Special Issue "Advances in Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Iza K. Radecka
Website
Guest Editor
University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, United Kingdom
Interests: biocompatible and biodegradable polymers; antimicrobials; drug delivery systems; wound dressings; probiotics; bioremediation
Prof. Dr. Marek M. Kowalczuk
Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, Zabrze, Poland
2. School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK
Interests: biocompatible and biodegradable polymer systems; polymer mass spectrometry; bioactive oligomers; controlled drug delivery systems; ring-opening polymerization; forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Both natural and synthetic polymers represent the largest and the most versatile class of materials. In recent years, polymeric materials have constituted an important class of biomedical materials and are used in a variety of biomedical applications including drug delivery systems, wound healing, polymers with antibacterial properties, and tissue engineering. Polymeric materials can be designed to act as substitutes for the structure and function of body components. This adaptability to deliver a lardge range of effective therapies is mainly attributed to the fact that polymers can be designed with a wide variety of structures and appropriate physical, chemical and surface properties.

This Special Issue is dedicated to recent advances in natural and synthetic polymeric materials with desired physical, chemical, biological, biomechanical and degradation properties to match the various requirements of specific biomedical applications. Discussion of the manufacturing of the advanced polymeric materials and their application in the biomedical field is also welcome.

It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute a manuscript to this Special Issue. Full research papers, short communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Iza K. Radecka
Prof. Dr. Marek M. Kowalczuk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biocompatible and biodegradable polymers
  • drug delivery systems
  • antimicrobials
  • wound healing

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Bioactive (Co)oligoesters as Potential Delivery Systems of p-Anisic Acid for Cosmetic Purposes
Materials 2020, 13(18), 4153; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184153 - 18 Sep 2020
Abstract
This article reports the studies on bioactive (co)oligoesters towards their use as controlled delivery systems of p-anisic acid. The objects of the study were oligo[3-hydroxy-3-(4-methoxybenzoyloxymethyl)propionate], (p-AA-CH2-HP)n oligoester, and oligo[(3-hydroxy-3-(4-methoxybenzoyloxymethyl)propionate)-co-(3-hydroxybutyrate)] [(p-AA-CH2-HP)x-co-(HB)y (co)oligoesters containing p-anisic acid moiety [...] Read more.
This article reports the studies on bioactive (co)oligoesters towards their use as controlled delivery systems of p-anisic acid. The objects of the study were oligo[3-hydroxy-3-(4-methoxybenzoyloxymethyl)propionate], (p-AA-CH2-HP)n oligoester, and oligo[(3-hydroxy-3-(4-methoxybenzoyloxymethyl)propionate)-co-(3-hydroxybutyrate)] [(p-AA-CH2-HP)x-co-(HB)y (co)oligoesters containing p-anisic acid moiety (p-AA, as the bioactive end and side groups) connected to the polymer backbone through the susceptible to hydrolysis ester bonds. A thorough insight into the hydrolysis process of the bioactive (co)oligoesters studied has allowed us to determine the release profile of p-AA as well as to identify polymer carrier degradation products. The p-AA release profiles determined on the basis of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements showed that the release of the bioactive compound from the developed (co)oligoester systems was regular and no burst effect occurred. Biological studies demonstrated that studied (homo)- and (co)oligoesters were well tolerated by HaCaT cells because none of them showed notable cytotoxicity. They promoted keratinocyte growth at moderate concentrations. Bioactive (co)oligoesters containing p-anisic acid moiety had somewhat decreased cell proliferation at the highest concentration (100 µg/mL). The important practical inference of the current study is that the (co)oligoesters developed have a relatively large load of the biologically active substance (p-AA) per polymer macromolecule, which unlocks their potential application in the cosmetic industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Polydopamine Linking Substrate for AMPs: Characterisation and Stability on Ti6Al4V
Materials 2020, 13(17), 3714; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13173714 - 22 Aug 2020
Abstract
Infections are common complications in joint replacement surgeries. Eradicated infections can lead to implant failure. In this paper, analogues of the peptide KR-12 derived from the human cathelicidin LL-37 were designed, synthesised, and characterised. The designed antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were attached to the [...] Read more.
Infections are common complications in joint replacement surgeries. Eradicated infections can lead to implant failure. In this paper, analogues of the peptide KR-12 derived from the human cathelicidin LL-37 were designed, synthesised, and characterised. The designed antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were attached to the surface of a titanium alloy, Ti6Al4V, by conjugation to a polydopamine linking substrate. The topography of the polydopamine coating was evaluated by electron microscopy and coating thickness measurements were performed with ellipsometry and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The subsequently attached peptide stability was investigated with release profile studies in simulated body fluid, using both fluorescence imaging and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Finally, the hydrophobicity of the coating was characterised by water contact angle measurements. The designed AMPs were shown to provide long-term bonding to the polydopamine-coated Ti6Al4V surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessCommunication
Hierarchical Composite Meshes of Electrospun PS Microfibers with PA6 Nanofibers for Regenerative Medicine
Materials 2020, 13(8), 1974; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13081974 - 23 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
One of the most frequently applied polymers in regenerative medicine is polystyrene (PS), which is commonly used as a flat surface and requires surface modifications for cell culture study. Here, hierarchical composite meshes were fabricated via electrospinning PS with nylon 6 (PA6) to [...] Read more.
One of the most frequently applied polymers in regenerative medicine is polystyrene (PS), which is commonly used as a flat surface and requires surface modifications for cell culture study. Here, hierarchical composite meshes were fabricated via electrospinning PS with nylon 6 (PA6) to obtain enhanced cell proliferation, development, and integration with nondegradable polymer fibers. The biomimetic approach of designed meshes was verified with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and MTS assay up to 7 days of cell culture. In particular, adding PA6 nanofibers changes the fibroblast attachment to meshes and their development, which can be observed by cell flattening, filopodia formation, and spreading. The proposed single-step manufacturing of meshes controlled the surface properties and roughness of produced composites, allowing governing cell behavior. Within this study, we show the alternative engineering of nondegradable meshes without post-treatment steps, which can be used in various applications in regenerative medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
New Poly(Propylene Imine) Dendrimer Modified with Acridine and Its Cu(II) Complex: Synthesis, Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity
Materials 2019, 12(18), 3020; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12183020 - 18 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
A second-generation poly(propylene imine) dendrimer modified with acridine and its Cu(II) complex have been synthesized for the first time. It has been found that two copper ions form complexes with the nitrogen atoms of the dendrimeric core by coordinate bonds. The new compounds [...] Read more.
A second-generation poly(propylene imine) dendrimer modified with acridine and its Cu(II) complex have been synthesized for the first time. It has been found that two copper ions form complexes with the nitrogen atoms of the dendrimeric core by coordinate bonds. The new compounds have been characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The spectral characteristics of the modified dendrimer have been measured in different organic solvents, and a negative fluorescence solvatochromism has been observed. The antimicrobial activity of the dendrimers has been tested against model pathogenic microorganisms in agar and by broth dilution method. The cotton fabric treated with both dendrimers has been evaluated towards pathogenic microorganisms. The obtained modified cotton fabrics have been shown to hamper bacterial growth and to prevent biofilm formation. Dendrimer cytotoxicity has been investigated in vitro in the model HEp-2 cell line. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Electrospinning of Fish Gelatin Solution Containing Citric Acid: An Environmentally Friendly Approach to Prepare Crosslinked Gelatin Fibers
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2808; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172808 - 01 Sep 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
The majority of the crosslinking approaches employed to confer water resistance properties to electrospun gelatin mats are based on the use of potential cytotoxic agents, turning out to be not suitable for biomedical applications. Environmentally friendly chemical strategies based on the use of [...] Read more.
The majority of the crosslinking approaches employed to confer water resistance properties to electrospun gelatin mats are based on the use of potential cytotoxic agents, turning out to be not suitable for biomedical applications. Environmentally friendly chemical strategies based on the use of non-toxic agents are, therefore, strongly demanded. In the present work, the possibility to produce crosslinked electrospun fish gelatin mats by electrospinning an aqueous solution, containing citric acid as a crosslinking agent, is reported. The effect of pH on solution rheological properties, as well as on the electrospun mat morphology, chemistry, and crosslinking degree, is assessed. The increase of solution pH from 1.8 to 3.7 allows for obtaining fibers that maintain the fibrous morphology also in the mat. Subsequent thermal treatment of the electrospun mat (80 °C for 30 min) turns out to increase the crosslinking degree and morphological stability of the mat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: A Novel Approach to Produce Bacterial Cellulose Hydrogels Loaded with Silver Nanoparticles Using Curcumin-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex for Wound Management Applications

Authors: Abhishek GUPTA, Sophie Marie BRIFFA, Hazel GIBSON, Marek KOWALCZUK, Weiguang WANG, Claire MARTIN, Xintao SHUAIF, Zecong Xiao and Iza RADECKA

2. Author: Martin Koller

3. Author: Artemis G. Stamboulis

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