Special Issue "Materials and Processes for Sustainable Energy and Environmental Systems"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Natalia Howaniec
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Advanced Energy Technologies, Department of Energy Saving and Air Protection, Central Mining Institute, Pl. Gwarkow 1, 40-166 Katowice, Poland
Interests: clean coal technologies; CCUS; hydrogen; renewable energy; environmental engineering; carbon materials; sorbent materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this world of depleting natural resources, increasing energy demand, and severe environmental issues, the development of materials and processes for sustainable energy and environmental systems is of special importance. Numerous advancements have been made in terms of low-emission energy systems development as well as greenhouse gas emission mitigation, waste valorization into added value products, and energy efficiency improvements in various sectors of the economy. The progress in rational and efficient resource use as well as in the development of advanced functional materials for energy and environmental applications is evident. Nevertheless, a more interdisciplinary approach in power, material, chemical, and environmental engineering is still needed to build up a synergetic effect for a sustainable future.

The aim of this Special Issue entitled “Materials and Processes for Sustainable Energy and Environmental Systems” is to present the recent advancements in various aspects related to materials and processes contributing to the creation of sustainable power systems and environmental solutions, particularly applicable to clean energy developments. These include materials and engineering processes for clean coal technologies, carbon capture and utilization, hydrogen economy, functional carbon materials, advanced energy materials, as well as waste and by-products valorization in energy systems and environmental engineering.

The authors of full research papers, communications, and review papers are invited to contribute to this Special Issue.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Natalia Howaniec
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • clean energy systems
  • carbon capture and utilization
  • clean coal technologies
  • hydrogen economy
  • carbon materials for energy and environmental applications
  • energy materials
  • waste and by-products valorization in energy and environmental systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Real-Time Corrosion Monitoring of AISI 1010 Carbon Steel with Metal Surface Mapping in Sulfolane
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3276; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193276 - 08 Oct 2019
Abstract
Solvents are widely used in organic synthesis. Sulfolane is a five-membered heterocyclic organosulfur sulfone (R-SO2-R’, where R/R’ is alkyl, alkenyl, or aryl) and an anthropogenic medium commonly used as industrial extractive solvent in the liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor extraction processes. Under standard [...] Read more.
Solvents are widely used in organic synthesis. Sulfolane is a five-membered heterocyclic organosulfur sulfone (R-SO2-R’, where R/R’ is alkyl, alkenyl, or aryl) and an anthropogenic medium commonly used as industrial extractive solvent in the liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor extraction processes. Under standard conditions sulfolane is not aggressive towards steel, but at higher temperatures and in oxygen, water, or chlorides presence, it can be decomposed into some corrosive (by-)products with generation of SO2 and subsequent formation of corrosive H2SO3. This pilot-case study provides data from laboratory measurements performed in low conductivity sulfolane-based fluids using an industrial multi-electrochemical technique for reliable detection of corrosion processes. In particular, a comprehensive evaluation of the aqueous phase impact on general and localized corrosion of AISI 1010 carbon steel in sulfolane is presented. Assessment of corrosive damage was carried out using an open circuit potential method, potentiodynamic polarization curves, SEM/EDS and scanning Kelvin probe technique. It was found that an increase in the water content (1–3 vol.%) in sulfolane causes a decrease in the corrosion resistance of AISI 1010 carbon steel on both uniform and pitting corrosion due to higher conductance of the sulfolane-based fluids. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Bioconversion of Sewage Sludge to Bio-Fuel: The Environmental and Economic Benefits
Materials 2019, 12(15), 2417; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12152417 - 29 Jul 2019
Abstract
This paper aims to analyze the economic feasibility of generating a novel, innovative biofuel—bioenergy—obtained from deposit bio-components by means of a pilot installation of sewage sludge bio-conversion. Fuel produced from sewage sludge biomass bears the potential of being considered a renewable energy source. [...] Read more.
This paper aims to analyze the economic feasibility of generating a novel, innovative biofuel—bioenergy—obtained from deposit bio-components by means of a pilot installation of sewage sludge bio-conversion. Fuel produced from sewage sludge biomass bears the potential of being considered a renewable energy source. In the present study, 23 bioconversion cycles were conducted taking into consideration the different contents, types of high carbohydrate additives, moisture content of the mixture as well as the shape of the bed elements. The biofuel was produced using post fermentation sewage sludge for industrial energy and heat generation. Based on the presented research it was concluded that the composite biofuel can be co-combusted with hard coal with the optimal percentage share within the range of 20–30% w/w. Sewage sludge stabilized by means of anaerobic digestion carried out in closed fermentation chambers is the final product. The average values of the CO2, CO, NO, NOx and SO2 concentrations in flue gas from co-combustion of a bioconversion product (20% w/w) and coal were 5.43%, 1903 ppm, 300 ppm, 303 ppm and 179 ppm, respectively. In total, within a period of 4.5 years of the plant operation, 1853 Mg of fuel was produced and successfully co-combusted with coal in a power plant. The research demonstrated that in the waste water treatment sector there exists energy potential in terms of calorific value which translates into tangible benefits both in the context of energy generation as well as environmental protection. Over 700,000 Mg of bio-sewage sludge is generated annually in Poland. According to findings of the study presented in the paper, the proposed solution could give 970,000 Mg of dry mass of biomass qualified as energy biomass replacing fossil fuels. Full article
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