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Advanced Electrical Engineering Materials and Devices

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 3770

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Prospective Technology of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan
Interests: transparent conduction oxide thin films; fluorescent materials; inorganic optical multi-layer film

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electrical engineering covers a wide range of different fields, including computer engineering, systems engineering, power engineering, telecommunications, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, photovoltaic cells, electronics, and optics and photonics. Similarly, materials and myriad devices in the electronic engineering field pervade our society with diverse applications in nearly every sector of modern life.

This Special Issue focuses on the new developments in electrical engineering materials, and we welcome articles, communications, and reviews on the state of the art in the electrical engineering field, such as basic engineering materials and devices such as conductors, semiconductors, insulators, magnetic materials, etc. Meanwhile, novel materials/structures and physics-related materials science utilized in the application of electrical engineering are also welcomed. Topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Electrical engineering materials and devices;
  • Electrical circuits and devices, with components such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, and transistors, etc.;
  • Conductive/superconducting, dielectric, insulating materials and devices;
  • Semiconductor materials and power devices;
  • Magnetic (ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, diamagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferrites, etc.) materials and devices;
  • Energy storage/conversion (photovoltaic, thermo-electric, electro-chemical) materials and devices;
  • Photonics and optics;
  • Fiber optic devices and systems;
  • Micro-/nano-electronics and computer technology;
  • Communications and information processing;
  • Signal processing and microwave engineering.

Prof. Dr. Hung-Cheng Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • electrical engineering
  • electrical circuits and devices
  • conductive materials
  • semiconductor materials and devices
  • magnetic materials and devices
  • energy storage and conversion systems
  • photonics and optics
  • fiber optic systems
  • microelectronics and nanoelectronics

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 7749 KiB  
Article
Area-Controlled Soft Contact Probe: Non-Destructive Robust Electrical Contact with 2D and Fragile Materials
by Michiko Yoshitake, Kaori Omata and Hideyuki Kanematsu
Materials 2024, 17(5), 1194; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17051194 - 4 Mar 2024
Viewed by 577
Abstract
We developed a soft contact probe capable of making electrical contact with a specimen without causing damage. This probe is now commercially available. However, the contact area with the probe changes according to the pressure applied during electric contact, potentially affecting electric measurements [...] Read more.
We developed a soft contact probe capable of making electrical contact with a specimen without causing damage. This probe is now commercially available. However, the contact area with the probe changes according to the pressure applied during electric contact, potentially affecting electric measurements when current density or electric field strength is critical. To address this, we developed methods to control the area of electric contact. This article reports on these methods, as well as variations in probe size, pressure for electric contact, probe materials, and attachment to commercial probers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Electrical Engineering Materials and Devices)
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19 pages, 26077 KiB  
Article
Physical Characteristics of Sintered Silver Nanoparticle Inks with Different Sizes during Furnace Sintering
by Hyeong-Jin Park, Kyongtae Ryu, Hee-Lak Lee, Yoon-Jae Moon, Jun Young Hwang and Seung Jae Moon
Materials 2024, 17(5), 978; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17050978 - 20 Feb 2024
Viewed by 560
Abstract
The influence of nanoparticle (NP) size on the physical characteristics of sintered silver NP ink was studied using four different types of inks. The Ag NP inks were spin-coated on glass substrates with an average thickness of 300 nm. Each sample was sintered [...] Read more.
The influence of nanoparticle (NP) size on the physical characteristics of sintered silver NP ink was studied using four different types of inks. The Ag NP inks were spin-coated on glass substrates with an average thickness of 300 nm. Each sample was sintered for 30 min, with temperatures from 50 °C to 400 °C by an interval of 50 °C. After sintering, the specific resistance of each case was obtained using the resistance and surface profile measurements. The minimum specific resistance obtained by the experiment was 2.6 μΩ·cm in the case in which 50 nm-sized Ag NP ink was sintered at 350 °C. The transformed surface morphology and grain size of each case were observed using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results of this study can be a reference for future manufacturers in selecting the Ag NP size and the sintering temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Electrical Engineering Materials and Devices)
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15 pages, 2157 KiB  
Article
Investigation of the Chemiluminescent Reaction of a Fluorinated Analog of Marine Coelenterazine
by Carla M. Magalhães, Joaquim C. G. Esteves da Silva and Luís Pinto da Silva
Materials 2024, 17(4), 868; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17040868 - 13 Feb 2024
Viewed by 625
Abstract
Bioluminescence (BL) and chemiluminescence (CL) are remarkable processes in which light is emitted due to (bio)chemical reactions. These reactions have attracted significant attention for various applications, such as biosensing, bioimaging, and biomedicine. Some of the most relevant and well-studied BL/CL systems are that [...] Read more.
Bioluminescence (BL) and chemiluminescence (CL) are remarkable processes in which light is emitted due to (bio)chemical reactions. These reactions have attracted significant attention for various applications, such as biosensing, bioimaging, and biomedicine. Some of the most relevant and well-studied BL/CL systems are that of marine imidazopyrazine-based compounds, among which Coelenterazine is a prime example. Understanding the mechanisms behind efficient chemiexcitation is essential for the optimization and development of practical applications for these systems. Here, the CL of a fluorinated Coelenterazine analog was studied using experimental and theoretical approaches to obtain insight into these processes. Experimental analysis revealed that CL is more efficient under basic conditions than under acidic ones, which could be attributed to the higher relative chemiexcitation efficiency of an anionic dioxetanone intermediate over a corresponding neutral species. However, theoretical calculations indicated that the reactions of both species are similarly associated with both electron and charge transfer processes, which are typically used to explain efficiency chemiexcitation. So, neither process appears to be able to explain the relative chemiexcitation efficiencies observed. In conclusion, this study provides further insight into the mechanisms behind the chemiexcitation of imidazopyrazinone-based systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Electrical Engineering Materials and Devices)
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13 pages, 3768 KiB  
Article
Implementation of Artificial Synapse Using IGZO-Based Resistive Switching Device
by Seongmin Kim, Dongyeol Ju and Sungjun Kim
Materials 2024, 17(2), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17020481 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 869
Abstract
In this study, we present the resistive switching characteristics and the emulation of a biological synapse using the ITO/IGZO/TaN device. The device demonstrates efficient energy consumption, featuring low current resistive switching with minimal set and reset voltages. Furthermore, we establish that the device [...] Read more.
In this study, we present the resistive switching characteristics and the emulation of a biological synapse using the ITO/IGZO/TaN device. The device demonstrates efficient energy consumption, featuring low current resistive switching with minimal set and reset voltages. Furthermore, we establish that the device exhibits typical bipolar resistive switching with the coexistence of non-volatile and volatile memory properties by controlling the compliance during resistive switching phenomena. Utilizing the IGZO-based RRAM device with an appropriate pulse scheme, we emulate a biological synapse based on its electrical properties. Our assessments include potentiation and depression, a pattern recognition system based on neural networks, paired-pulse facilitation, excitatory post-synaptic current, and spike-amplitude dependent plasticity. These assessments confirm the device’s effective emulation of a biological synapse, incorporating both volatile and non-volatile functions. Furthermore, through spike-rate dependent plasticity and spike-timing dependent plasticity of the Hebbian learning rules, high-order synapse imitation was done. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Electrical Engineering Materials and Devices)
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13 pages, 4599 KiB  
Communication
A Superparaelectric State in Relaxor Ferroelectric (Sr,Bi)TiO3-Bi(Mg,Ti)O3-Modified BaTiO3 Ceramics to Achieve High Energy Storage Performance
by Il-Ryeol Yoo, Seong-Hui Choi, Je-Yeon Park, Min-Seok Kim, Arun Kumar Yadav and Kyung-Hoon Cho
Materials 2024, 17(2), 426; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17020426 - 15 Jan 2024
Viewed by 920
Abstract
Dielectric ceramic capacitors are highly regarded for their rapid charge–discharge, high power density, and cyclability in various advanced applications. However, their relatively low energy storage density has prompted intensive research aiming at developing materials with a higher energy density. To enhance energy storage [...] Read more.
Dielectric ceramic capacitors are highly regarded for their rapid charge–discharge, high power density, and cyclability in various advanced applications. However, their relatively low energy storage density has prompted intensive research aiming at developing materials with a higher energy density. To enhance energy storage properties, research has focused on modifying ferroelectric materials to induce relaxor ferroelectricity. The present study aims to induce a superparaelectric (SPE) state in relaxor ferroelectrics near room temperature by altering BaTiO3 ferroelectric ceramics using the (Sr,Bi)TiO3-Bi(Mg0.5Ti0.5)O3 system ((1−x)BT-x(SBT-BMT)). X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy analysis demonstrated a shift in the crystal structure from tetragonal to cubic with an increasing x content. Notably, the compositions (except x = 0.1) satisfied the criteria for the SPE state manifestation near room temperature. The x = 0.2 specimen displayed characteristics at the boundary between the relaxor ferroelectric and SPE phases, while x ≥ 0.3 specimens exhibited increased SPE state fractions. Despite reduced maximum polarization, x ≥ 0.3 specimens showcased impressive energy storage capabilities, attributed to the enhanced SPE state, especially for x = 0.3, with impressive characteristics: a recoverable energy density (Wrec) of ~1.12 J/cm3 and efficiency (η) of ~94% at 170 kV/cm applied field. The good stability after the charge–discharge cycles reinforces the significance of the SPE phase in augmenting energy storage in relaxor ferroelectric materials, suggesting potential applications in high-energy density storage devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Electrical Engineering Materials and Devices)
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