Special Issue "Fiber Spinning: Materials & Techniques"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Valery Kulichikhin
Website
Guest Editor
Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
Interests: polymer physical chemistry; colloid chemistry; rheology; polymer processing; fiber spinning
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fiber spinning is one of the most complicated processes in the polymer processing area. First of all, it is connected with the preparation of very thin and weak filaments, their collection to threads (yarns), and the final processing to textile or technical fibers and fabrics. Fiber spinning from melts is easier than from polymer solutions, because when planning the subsequent processes, we need to overcome numerous issues connected with the choice of solvent, properties of solutions, and selection of spinning method (wet, dry–wet jet, and dry), including the spinneret geometry, nature of coagulant, washing, orientation, drying procedures, and so on. Using solution spinning liquids of different chemical compositions requires a detailed consideration of their regeneration and recuperation methods. The development of composite fibers is usually stipulated with combining one fiber in two or more polymers, coating the main fiber using a protective jacket, and introducing reinforcing or functional additives, such as disperse particles, fire retardants, biological additives, and others. Self-absorbable threads from polylactide, polyglycolide, and their copolymers, for use as surgical materials are also treated with a special coating that reduces the "sawing" effect when the material passes through the tissues, and also reduces the capillarity and fibrillation. In some cases, the solution method seems more attractive for preparing composite fibers because of the possibility of mixing two or more polymers in one fiber, to distribute uniformly solid or liquid additives at ambient conditions, to prepare reasonable precursors for carbon fibers. The most popular matter for precursors are cellulose or polyacrylonitrile fibers spun via solutions, as well as dopes that almost always contain additives. That is why preparing composite fibers requires knowledge of physical and colloid chemistry, thermodynamics, rheology, chemical technology, mechanics, and other branches of science.

All of these are the driving forces of the Special Issue of Materials.

Prof. Valery Kulichikhin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Fiber spinning
  • Polymer processing
  • Polymer physical chemistry
  • Colloid chemistry
  • Rheology
  • Ccomposite Fibers
  • Functional additives

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
New Approach to Preparation of Heat-Resistant “Lola-M” Fiber
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3490; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213490 - 25 Oct 2019
Abstract
A new approach to the synthesis of polynaphthoylenebenzimidazoles and heat resistant fiber spinning has been developed using an environmentally friendly and energy efficient method, which operates with solutions of pre-polymers based on 3,3’,4,4’-tetraaminodiphenyl ether and 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic acid dianhydride in N-methylpyrrolidone. Rheological properties of [...] Read more.
A new approach to the synthesis of polynaphthoylenebenzimidazoles and heat resistant fiber spinning has been developed using an environmentally friendly and energy efficient method, which operates with solutions of pre-polymers based on 3,3’,4,4’-tetraaminodiphenyl ether and 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic acid dianhydride in N-methylpyrrolidone. Rheological properties of polymer reaction solutions and appropriate coagulant mixtures were investigated for further wet spinning process. The coagulation process was investigated through microscopic observation of solution droplets which imitate jet/fiber cross section surrounded with coagulants of different composition. For the case of the most optimal viscoelastic properties of dopes the best coagulant was found to be a ternary mixture ethanol/water/NMP (20/10/70). Fibers were prepared through the wet spinning from pre-polymers of various molecular weight characterized by intrinsic viscosity. As a result, complex yarns were spun, and their morphology was characterized and mechanical properties were measured. The strength of ~300 MPa and elastic modulus of ~2 GPa and elongation at break of ~20% were reached for the best fibers at average diameter of ~20 µm. After heat treatment “Lola-M” fibers do not burn and do not support combustion in open flame. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Spinning: Materials & Techniques)
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