Special Issue "Organic Transistors: Current Status and Opportunities"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mamatimin Abbas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CNRS Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France
Interests: Organic electronic devices: field effect transistors, organic solar cells, dye sensitized solar cells and photodetectors; Solution processed oxide thin film transistors; Thin film deposition techniques; X-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopies

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Organic semiconductors have the potential to make available printable, low-cost, flexible, and large-area devices, thus becoming a major research area in materials science. Chemical and device engineering together have ushered in considerable development in this field, where we have already witnessed the appearance, in full force, of organic light-emitting diodes in the market.

Being the backbone of the electronic circuits, organic transistors have also attracted enormous research attention. The performances of both vacuum and solution-processed organic transistors have far exceeded that of amorphous silicon. Their biocompatibility has provided a unique opportunity for their applications as sensing units in bioelectronics. The possibility of the integration of organic transistors in various opto-electronic components provides valuable opportunities to achieve the desired functions. However, there remain a number of challenges before their full potential can be exploited and become a driving force for future electronics. Their stability in various conditions has to go through rigorous tests. N-channel devices have to reach a similar performance as those of their p-channel counterparts, which is one major limiting factor for the development of organic circuits. Organic transistors as a potential candidate to realize an electrically pumped organic laser are to be explored further.

This Special Issue, “Organic Transistors: Current Status and Opportunities”, intends to provide a platform for the research community, where the current status of organic transistors will be highlighted through review articles and recent research results. Research results on any field where organic transistor is utilized can be considered for publication. The scope of this issue includes but is not limited to material synthesis/device evaluation, transistor stability, device simulation, transistor integration into bio/chemical/mechanical sensors, hybrid devices, etc.

Dr. Mamatimin Abbas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • organic synthesis
  • device performance
  • stability
  • simulation
  • sensors
  • hybrid devices
  • circuits

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
One-Volt, Solution-Processed Organic Transistors with Self-Assembled Monolayer-Ta2O5 Gate Dielectrics
Materials 2019, 12(16), 2563; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12162563 - 12 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Low-voltage, solution-processed organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) have tremendous potential to be key components in low-cost, flexible and large-area electronics. However, for these devices to operate at low voltage, robust and high capacitance gate dielectrics are urgently needed. Herein, the fabrication of OTFTs that [...] Read more.
Low-voltage, solution-processed organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) have tremendous potential to be key components in low-cost, flexible and large-area electronics. However, for these devices to operate at low voltage, robust and high capacitance gate dielectrics are urgently needed. Herein, the fabrication of OTFTs that operate at 1 V is reported. These devices comprise a solution-processed, self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modified tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) as the gate dielectric. The morphology and dielectric properties of the anodized Ta2O5 films with and without n-octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) SAM treatment have been studied. The thickness of the Ta2O5 film was optimized by varying the anodization voltage. The results show that organic TFTs gated with OTS-modified tantalum pentoxide anodized at 3 V (d ~7 nm) exhibit the best performance. The devices operate at 1 V with a saturation field-effect mobility larger than 0.2 cm2 V−1 s−1, threshold voltage −0.55 V, subthreshold swing 120 mV/dec, and current on/off ratio in excess of 5 × 103. As a result, the demonstrated OTFTs display a promising performance for applications in low-voltage, portable electronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Transistors: Current Status and Opportunities)
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