Special Issue "Polymer Composites: Development and Functionality"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Composites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Juan Pedro Fernández
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IMDEA Materials Institute, C/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid, Spain
Interests: polymer composites; nanocomposites; thermomechanical properties; crystallization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Though the history of polymer composites is relatively short, their development has been continuous since the moment bakelite, i.e., asbestos mixed with phenol and formaldehide and hardened by controlled pressure and temperature, considered as the first polymer composite, was patented by Baekeland in 1909. A key of polymer composites’ success is rooted in their versatility, as polymers can be combined as matrices, with hundreds of different options, and other compounds from nanoscale (carbon nanotube, graphene or metal nanowires, etc.) to macro scale (silica, talk, carbon, glass fibers, etc.) give infinitive solutions to create new materials. Likewise, polymer composites’ applications have grown extensively from mainly structural to many different fields, such as biomedical, energy storage, transportation, robotic, defense systems, and information technology, among others, thanks mainly to the multifunctionality that polymer composites may have, depending on the polymer matrix and the specific additives and reinforcements used.

We are presently living a new industrial revolution based on the changes we have experiences in our lifestyles in recent years, increasingly more based on the use of technology devices which require new materials and more energy, causing an intensive natural resource consumption. This process has led to one of the top problems of our generation, environmental protection. Therefore, multifunctional polymer composites must play an important role in the future due to their versatility, such as in the use of new resins and reinforcements, as well as in new processing methods, such as additive manufacturing.

Thus, the topic of this Special Issue is really broad, from the use of new resins such as bio, recyclable, or healable resin, among others, to all kind of additives or reinforcements which provide different multifunctionality to composites. Manufacturing processes are also of interest in this Special Issue, as new or improved technologies are essential in the development and implementation of polymer composites in our evolving style of life.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Juan Pedro Fernández
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • multifunctional
  • polymer–matrix composite
  • biopolymer
  • nanocomposite
  • mechanical properties
  • electrical properties
  • thermal properties
  • fiber
  • natural fiber
  • structural composite
  • sensing
  • shielding
  • energy storage
  • actuation
  • smart material
  • porous material
  • conductivity
  • self-healing
  • additive manufacturing
  • 3D printing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mechanical, Thermal and Rheological Properties of Polyethylene-Based Composites Filled with Micrometric Aluminum Powder
Materials 2020, 13(5), 1242; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13051242 - 09 Mar 2020
Abstract
Investigations related to polymer/metal composites are often limited to the analysis of the electrical and thermal conductivity of the materials. The presented study aims to analyze the impact of aluminum (Al) filler content (from 1 to 20 wt%) on the rarely investigated properties [...] Read more.
Investigations related to polymer/metal composites are often limited to the analysis of the electrical and thermal conductivity of the materials. The presented study aims to analyze the impact of aluminum (Al) filler content (from 1 to 20 wt%) on the rarely investigated properties of composites based on the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix. The crystalline structure, rheological (melt flow index and oscillatory rheometry), thermal (differential scanning calorimetry), as well as static (tensile tests, hardness, rebound resilience) and dynamic (dynamical mechanical analysis) mechanical properties of composites were investigated. The incorporation of 1 and 2 wt% of aluminum filler resulted in small enhancements of mechanical properties, while loadings of 5 and 10 wt% provided materials with a similar performance to neat HDPE. Such results were supported by the lack of disturbances in the rheological behavior of composites. The presented results indicate that a significant content of aluminum filler may be introduced into the HDPE matrix without additional pre-treatment and does not cause the deterioration of composites’ performance, which should be considered beneficial when engineering PE/metal composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Composites: Development and Functionality)
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Open AccessArticle
Printed PEDOT:PSS Trilayer: Mechanism Evaluation and Application in Energy Storage
Materials 2020, 13(2), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020491 - 20 Jan 2020
Abstract
Combining ink-jet printing and one of the most stable electroactive materials, PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate)), is envisaged to pave the way for the mass production of soft electroactive materials. Despite its being a well-known electroactive material, widespread application of PEDOT:PSS also requires good understanding [...] Read more.
Combining ink-jet printing and one of the most stable electroactive materials, PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate)), is envisaged to pave the way for the mass production of soft electroactive materials. Despite its being a well-known electroactive material, widespread application of PEDOT:PSS also requires good understanding of its response. However, agreement on the interpretation of the material’s activities, notably regarding actuation, is not unanimous. Our goal in this work is to study the behavior of trilayers with PEDOT:PSS electrodes printed on either side of a semi-interpenetrated polymer network membrane in propylene carbonate solutions of three different electrolytes, and to compare their electroactive, actuation, and energy storage behavior. The balance of apparent faradaic and non-faradaic processes in each case is discussed. The results show that the primarily cation-dominated response of the trilayers in the three electrolytes is actually remarkably different, with some rather uncommon outcomes. The different balance of the apparent charging mechanisms makes it possible to clearly select one electrolyte for potential actuation and another for energy storage application scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Composites: Development and Functionality)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Characterization of Ethylenediamine-Polyurea Microcapsule Epoxy Self-Healing Coating
Materials 2020, 13(2), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020326 - 10 Jan 2020
Abstract
Polyurea microcapsules with Ethylenediamine (EDA) as the core material were synthesized. A set of characterization methods, including optical and scanning electron microscopy (OM and SEM), the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to confirm the microcapsule morphology and [...] Read more.
Polyurea microcapsules with Ethylenediamine (EDA) as the core material were synthesized. A set of characterization methods, including optical and scanning electron microscopy (OM and SEM), the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to confirm the microcapsule morphology and chemical structures. The influence of emulsifier content and stirring rate on size and morphology of the microcapsules was investigated, and the self-healing performance of EDA-Polyurea microcapsule/epoxy coatings was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The results showed that the microcapsules obtained had good spherical shape with a mean diameter of 0.54–0.70 μm. Compared with pure core material, the microcapsule showed excellent thermostability, and the content of core materials was up to 56.00 wt%. The epoxy coating with 5.0 wt% EDA-Polyurea microcapsules achieved average corrosion resistance efficiencies of 90.00%, significantly enhancing the capability of the scratched coating to resist external corrosion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Composites: Development and Functionality)
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