Special Issue "Advances in Alloys Used in Dentistry"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Lavinia Cosmina Ardelean
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Technology of Materials and Devices in Dental Medicine, “Victor Babes” University of Medicine and Pharmacy from Timisoara, Romania
Interests: dental materials; dental alloys; dental ceramics; 3D printing in dentistry; CAD/CAM milling in dentistry; corrosion evaluation; dental thermoplastic resins; welding in dentistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to the forthcoming Special Issue “Advances in Alloys Used in Dentistry” in Materials (Impact Factor 2.467).

Starting with the 20th century, alloys have been increasingly used for prosthetic restorations as well as for surgically implanted medical devices. The field of dental alloys is very extensive, encompassing both the materials themselves and the manufacturing methods, which are constantly developing.

Their properties, behavior, and corrosion resistance are of great importance for the success of the prosthetic treatment. In the past, the use of high-nobility alloys generally ensured the quality of fixed partial dentures. However, later on, the increased use of low-nobility or base alloys, due to economic reasons, led to problems regarding their chemical stability, and more attention was paid to their quantification, in terms of corrosion behavior. Dental alloys must have an appropriate corrosion resistance in order to avoid the release of cytotoxic or sensitizing elements into the biological milieu and the presence of a high risk in developing reactions to common or specific allergens. The biocompatibility of dental alloys is of great importance because they are in long-term intimate contact with oral tissues. This is applicable for all types of alloys that are in contact with human tissues. Good corrosion resistance is an important criterion for alloy selection, and influences other alloy properties, such as esthetics and strength.

Both the manufacturing and environmental conditions are of great importance.

Alternatives such as CAD/CAM milling or 3D printing technologies (e.g., direct metal laser sintering, selective laser sintering, selective laser melting, and electron beam melting are now available and trending to take over traditional casting techniques, which are laborious and time-consuming.

The aim of this Special Issue is to give an updated outlook on dental alloys and other types of alloys which are in prolonged contact with human tissues, as well as traditional and innovative manufacturing technologies. It represents a good opportunity for researchers around the world to disseminate different aspects of their work and report their results related to this topic.

Research articles, review articles, and communications are invited for this Special Issue.

Prof. Lavinia Cosmina Ardelean
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • manufacturing technologies for dental alloys
  • 3D printing of dental alloys
  • CAD/CAM milling of dental alloys
  • welding of dental alloys
  • types of alloys for dental use
  • corrosion evaluation of dental alloys
  • biocompatibility of dental alloys
  • properties of dental alloys
  • alloys in contact with human tissues

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analysis of the Corrosion Resistance of Titanium Alloys Intended to Come into Direct or Prolonged Contact with Live Tissues
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2841; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172841 - 03 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The evaluation of the biological safety and degradation of materials is quite important for risk assessment in various biomedical applications. In this study, two procedures were followed to characterize the corrosion resistance of different Ti-based alloys. The first one consisted of performing specific [...] Read more.
The evaluation of the biological safety and degradation of materials is quite important for risk assessment in various biomedical applications. In this study, two procedures were followed to characterize the corrosion resistance of different Ti-based alloys. The first one consisted of performing specific electrochemical tests (open circuit potential, linear resistance polarization, Tafel plots, potentiodynamic polarization) in order to highlight their behavior to the general and localized corrosion. The static and dynamic fatigue cycles combined with crevice corrosion conducted on a new prototype have completed the study. The second procedure followed was a cations extraction investigation (by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) in order to verify the ionic permeability of the oxides layers formed on the surfaces. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used for surface analysis. It was noticed that in these two electrolytes, the bulk Ti-based alloys presented an almost similar general corrosion behavior. The small differences of behavior for Ti6Al4V scaffolds were correlated to the surface oxidation and roughness (owing to the selective laser melting process). The Ti alloys presented no traces of localized corrosion at the end of the test. The fatigue cycles revealed that a strong and adhesive oxides film was formed during the static cycles (difficult to remove even during the depassivation steps). The concentration of cations released was at the detection limit, revealing very good passivation films, in adequacy with the all the other results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Alloys Used in Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steels Intended to Come into Direct or Prolonged Contact with the Skin
Materials 2019, 12(6), 987; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12060987 - 25 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The biocompatibility of materials in contact with a living tissue becomes a puzzle in the overall picture of assessing the toxic effects of chemicals that come into contact with us. Allergic reactions to substances are a significant and growing health problem affecting large [...] Read more.
The biocompatibility of materials in contact with a living tissue becomes a puzzle in the overall picture of assessing the toxic effects of chemicals that come into contact with us. Allergic reactions to substances are a significant and growing health problem affecting large parts of the population in Europe. Wristwatches are objects worn in prolonged contact with the skin, being subject to localized corrosion, especially pitting and crevice types, in sulfide-chloride medium, and high wear in the bracelets joints. Watches of medium quality are usually made of stainless steels. The X2 CrNiMo 17-12-2 316L grade as well as X1 CrNiMo 20-25-5 Cu 1 or 904L are commonly used, having good resistance to generalized corrosion. The passive layer is nevertheless insufficient to ensure complete immunity in all cases of localized corrosion encountered during wear. For this reason, a high-corrosion-resistant steel: X1 CrNiMo 18-15-4 N 0.15 or 317LMN, from three different suppliers was evaluated. Metallographic characterization was carried out. The corrosion behavior evaluation was performed for the generalized corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion. Galvanic couples steel 317LMN-gold 18K alloy 3N and gold 18K 5M were used. The results of the generalized and pitting corrosion test indicated three basic groups. All of the 317LMNs were similar. The 316L variants tested noticeably worse. The 904Ls were difficult to discern, but certainly easier than the 316Ls and, possibly, at least comparable to the 317LMNs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Alloys Used in Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of the Elastic Modulus on the Osseointegration of Dental Implants
Materials 2019, 12(6), 980; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12060980 - 25 Mar 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
The load transfer from metallic prosthesis to tissue plays an important role in the success of a designed device. From a mechanical behavior point of view, the load transfer will be favored when the elastic modulus between the metallic implant and the bone [...] Read more.
The load transfer from metallic prosthesis to tissue plays an important role in the success of a designed device. From a mechanical behavior point of view, the load transfer will be favored when the elastic modulus between the metallic implant and the bone tissue are similar. Titanium and Ti-6Al-4V are the most commonly used metals and alloys in the field of dental implants, although they present high elastic moduli and hence trigger bone resorption. We propose the use of low-modulus β-type titanium alloys that can improve the growth of new bone surrounding the implant. We designed dental implants with identical morphology and micro-roughness composed of: Ti-15Zr, Ti-19.1Nb-8.8Zr, Ti-41.2Nb-6.1Zr, and Ti-25Hf-25Ta. The commercially pure Ti cp and Ti-6Al-4V were used as control samples. The alloys were initially mechanically characterized with a tensile test using a universal testing machine. The results showed the lowest elastic modulus for the Ti-25Hf-25Ta alloy. We implanted a total of six implants in the mandible (3) and maxilla (3) for each titanium alloy in six minipigs and evaluated their bone index contact (i.e., the percentage of new bone in contact with the metal—BIC%) after 3 and 6 weeks of implantation. The results showed higher BIC% for the dental implants with lowest elastic modulus, showing the importance of decreasing the elastic modulus of alloys for the successful osseointegration of dental implants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Alloys Used in Dentistry)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Planned Paper 1

Custom-made 3D printed subperiosteal titanium implants for the prosthetic restoration of the posterior mandible: a case series.

Mangano C, Mangano F, Margiani B, Admakin O.

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