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Novel Diagnostic Methods for Biological Material and Biomaterial Characterization

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 November 2022) | Viewed by 11313

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, GR-700 13 Heraklion, Greece
2. XpectralTEK LDA, Travessa dos Prados, NR. 13, 4705-827 Braga, Portugal
Interests: material characterization; bio-photonics; Raman spectroscopy; FTIR spectroscopy; spectral imaging; computer vision; image processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Novel diagnostic methods, especially nondestructive, optical, spectroscopic methods, have achieved significant advancement in biological materials and biomaterial characterization.

This Special Issue will constitute an international forum for experts such as application scientists, professionals, and academics to exchange knowledge regarding the current limitations and their solutions. Furthermore, novel ideas for future diagnostic developments in biological materials will be discussed. There is a plethora of research constantly occurring related to biological materials and biomaterials. Their characterization is extremely important since it provides the indexes that answer the research questions. Established analytic methods such as gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography methods but also optical spectroscopic techniques such as Raman, NMR, and even FT-infrared (FT-IR) are receiving a lot of attention for the characterization of biological materials and biomaterials. The extensive research and development of the aforementioned methods, with innovative hardware, electronics, software, optics, and signal amplification methods (the use of nanoparticles) are significant contributions to novel diagnostic methods for biomaterial characterization.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Vassilis M. Papadakis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological materials
  • biomaterials
  • Raman
  • FT-IR
  • spectroscopy
  • diagnostics
  • gas chromatography
  • liquid chromatography

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 2168 KiB  
Article
Subtyping on Live Lymphoma Cell Lines by Raman Spectroscopy
by Klytaimnistra Katsara, Konstantina Psatha, George Kenanakis, Michalis Aivaliotis and Vassilis M. Papadakis
Materials 2022, 15(2), 546; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15020546 - 12 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2021
Abstract
Raman spectroscopy is a well-defined spectroscopic technique sensitive to the molecular vibrations of materials, since it provides fingerprint-like information regarding the molecular structure of the analyzed samples. It has been extensively used for non-destructive and label-free cell characterization, particularly in the qualitative and [...] Read more.
Raman spectroscopy is a well-defined spectroscopic technique sensitive to the molecular vibrations of materials, since it provides fingerprint-like information regarding the molecular structure of the analyzed samples. It has been extensively used for non-destructive and label-free cell characterization, particularly in the qualitative and quantitative estimation of amino acids, lipids, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates. Lymphoma cell classification is a crucial task for accurate and prompt lymphoma diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Currently, it is mostly based on limited information and requires costly and time-consuming approaches. In this work, we are proposing a fast characterization and differentiation methodology of lymphoma cell subtypes based on Raman spectroscopy. The study was performed in the temperature range of 15–37 °C to identify the best cell measurement conditions. The proposed methodology is fast, accurate, and requires minimal sample preparation, resulting in a potentially promising, non-invasive strategy for early and accurate cell lymphoma characterization. Full article
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12 pages, 3716 KiB  
Article
Polyethylene Migration from Food Packaging on Cheese Detected by Raman and Infrared (ATR/FT-IR) Spectroscopy
by Klytaimnistra Katsara, George Kenanakis, Zacharias Viskadourakis and Vassilis M. Papadakis
Materials 2021, 14(14), 3872; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14143872 - 12 Jul 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3707
Abstract
For multiple years, food packaging migration has been a major concern in food and health sciences. Plastics, such as polyethylene, are continuously utilized in food packaging for preservation and easy handling purposes during transportation and storage. In this work, three types of cheese, [...] Read more.
For multiple years, food packaging migration has been a major concern in food and health sciences. Plastics, such as polyethylene, are continuously utilized in food packaging for preservation and easy handling purposes during transportation and storage. In this work, three types of cheese, Edam, Kefalotyri and Parmesan, of different hardness were studied under two complementary vibrational spectroscopy methods, ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, to determine the migration of low-density polyethylene from plastic packaging to the surface of cheese samples. The experimental duration of this study was set to 28 days due to the degradation time of the selected cheese samples, which is clearly visible after 1 month in refrigerated conditions at 4 °C. Raman and ATR-FTIR measurements were performed at a 4–3–4–3 day pattern to obtain comparative results. Initially, consistency/repeatability measurement tests were performed on Day0 for each sample of all cheese specimens to understand if there is any overlap between the characteristic Raman and ATR-FTIR peaks of the cheese with the ones from the low-density polyethylene package. We provide evidence that on Day14, peaks of low-density polyethylene appeared due to polymeric migration in all three cheese types we tested. In all cheese samples, microbial outgrowth started to develop after Day21, as observed visually and under the bright-field microscope, causing peak reverse. Food packaging migration was validated using two different approaches of vibrational spectroscopy (Raman and FT-IR), revealing that cheese needs to be consumed within a short time frame in refrigerated conditions at 4 °C. Full article
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11 pages, 5706 KiB  
Article
Do Microplastics Enter Our Food Chain Via Root Vegetables? A Raman Based Spectroscopic Study on Raphanus sativus
by Leda-Eleni Tympa, Klytaimnistra Katsara, Panagiotis N. Moschou, George Kenanakis and Vassilis M. Papadakis
Materials 2021, 14(9), 2329; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092329 - 30 Apr 2021
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 4660
Abstract
The outburst of plastic pollution in terrestrial ecosystems poses a potential threat to agriculture and food safety. Studies have already provided evidence for the uptake of plastic microparticles by several plant species, accompanied by numerous developmental effects, using fluorescence labelling techniques. Here, we [...] Read more.
The outburst of plastic pollution in terrestrial ecosystems poses a potential threat to agriculture and food safety. Studies have already provided evidence for the uptake of plastic microparticles by several plant species, accompanied by numerous developmental effects, using fluorescence labelling techniques. Here, we introduce the implementation of confocal Raman spectroscopy, a label-free method, for the effective detection of microplastics (MPs) accumulation in the roots of a common edible root vegetable plant, Raphanus sativus, after treatment with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) powder. We also demonstrate the concomitant occurrence of phenotypic defects in the polymer-treated plants. We anticipate that this work can provide new insights not only into the extent of the impact this widespread phenomenon has on crop plants but also on the methodological requirements to address it. Full article
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