Special Issue "Environment-Friendly Electrochemical Processes"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Carlos Alberto Martínez-Huitle
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Chemistry, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
Interests: electrochemical technologies for water treatment; electrocatalytic materials (boron doped diamond and dimensionally stable anodes); electrocatalysis; electroanalysis and organic electrosynthesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electrochemical processes have come to be widely viewed as an emerging sustainable technology. Over the past few decades, great progress has been made in the electrochemical technologies for the treatment of effluents containing organic and inorganic pollutants. In fact, electrochemical technologies offer an alternative solution to many environmental problems in the process industry, because electrons provide a versatile, efficient, cost-effective, easily automatable, and clean reagent. The future for electrochemical processes is bright. Given the importance of these technologies, Materials, together with Professor Carlos A. Martínez-Huitle (Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil), has prepared this Special Issue to highlight the current "Environment-friendly Electrochemical Processes". Novel treatments, including technologies coupled with renewable energy sources, will be explained by experts in the field. In addition, this Special Issue provides different case studies from various industries to illustrate how these methods behave in a real-world environment. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are explained, along with advice on how to select the most suitable method which best fits the specific application needs. Their combination with conventional wastewater treatment systems is conceptually feasible, which will be also commented on by different authors. Therefore, we invite you to contribute to this Special Issue because future developments will rely upon the close collaboration of analytical chemists, engineers, and electrochemists to ensure effective the application and exploitation of these electrochemical technologies.

Prof. Dr. Carlos Alberto Martínez-Huitle
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • electrochemical technologies
  • real application
  • advantages and disadvantages

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Electro-Oxidation–Plasma Treatment for Azo Dye Carmoisine (Acid Red 14) in an Aqueous Solution
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1463; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061463 - 23 Mar 2020
Abstract
Currently, azo dye Carmoisine is an additive that is widely used in the food processing industry sector. However, limited biodegradability in the environment has become a major concern regarding the removal of azo dye. In this study, the degradation of azo dye Carmoisine [...] Read more.
Currently, azo dye Carmoisine is an additive that is widely used in the food processing industry sector. However, limited biodegradability in the environment has become a major concern regarding the removal of azo dye. In this study, the degradation of azo dye Carmoisine (acid red 14) in an aqueous solution was studied by using a sequenced process of electro-oxidation–plasma at atmospheric pressure (EO–PAP). Both the efficiency and effectiveness of the process were compared individually. To ascertain the behavior of azo dye Carmoisine over the degradation process, the variations in its physical characteristics were analyzed with a voltage–current relationship, optical emission spectra (OES) and temperature. On the other hand, chemical variables were analyzed by finding out pH, electrical conductivity, absorbance (UV/VIS Spectrophotometry), chemical oxygen demand (COD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), energy consumption and cost. The sequenced process (EO–PAP) increased degradation efficiency, reaching 100% for azo dye Carmoisine (acid red 14) in 60 min. It was observed that the introduction of small quantities of iron metal ions (Fe2+/Fe3+) as catalysts into the plasma process and the hydrogen peroxide formed in plasma electrical discharge led to the formation of larger amounts of hydroxyl radicals, thus promoting a better performance in the degradation of azo dye. This sequenced process increased the decolorization process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment-Friendly Electrochemical Processes)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Ultrasonic Parameters on Electrochemical Chloride Removal and Rebar Repassivation of Reinforced Concrete
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2774; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172774 - 29 Aug 2019
Abstract
Electrochemical chloride removal (ECR) from reinforced concrete can be considered as an environment-friendly technique since it can reduce the environmental issues arising from demolition and reconstruction. In this study, we used ultrasonic waves to promote the ECR efficiency without increasing the current density [...] Read more.
Electrochemical chloride removal (ECR) from reinforced concrete can be considered as an environment-friendly technique since it can reduce the environmental issues arising from demolition and reconstruction. In this study, we used ultrasonic waves to promote the ECR efficiency without increasing the current density so as to shorten the overall power-on time, lowering the power consumption and electricity-induced material damage. Rebar-embedded cement mortar specimens were prepared and a set of ultrasonic-assisted ECR test devices was designed. For obtaining the optimal parameters, different ultrasonic frequencies and powers were adopted to conduct the ECR test. After that, the discharged and residual chloride ion amounts were detected to characterize the ECR efficiency. The corrosion behavior of rebar was characterized by electrochemical method. It was found that ultrasonic waves can not only promote the discharge of chloride ions, but also promote the passivation process of steel bar. For this investigation, the ultrasonic waves with a frequency of 40 Hz and a power of 60 W had the best auxiliary effect and could reduce the work time by 64%. It is considered that the ultrasound-assisted method has potential to promote the application possibilities of the ECR technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment-Friendly Electrochemical Processes)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Oxidation/Disinfection of Urine Wastewaters with Different Anode Materials
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1254; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081254 - 16 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In the present work, electrochemical technology was used simultaneously for the deactivation of microorganisms and the destruction of micro-pollutants contained in synthetic urine wastewaters. Microorganisms (E. coli) were added to synthetic urine wastewaters to mimic secondary treated sewage wastewaters. Different anode [...] Read more.
In the present work, electrochemical technology was used simultaneously for the deactivation of microorganisms and the destruction of micro-pollutants contained in synthetic urine wastewaters. Microorganisms (E. coli) were added to synthetic urine wastewaters to mimic secondary treated sewage wastewaters. Different anode materials were employed including boron-doped diamond (BDD), dimensionally stable anode (DSA: IrO2 and RuO2) and platinum (Pt). The results showed that for the different anode materials, a complete deactivation of E. coli microorganisms at low applied electric charge (1.34 Ah dm−3) was obtained. The complete deactivation of microorganisms in wastewater seems to be directly related to active chlorine and oxygen species electrochemically produced at the surface of the anode material. Complete depletion of COD and TOC can be attained during electrolyses with BDD anode after the consumption of specific electric charges of 4.0 and 8.0 Ah dm−3, respectively. Higher specific electric charges (>25 Ah dm−3) were consumed to removal completely COD and about 75% of TOC during electrolyses with DSA anodes (IrO2 and RuO2). However, the electrolysis using Pt anode can partially remove and even after the consumption of high specific electric charges (>40 Ah dm−3) COD and TOC did not exceed 50 and 25%, respectively. Active chlorine species including hypochlorite ions and chloramines formed during electrolysis contribute not only to deactivate microorganisms but also to degrade organics compounds. High conversion yields of organic nitrogen into nitrates and ammonium were achieved during electrolysis BDD and DSA anodes. The results have confirmed that BDD anode is more efficient than with IrO2, RuO2 and Pt electrodes in terms of COD and TOC removals. However, higher amounts of perchlorates were measured at the end of the electrolysis using BDD anode. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment-Friendly Electrochemical Processes)
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