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Advanced Electronic Devices for Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 1162

Special Issue Editor

Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Anseong, Republic of Korea
Interests: self-powered system; flexible electronics; bioresorbable materials; 3D structure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to provide a wide range of recent research of advanced electronic devices for biomedical applications; not only development of wearable electronic devices and implantable biomedical devices, but also an energy solution of wearable and implantable electronic devices.

Bioresorbable materials are particulary interesting for implantable electrostimulation platforms for temporal medical treatment, which can bypass a post-retrieval surgery. For example, the study of nurve/wound electrostimulation can accelerate recovery of wounded region, which are beneficial for the society. The proper closed-loop systems can realize highly advanced biomedical applications, which can facilitate telemedicine to improve the patient wellness.

Batteries are one of the most promising energy sources for wearable/implantable systems. Energy harvesting devices are also another candidate to recharge/operate the electronic wearable/implantable devices, which can extend lifetime of biomedical devices. Wireless energy transfer system may the other opportunity to develop advanced biomedical applications.

Dr. Hanjun Ryu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioresorbable materials
  • electrostimulation
  • regeneration
  • self-powered system
  • flexible electronics
  • battery
  • biomedical
  • implantable
  • wearable

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 4908 KiB  
Article
Fabrication of Yttrium Oxide Hollow Films for Efficient Passive Radiative Cooling
by Heegyeom Jeon, Sohyeon Sung, Jeehoon Yu, Hyun Kim, Yong Seok Kim and Youngjae Yoo
Materials 2023, 16(23), 7373; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16237373 - 27 Nov 2023
Viewed by 828
Abstract
In recent years, many parts of the world have researched the transition to renewable energy, reducing energy consumption and moving away from fossil fuels. Among the studies to reduce energy consumption, passive radiative cooling can reduce the energy used for building cooling, and [...] Read more.
In recent years, many parts of the world have researched the transition to renewable energy, reducing energy consumption and moving away from fossil fuels. Among the studies to reduce energy consumption, passive radiative cooling can reduce the energy used for building cooling, and to improve this, the optical properties of atmospheric window emissivity and solar reflectance must be increased. In this study, hollow yttrium oxide (H-Y2O3) was fabricated using melamine formaldehyde (MF) as a sacrificial template to improve the optical properties of passive radiative cooling. We then used finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations to predict the optical properties of the fabricated particles. This study compares the properties of MF@Y(OH)CO3 and H-Y2O3 particles derived from the same process. H-Y2O3 was found to have a solar reflectance of 70.73% and an atmospheric window emissivity of 86.24%, and the field tests revealed that the temperature of MF@Y(OH)CO3 was relatively low during the daytime. At night, the temperature of the H-Y2O3 film was found to be 2.6 °C lower than the ambient temperature of 28.8 °C. The optical properties and actual cooling capabilities of the particles at each stage of manufacturing the hollow particles were confirmed and the cooling capabilities were quantified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Electronic Devices for Biomedical Applications)
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