Special Issue "Novel Bioderived Composites from Wastes"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Andrea Petrella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, Edile, del Territorio e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Via E. Orabona, 4, 70125, Bari, Italy
Interests: use of recycling organic and inorganic materials in the building trade and/or in the removal of heavy metals present in wastewater; photocatalytic materials for the degradation of bio-persistent pollutants in water and wastewater; nanocomposites for energy conversion and for novel optical devices
Dr. Marco Race
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Via Di Biasio, 43, 03043 Cassino, FR, Italy
Interests: soil reclamation; chelating agent; potential toxic metals; phytoremediation; remobilization; wastewater treatment; adsorption; solid waste management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Danilo Spasiano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, Edile, del Territorio e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Via E. Orabona, 4, 70125, Bari, Italy
Interests: nanomaterials; wastewater treatment; adsorption; solid waste management; soil remediation; photodegradation; degradation; wastewater reuse
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recovery of solid wastes for the preparation of innovative composite materials not only represents an economic advantage, but also offers an ecological opportunity for the utilization of by-products which would otherwise be landfilled. Specifically, the reuse and recycling of waste leads to important savings of raw materials and energy, since these by-products, generally deriving from agricultural or industrial activities, are abundant in nature. Moreover, a reduction of the environmental and related sanitary impacts can be also achieved.

For this reason, a recycling operation is fundamental for the improvement of the environmental sustainability because these secondary raw materials become a resource that can be easily reused without modification of the peculiar characteristics in order to obtain new and performing composites with a low specific weight, high durability, and long life cycle. To this end, it is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Andrea Petrella
Prof. Marco Race
Prof. Danilo Spasiano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Environmentally Sustainable Cement Composites Based on End-of-Life Tyre Rubber and Recycled Waste Porous Glass
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3289; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203289 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
In this paper, environmentally sustainable cement mortars were prepared with end-of-life tyre rubber (TR) and recycled waste porous glass (PG) as aggregates in order to obtain lightweight products characterized by renewable and not-pretreated materials specifically for indoor applications. The secondary raw materials were [...] Read more.
In this paper, environmentally sustainable cement mortars were prepared with end-of-life tyre rubber (TR) and recycled waste porous glass (PG) as aggregates in order to obtain lightweight products characterized by renewable and not-pretreated materials specifically for indoor applications. The secondary raw materials were added as partial and/or total replacement of the conventional sand aggregate. The resulting lightweight specimens were characterized by rheological, mechanical, thermal, microstructural and wettability tests. Fine tyre rubber aggregates affected the cohesiveness of the composites, as opposite to coarse tyre rubber and porous glass. The flexural and the compressive strengths of the porous glass samples were higher than the tyre rubber samples because of the higher stiffness and good adhesion of the glass to the cement paste as observed by microstructural observations. On the contrary, an unfavorable adhesion of the tyre aggregates to the cement paste was observed, together with discrete cracks after failure without separation of the two parts of the specimens. The latter result can explain the best results obtained by tyre rubber mortars in the case of impact compression tests where the super-elastic properties of the elastomeric material were evidenced by a deep groove before complete failure. Moreover, the thermal conductivity decrease of the lightweight porous TR and PG composites was in the range of ~80–90% with respect to the sand-based samples, which suggests that they can be used as plasters and masonries, and, in the case of tyre rubber specimens, outside applications are not excluded as observed from the wettability tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Bioderived Composites from Wastes)
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Open AccessArticle
Nanosilica Extracted from Hexafluorosilicic Acid of Waste Fertilizer as Reinforcement Material for Natural Rubber: Preparation and Mechanical Characteristics
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2707; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172707 - 23 Aug 2019
Abstract
Nanosilica particles are extracted from waste water containing a hexafluorosilicic acid discharged from Vietnamese fertilizer plants as an effective way not only to reduce waste water pollution but also to enhance the value of their waste water. Amorphous nanosilica particles are produced with [...] Read more.
Nanosilica particles are extracted from waste water containing a hexafluorosilicic acid discharged from Vietnamese fertilizer plants as an effective way not only to reduce waste water pollution but also to enhance the value of their waste water. Amorphous nanosilica particles are produced with diameters ranging from 40 to 60 nm and then adopted as a reinforcing additive for natural rubber (NR) composites. Morphological, mechanical, rheological, and thermal behaviors of the nanosilica-added NR composites are examined. Especially, mechanical behaviors of nanosilica-filled NR composites reach the optimum with 3 phr of nanosilica, at which its tensile strength, hardness, and decomposition temperature are improved by 20.6%, 7.1%, and 2.5%, respectively, compared with the pristine vulcanized NR. The improved mechanical properties can be explained by the tensile fractured surface morphology, which shows that the silica-filled NR is rougher than the pristine natural rubber sample. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Bioderived Composites from Wastes)
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Open AccessArticle
Micron-Size White Bamboo Fibril-Based Silane Cellulose Aerogel: Fabrication and Oil Absorbent Characteristics
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1407; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091407 - 30 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Micron-size white bamboo fibrils were fabricated from white bamboo and used as a source for the production of highly porous and very lightweight cellulose aerogels for use as a potential oil absorbent. The aerogels were fabricated through gelation from an aqueous alkali hydroxide/urea [...] Read more.
Micron-size white bamboo fibrils were fabricated from white bamboo and used as a source for the production of highly porous and very lightweight cellulose aerogels for use as a potential oil absorbent. The aerogels were fabricated through gelation from an aqueous alkali hydroxide/urea solution, followed by a conventional freeze-drying process. The morphology and physical properties of the aerogels were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, respectively. Successful silanization of the cellulose aerogel was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements. The fabricated silane cellulose aerogel exhibited excellent absorption performance for various oil and organic solvents with typical weight gains ranging from 400% to 1200% of their own dry weight, making them promising versatile absorbents for a range of applications, including water purification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Bioderived Composites from Wastes)
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Open AccessArticle
Study of the Suitability of Different Types of Slag and Its Influence on the Quality of Green Grouts Obtained by Partial Replacement of Cement
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1166; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071166 - 10 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper is part of a research line focused on the reduction of the use of cement in the industry. In this work, the study of work methodologies for the manufacture of green cementitious grout mixtures is studied. Grout is widely used in [...] Read more.
This paper is part of a research line focused on the reduction of the use of cement in the industry. In this work, the study of work methodologies for the manufacture of green cementitious grout mixtures is studied. Grout is widely used in construction and it requires an important use of raw materials. On the other hand, the steel industry faces the problem of the growing generation of slag wastes due to the increase in steel manufacturing. The green grout aims to achieve the dual objective of reducing the demand for cement and improve the slag waste valorization. Slag is not introduced as an aggregate but through the direct replacement of cement and no additives. The research seeks a product where we can use steel slag intensively, guaranteeing minimum resistance and workability. Results with substitutions between a 25% to 50% and water/cement ratio of 1 are presented. In particular, the suitability of different slags (two Ladle Furnace Slag (LFS) and one Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS)) in the quality of the final product are analyzed. The feasibility of replacing cement with slag and the importance of the origin and pretreatment are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Bioderived Composites from Wastes)
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Open AccessArticle
Rapid Immobilization of Simulated Radioactive Soil Waste Using Self-Propagating Synthesized Gd2Ti2O7 Pyrochlore Matrix
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1163; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071163 - 10 Apr 2019
Abstract
A rapid and effective method is necessary in the disposal of severely radioactive contaminated soil waste. Simulated Ce-bearing radioactive soil waste was immobilized by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) within 5 min in this study. The main work includes the rapid synthesis of soil [...] Read more.
A rapid and effective method is necessary in the disposal of severely radioactive contaminated soil waste. Simulated Ce-bearing radioactive soil waste was immobilized by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) within 5 min in this study. The main work includes the rapid synthesis of soil waste forms, the analysis of phase composition, microstructure and chemical durability. These results show that the simulated nuclide Ce was successfully immobilized into the pyrochlore-rich waste matrice, whose main phases are SiO2, pyrochlore (Gd2Ti2O7) and Cu. The normalized leaching rates of Si and Na on the 42nd day are 1.86 × 10−3 and 1.63 × 10−2 g·m−2·d−1, respectively. And the normalized leaching rate of Ce also remains at low level (10−5–10−6 g·m−2·d−1) within 42 days. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Bioderived Composites from Wastes)
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