Special Issue "Biomedical Applications of Polyesters and Related Polymers"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jordi Puiggalí
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: structure of synthetic polymers; development of biodegradable polymers; study of nanocomposites; polymer physics; polymer crystallization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Aliphatic polyesters are nowadays the most competitive biodegradable polymers commercialized to date for biomedical speciality applications. Considerable research is however still necessary in order to improve the final properties of such materials and to properly meet requirements that are continuously becoming more specific and selective. Significant efforts are therefore being focused to attain unique material properties and to address specific issues related to both biocompatibility and biodegradability. This research includes the study of the change of properties during degradation and the evaluation of long-term host responses.

The chemical modification of functionalized polyesters is a possibility to achieve better properties including hydrophilicity, biodegradation rate or bioadhesion, to attach compounds with pharmacological activity or in general target the subsequent medical treatments. The incorporation of natural α-amino acids in a polyester main chain renders new polymers with amide groups and distinctive mechanical properties through the establishment of hydrogen bonding interactions.

This Special Issue of Materials aims to discuss, collect and offer recent highlights and advances on polyesters and related polymers (e.g., poly(ester amide)s, and poly(ester urea)s) for applications in the biomedical field. To this end, progress on the development of biodegradable and biocompatible elastomers, hyperbranched polymers, functional polymers for conjugating drugs or cell signalling molecules, hydrogels, non-viral delivery vectors, scaffolds with multiple functionalities, stent coatings, and bactericidal wound dressings materials science are some of the specific topics that should be considered.

Prof. Jordi Puiggalí
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polylactones
  • poly(hydroxyalkanoate)s
  • poly(alkylene dicarboxylates)
  • poly(ester amide)s
  • hyperbranched polymers
  • supramolecular hydrogels
  • nanomedicine
  • scaffolds
  • drug delivery systems
  • responsiveness

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Cell Responses to Electrical Pulse Stimulation for Anticancer Drug Release
Materials 2019, 12(16), 2633; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12162633 - 19 Aug 2019
Abstract
Electrical stimulation is an attractive approach to tune on-demand drug release in the body as it relies on simple setups and requires typically 1 V or less. Although many studies have been focused on the development of potential smart materials for electrically controlled [...] Read more.
Electrical stimulation is an attractive approach to tune on-demand drug release in the body as it relies on simple setups and requires typically 1 V or less. Although many studies have been focused on the development of potential smart materials for electrically controlled drug release, as well as on the exploration of different delivery mechanisms, progress in the field is slow because the response of cells exposed to external electrical stimulus is frequently omitted from such investigations. In this work, we monitor the behavior of prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3 and MCF7, respectively) exposed to electroactive platforms loaded with curcumin, a hydrophobic anticancer drug. These consist in conducting polymer nanoparticles, which release drug molecules by altering their interactions with polymer, and electrospun polyester microfibres that contain electroactive nanoparticles able to alter the porosity of the matrix through an electro-mechanical actuation mechanism. The response of the cells against different operating conditions has been examined considering their viability, metabolism, spreading and shape. Results have allowed us to differentiate the damage induced in the cell by the electrical stimulation from other effects, as for example, the anticancer activity of curcumin and/or the presence of curcumin-loaded nanoparticles or fibres, demonstrating that these kinds of platforms can be effective when the dosage of the drug occurs under restricted conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Applications of Polyesters and Related Polymers)
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Open AccessArticle
Isothermal Crystallization Kinetics of Poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) Biopolymer
Materials 2019, 12(15), 2488; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12152488 - 06 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Thermal properties and crystallization kinetics of poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) (P4HB) have been studied. The polymer shows the typical complex melting behavior associated to different lamellar populations. Annealing processes had great repercussions on properties and the morphology of constitutive lamellae as verified by X-ray scattering data. [...] Read more.
Thermal properties and crystallization kinetics of poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) (P4HB) have been studied. The polymer shows the typical complex melting behavior associated to different lamellar populations. Annealing processes had great repercussions on properties and the morphology of constitutive lamellae as verified by X-ray scattering data. Kinetics of isothermal crystallization was evaluated by both polarizing optical microscopy (POM) and calorimetric (DSC) measurements, which indicated a single crystallization regime. P4HB rendered banded spherulites with a negative birefringence when crystallized from the melt. Infrared microspectroscopy was applied to determine differences on the molecular orientation inside a specific ring according to the spherulite sectorization or between different rings along a determined spherulitic radius. Primary nucleation was increased during crystallization and when temperature decreased. Similar crystallization parameters were deduced from DSC and POM analyses (e.g., secondary nucleation parameters of 1.69 × 105 K2 and 1.58 × 105 K2, respectively). The effect of a sporadic nucleation was therefore minimized in the experimental crystallization temperature range and a good proportionality between overall crystallization rate (k) and crystal growth rate (G) was inferred. Similar bell-shaped curves were postulated to express the temperature dependence of both k and G rates, corresponding to the maximum of these curves close to a crystallization temperature of 14–15 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Applications of Polyesters and Related Polymers)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Incorporation of Bacteriophages into Hydrogels based on Poly(g-glutamic acid)

Authors: Hamidreza Kasbayan, Estelle Simaud, Lourdes Franco, Luis J. del Valle and Jordi Puiggalí

2. Title: Modification of Poly(lactic) Acid by Reactive Extrusion and Its Melt-Blending with Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene

Authors: M. Sánchez-Soto, M.R. Kamrani, J. Cailloux, T. Abt, O.O. Santana and M. Ll. Maspoch

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