 0.3 for every 100,000 inhabitants in the same class of age. The most common treatment was a closed reduction (60.8%), followed by open stabilization (16.6%) and arthroscopic procedures (13.7%). The present registry study shows a low incidence of hospitalization for shoulder dislocation in young patients. The most common treatment for a shoulder dislocation in paediatric patients is a closed shoulder reduction. Regions from the south and the centre of Italy are marked by an inferior number of operations and a higher number of hospitalization for closed shoulder reduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Burden of Orthopedic Surgery)
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