Special Issue "New Progress on Electron Microscopies for Characterizing Microstructures"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Structure Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Antoine GUITTON
Website
Guest Editor
Université de Lorraine –CNRS – Arts et Métiers ParisTech – LEM3, 7 rue Félix Savart, 57070 Metz, France
Interests: Deformation of materials, Physics of materials, Metallurgy, Microscopies, In-situ deformation testing coupled with diffraction techniques and with electron microscopies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mechanical tests followed by microstructural investigations bring valuable information for understanding the mechanical performance of materials. Electron microscopy is one of the most important techniques for analyzing deformation microstructures. Two kinds of electron microscopes bring complementary information: at the macro/meso-scopic scale, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and at micro/nano-scale, transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

Following the breakthroughs in materials science, the constant improvement of electron microscopy techniques tend to make them essential for bringing valuable information to understand the mechanical behavior of materials. This Special Issue aims to report some of the significant progress in the field of electron microscopy. Articles will cover major aspects of materials science: the development of revolutionary electron microscopy techniques, fundamental physical phenomena and of course their applications in materials science.

Dr. Antoine GUITTON
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microstructure characterization
  • Plasticity of materials
  • Mechanical behavior
  • Deformation mechanisms
  • SEM
  • TEM
  • Development of electron microscopy techniques
  • Fundamental physical phenomena

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
In Situ Macroscopic Tensile Testing in SEM and Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging: Pencil Glide Evidenced in a Bulk β-Ti21S Polycrystal
Materials 2019, 12(15), 2479; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12152479 - 04 Aug 2019
Abstract
In this paper, we report the successful combination of macroscopic uniaxial tensile testing of bulk specimen combined with In situ dislocation-scale observations of the evolution of deformation microstructures during loading at several stress states. The dislocation-scale observations were performed by Accurate Electron Channeling [...] Read more.
In this paper, we report the successful combination of macroscopic uniaxial tensile testing of bulk specimen combined with In situ dislocation-scale observations of the evolution of deformation microstructures during loading at several stress states. The dislocation-scale observations were performed by Accurate Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging in order to follow the defects evolution and their interactions with grain boundaries for several regions of interest during macroscopic loading. With this novel in situ procedure, the slip systems governing the deformation in polycrystalline bulk β-Ti21S are tracked during the macroscopic uniaxial tensile test. For instance, curved slip lines that are associated with “pencil glide” phenomenon and tangled dislocation networks are evidenced. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
In-Lens Band-Pass Filter for Secondary Electrons in Ultrahigh Resolution SEM
Materials 2019, 12(14), 2307; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12142307 - 19 Jul 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Scanning electron microscopes come equipped with different types of detectors for the collection of signal electrons emitted from samples. In-lens detection systems mostly consist of several auxiliary electrodes that help electrons to travel in a direction towards the detector. This paper aims to [...] Read more.
Scanning electron microscopes come equipped with different types of detectors for the collection of signal electrons emitted from samples. In-lens detection systems mostly consist of several auxiliary electrodes that help electrons to travel in a direction towards the detector. This paper aims to show that a through-the-lens detector in a commercial electron microscope Magellan 400 FEG can, under specific conditions, work as an energy band-pass filter of secondary electrons that are excited by the primary beam electrons. The band-pass filter properties verify extensive simulations of secondary and backscattered electrons in a precision 3D model of a microscope. A unique test sample demonstrates the effects of the band-pass filter on final image and contrast with chromium and silver stripes on a silicon substrate, manufactured by a combination of e-beam lithography, wet etching, and lift-off technique. The ray tracing of signal electrons in a detector model predicate that the through-the-lens detector works as a band-pass filter of the secondary electrons with an energy window of about 3 eV. By moving the energy window along the secondary electron energy spectrum curve of the analyzed material, we select the energy of the secondary electrons to be detected. Energy filtration brings a change in contrast in the image as well as displaying details that are not otherwise visible. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Modeling Dislocation Contrasts Obtained by Accurate-Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging for Characterizing Deformation Mechanisms in Bulk Materials
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1587; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101587 - 15 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI) is becoming a powerful tool in materials science for characterizing deformation defects. Dislocations observed by ECCI in scanning electron microscope exhibit several features depending on the crystal orientation relative to the incident beam (white/black line on a dark/bright [...] Read more.
Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI) is becoming a powerful tool in materials science for characterizing deformation defects. Dislocations observed by ECCI in scanning electron microscope exhibit several features depending on the crystal orientation relative to the incident beam (white/black line on a dark/bright background). In order to bring new insights concerning these contrasts, we report an original theoretical approach based on the dynamical diffraction theory. Our calculations led, for the first time, to an explicit formulation of the back-scattered intensity as a function of various physical and practical parameters governing the experiment. Intensity profiles are modeled for dislocations parallel to the sample surface for different channeling conditions. All theoretical predictions are consistent with experimental results. Full article
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