Special Issue "Multifunctional Coatings for Bone Regenerative Medicine"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Saber AminYavari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: surface bio-functionalization; additive manufacturing and prevention of implant failures
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aging population forces millions of people to undergo implant surgery for total hip and knee replacement, scoliosis, maxillofacial fixation, and traumatic condition. However, many of these implants fail due to (1) implant loosening: lack of necessary new bone formation to repair large bone defects or suitable integration with the existing bone and (2) implant-associated infection, despite a novel engineering design, sterilized operating theatre environment, and prophylaxis antibiotic therapy. To overcome these issues, different surface modification and coating strategies have been explored for decades. However, it remains a significant challenge to achieve an optimal biofunctionalized implant, mainly because they offer only a single functionality (either enhanced bone regeneration or antibacterial). On the other hand, because of recent progress in additive manufacturing technologies which allows researchers to design and fabricate rationally designed and topologically complex structures, it is now possible to introduce biomaterials with unprecedented combinations of mechanical, physical, and biological properties. Therefore, it is essential to focus on further developments in a new generation of biomaterials that offer multiple functionalities, including enhanced bone regeneration, infection prevention, and also render bespoke release profiles of the active agents to address unmet clinical needs.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the recent strategies in multifunctional coatings for bone regenerative medicine application. It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute your research article, communication or review for this Special Issue.

Dr. Saber AminYavari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Multifunctional coatings
  • Implant-associated infection
  • Osseointegration
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Additive manufacturing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Use of Therapeutic Pathogen Recognition Receptor Ligands for Osteo-Immunomodulation
Materials 2021, 14(5), 1119; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14051119 - 27 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 754
Abstract
Therapeutic pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) ligands are reaching clinical practice following their ability to skew the immune response in a specific direction. We investigated the effects of various therapeutic PRR ligands on bone cell differentiation and inflammation. Following stimulation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity [...] Read more.
Therapeutic pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) ligands are reaching clinical practice following their ability to skew the immune response in a specific direction. We investigated the effects of various therapeutic PRR ligands on bone cell differentiation and inflammation. Following stimulation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (Day 10), osteocalcin, osteonectin expression (Day 14), and calcium deposition (Day 21) were quantified in bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The osteoclastogenic response was determined by measuring tartrate-resistant acid phosphate (TRAP) activity in human monocytes. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 expressions were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as an indicator of the ligands’ inflammatory properties. We found that nucleic acid-based ligands Poly(I:C) and CpG ODN C increased early ALP activity in hMSCs by 4-fold without affecting osteoclast formation. These ligands did not enhance expression of the other, late osteogenic markers. MPLA, Curdlan, and Pam3CSK4 did not affect osteogenic differentiation, but inhibited TRAP activity in monocytes, which was associated with increased expression of all measured cytokines. Nucleic acid-based ligands are identified as the most promising osteo-immunomodulators, as they favor early osteogenic differentiation without inducing an exaggerated immune-cell mediated response or interfering in osteoclastogenesis and thus can be potentially harnessed for multifunctional coatings for bone biomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multifunctional Coatings for Bone Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Lactoferrin/Calcium Phosphate-Modified Porous Ti by Biomimetic Mineralization: Effective Infection Prevention and Excellent Osteoinduction
Materials 2021, 14(4), 992; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14040992 - 19 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 437
Abstract
The surface modification of titanium (Ti) can enhance the osseointegration and antibacterial properties of implants. In this study, we modified porous Ti discs with calcium phosphate (CaP) and different concentrations of Lactoferrin (LF) by biomimetic mineralization and examined their antibacterial effects and osteogenic [...] Read more.
The surface modification of titanium (Ti) can enhance the osseointegration and antibacterial properties of implants. In this study, we modified porous Ti discs with calcium phosphate (CaP) and different concentrations of Lactoferrin (LF) by biomimetic mineralization and examined their antibacterial effects and osteogenic bioactivity. Firstly, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the fluorescent tracing method, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the releasing kinetics of LF were utilized to characterize the modified Ti surface. Then, the antibacterial properties against S. sanguis and S. aureus were investigated. Finally, in vitro cytological examination was performed, including evaluations of cell adhesion, cell differentiation, extracellular matrix mineralization, and cytotoxicity. The results showed that the porous Ti discs were successfully modified with CaP and LF, and that the LF-M group (200 μg/mL LF in simulated body fluid) could mildly release LF under control. Further, the LF-M group could effectively inhibit the adhesion and proliferation of S. sanguis and S. aureus and enhance the osteogenic differentiation in vitro with a good biocompatibility. Consequently, LF-M-modified Ti may have potential applications in the field of dental implants to promote osseointegration and prevent the occurrence of peri-implantitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multifunctional Coatings for Bone Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
A Biodegradable Antifungal-Loaded Sol–Gel Coating for the Prevention and Local Treatment of Yeast Prosthetic-Joint Infections
Materials 2020, 13(14), 3144; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143144 - 15 Jul 2020
Viewed by 919
Abstract
Fungal prosthetic-joint infections are rare but devastating complications following arthroplasty. These infections are highly recurrent and expose the patient to the development of candidemia, which has high mortality rates. Patients with this condition are often immunocompromised and present several comorbidities, and thus pose [...] Read more.
Fungal prosthetic-joint infections are rare but devastating complications following arthroplasty. These infections are highly recurrent and expose the patient to the development of candidemia, which has high mortality rates. Patients with this condition are often immunocompromised and present several comorbidities, and thus pose a challenge for diagnosis and treatment. The most frequently isolated organisms in these infections are Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis, pathogens that initiate the infection by developing a biofilm on the implant surface. In this study, a novel hybrid organo–inorganic sol–gel coating was developed from a mixture of organopolysiloxanes and organophosphite, to which different concentrations of fluconazole or anidulafungin were added. Then, the capacity of these coatings to prevent biofilm formation and treat mature biofilms produced by reference and clinical strains of C. albicans and C. Parapsilosis was evaluated. Anidulafungin-loaded sol–gel coatings were more effective in preventing C. albicans biofilm formation, while fluconazole-loaded sol–gel prevented C. parapsilosis biofilm formation more effectively. Treatment with unloaded sol–gel was sufficient to reduce C. albicans biofilms, and the sol–gels loaded with fluconazole or anidulafungin slightly enhanced this effect. In contrast, unloaded coatings stimulated C. parapsilosis biofilm formation, and loading with fluconazole reduced these biofilms by up to 99%. In conclusion, these coatings represent a novel therapeutic approach with potential clinical use to prevent and treat fungal prosthetic-joint infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multifunctional Coatings for Bone Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Bone Regeneration in Critical-Sized Bone Defects Treated with Additively Manufactured Porous Metallic Biomaterials: The Effects of Inelastic Mechanical Properties
Materials 2020, 13(8), 1992; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13081992 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 949
Abstract
Additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials, in general, and AM porous titanium, in particular, have recently emerged as promising candidates for bone substitution. The porous design of such materials allows for mimicking the elastic mechanical properties of native bone tissue and showed to [...] Read more.
Additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials, in general, and AM porous titanium, in particular, have recently emerged as promising candidates for bone substitution. The porous design of such materials allows for mimicking the elastic mechanical properties of native bone tissue and showed to be effective in improving bone regeneration. It is, however, not clear what role the other mechanical properties of the bulk material such as ductility play in the performance of such biomaterials. In this study, we compared the bone tissue regeneration performance of AM porous biomaterials made from the commonly used titanium alloy Ti6Al4V-ELI with that of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). CP-Ti was selected because of its high ductility as compared to Ti6Al4V-ELI. Critical-sized (6 mm diameter) femoral defects in rats were treated with implants made from both Ti6Al4V-ELI and CP-Ti. Bone regeneration was assessed up to 11 weeks using micro-CT scanning. The regenerated bone volume was assessed ex vivo followed by histology and biomechanical testing to assess osseointegration of the implants. The bony defects treated with AM CP-Ti implants generally showed higher volumes of regenerated bone as compared to those treated with AM Ti6Al4V-ELI. The torsional strength of the two titanium groups were similar however, and both considerably lower than those measured for intact bony tissue. These findings show the importance of material type and ductility of the bulk material in the ability for bone tissue regeneration of AM porous biomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multifunctional Coatings for Bone Regenerative Medicine)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Tentative Title: The Potential of Clinically-Developed Adjuvants as Immune Enhancers of Orthopedic Implants
Authors:  Paree Khokhani 1; Nada Ristya Rahmani 1; Anne Kok 1; Koen Santing 1; Harrie Weinans 1; Jacqueline Alblas 1; Moyo Kruyt 1; J. van Strijp 2 and Michiel Croes 1
Affiliation:
1 Department of orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; (P.K.); (N.R.R.); (A.K.); (K.S.); (H.W.); (J.A.); (M.K.); (M.C.)
2 Department of medical microbiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; (J.V.S.)

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