Special Issue "Recent Advances in Corrosion Science"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion and Materials Degradation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Jacek Ryl
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrochemistry, Corrosion and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland
Interests: applied electrochemistry; corrosion science; electrochemical sensors; surface engineering; surface chemistry; nonstationary processes; heterogeneous charge transfer; nanomaterials; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The dynamic development of the global industry and growing demand for new material technologies generates constantly increasing problems regarding premature material degradation and the requirement to determine corrosion mechanisms and to develop new protection/evaluation approaches. Corrosion resistance depends on numerous determinants, depending on material structure and chemistry, but also on complex environmental factors. It is highly challenging to obtain consensus between high resistance and economic factors. On the other hand, inadequate levels of corrosion control create serious hazards to life and the environment.

The Special Issue “Recent Advances in Corrosion Science” is aimed at presenting a collection of original research and reviews focused on current engineering problems and discussing the available solutions on the topic of corrosion failure mechanisms, advances in corrosion protection and evaluation techniques ranging from industrial to nanoscale applications.

Dr. Jacek Ryl
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrochemistry of corroding interfaces
  • Local corrosion processes at the micro- and nanoscale
  • Electrochemical protection of metals
  • Industrial-scale processes and corrosion monitoring
  • Advances in corrosion measurement techniques
  • Corrosion-resistant coatings and their characterization

Published Papers (11 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Alloyed Ga on the Microstructure and Corrosion Properties of As-Cast Mg–5Sn Alloys
Materials 2019, 12(22), 3686; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12223686 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
In this paper, the microstructures and corrosion behaviors of as-cast Mg–5Sn–xGa alloys with varying Ga content (x = 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 wt %) were investigated. The results indicated that Ga could not only adequately refine the grain structure [...] Read more.
In this paper, the microstructures and corrosion behaviors of as-cast Mg–5Sn–xGa alloys with varying Ga content (x = 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 wt %) were investigated. The results indicated that Ga could not only adequately refine the grain structure of the alloys, but could also improve the corrosion resistance. The microstructures of all alloys exhibited typical dendritic morphology. No Ga-rich secondary phases were detected when 0.5 wt % Ga was added, while only the morphology of Mg2Sn phase was changed. However, when the addition rate of Ga exceeded 0.5 wt %, an Mg5Ga2 intermetallic compound started to form from the interdendritic region. The volume fraction of Mg5Ga2 monotonically increased with the increasing Ga addition level. Although Mg5Ga2 phase was cathode phase, its pitting sensitivity was weaker than Mg2Sn. In addition, the standard potential of Ga (−0.55 V) was lower than that of Sn (−0.14 V), which relieved the driving force of the secondary phases for the micro-galvanic corrosion. An optimized composition of 3 wt % Ga was concluded based on the immersion tests and polarization measurements, which recorded the best corrosion resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Corrosion Inhibition Mechanism and Efficiency Differentiation of Dihydroxybenzene Isomers Towards Aluminum Alloy 5754 in Alkaline Media
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3067; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193067 - 20 Sep 2019
Abstract
The selection of efficient corrosion inhibitors requires detailed knowledge regarding the interaction mechanism, which depends on the type and amount of functional groups within the inhibitor molecule. The position of functional groups between different isomers is often overlooked, but is no less important, [...] Read more.
The selection of efficient corrosion inhibitors requires detailed knowledge regarding the interaction mechanism, which depends on the type and amount of functional groups within the inhibitor molecule. The position of functional groups between different isomers is often overlooked, but is no less important, since factors like steric hinderance may significantly affect the adsorption mechanism. In this study, we have presented how different dihydroxybenzene isomers interact with aluminum alloy 5754 surface, reducing its corrosion rate in bicarbonate buffer (pH = 11). We show that the highest inhibition efficiency among tested compounds belongs to catechol at 10 mM concentration, although the differences were moderate. Utilization of novel impedance approach to adsorption isotherm determination made it possible to confirm that while resorcinol chemisorbs on aluminum surface, catechol and quinol follows the ligand exchange model of adsorption. Unlike catechol and quinol, the protection mechanism of resorcinol is bound to interaction with insoluble aluminum corrosion products layer and was only found efficient at concentration of 100 mM (98.7%). The aforementioned studies were confirmed with Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy analyses. There is a significant increase in the corrosion resistance offered by catechol at 10 mM after 24 h exposure in electrolyte: from 63 to 98%, with only negligible changes in inhibitor efficiency observed for resorcinol at the same time. However, in the case of resorcinol a change in electrolyte color was observed. We have revealed that the differentiating factor is the keto-enol tautomerism. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of resorcinol indicate the keto form in structure in presence of NaOH, while the chemical structure of catechol does not change significantly in alkaline environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Pre-Corrosion Pits on Residual Fatigue Life for 42CrMo Steel
Materials 2019, 12(13), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12132130 - 02 Jul 2019
Abstract
The effect of pre-corrosion pits on residual fatigue life for the 42CrMo steel (American grade: AISI 4140) is investigated using the accelerated pre-corrosion specimen in the saline environment. Different pre-corroded times are used for the specimens, and fatigue tests with different loads are [...] Read more.
The effect of pre-corrosion pits on residual fatigue life for the 42CrMo steel (American grade: AISI 4140) is investigated using the accelerated pre-corrosion specimen in the saline environment. Different pre-corroded times are used for the specimens, and fatigue tests with different loads are then carried out on specimens. The pre-corrosion fatigue life is studied, and the fatigue fracture surfaces are examined by a surface profiler and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the crack nucleation sites and to determine the size and geometry of corrosion pits. Moreover, the stress intensity factor varying with corrosion pits in different size parameters is analyzed based on finite element (FE) software ABAQUS to derive the regression formula of the stress intensity factor. Subsequently, by integrating the regression formula with the Paris formula, the residual fatigue life is predicted and compared with experimental results, and the relationship of the stress intensity factor, pit depth, and residual fatigue life are given under different corrosion degrees. The fatigue life predicted by the coupled formula agrees well with experiment results. It is observed from the SEM images that higher stress amplitude and longer pre-corroded time can significantly decrease the residual fatigue life of the steel. Additionally, the research work has brought about the discovery that the rate of crack extension accelerates when the crack length increases. The research in this paper also demonstrates that the corrosion pit size can be used as a damage index to assess the residual fatigue life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Non-Isothermal Oxidation Behaviors and Mechanisms of Ti-Al Intermetallic Compounds
Materials 2019, 12(13), 2114; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12132114 - 30 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Non-isothermal oxidation is one of the important issues for the safe application of Ti-Al alloys, so this study aimed to illustrate the non-isothermal oxidation behaviors and the corresponding mechanisms of a TiAl-based alloy in comparison with a Ti3Al-based alloy. The non-isothermal [...] Read more.
Non-isothermal oxidation is one of the important issues for the safe application of Ti-Al alloys, so this study aimed to illustrate the non-isothermal oxidation behaviors and the corresponding mechanisms of a TiAl-based alloy in comparison with a Ti3Al-based alloy. The non-isothermal oxidation behaviors of Ti-46Al-2Cr-5Nb and Ti-24Al-15Nb-1.5Mo alloys in pure oxygen were comparatively investigated with a thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC) simultaneous thermal analyzer heating from room temperature to 1450 °C with a heating rate of 40 °C/min. When the temperature rose above 1280 °C, the oxidation rate of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-5Nb alloy sharply increased and exceeded that of the Ti-24Al-15Nb-1.5Mo alloy owing to the occurrence of internal oxidation. When the temperature was higher than 1350 °C, the oxidation rate of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-5Nb alloy decreased obviously due to the generation of an oxygen-barrier β-Al2TiO5-rich layer by a chemical reaction between Al2O3 and TiO2 in the oxide scale. Based on Wagner’s theory of internal oxidation, the reason for the occurrence of internal oxidation in the Ti-46Al-2Cr-5Nb alloy is the formation of the α phase in the subsurface, while no internal oxidation occurred in the Ti-24Al-15Nb-1.5Mo alloy due to the existence of the β phase in the subsurface with the enrichment of Nb and Mo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Relationship between Phase Occurrence, Chemical Composition, and Corrosion Behavior of as-Solidified Al–Pd–Co Alloys
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1661; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101661 - 22 May 2019
Abstract
The microstructure, phase constitution, and corrosion performance of as-solidified Al70Pd25Co5 and Al74Pd12Co14 alloys (element concentrations in at.%) have been investigated in the present work. The alloys were prepared by arc-melting of Al, Pd, [...] Read more.
The microstructure, phase constitution, and corrosion performance of as-solidified Al70Pd25Co5 and Al74Pd12Co14 alloys (element concentrations in at.%) have been investigated in the present work. The alloys were prepared by arc-melting of Al, Pd, and Co lumps in argon. The Al74Pd12Co14 alloy was composed of structurally complex εn phase, while the Al70Pd25Co5 alloy was composed of εn and δ phases. The corrosion performance was studied by open circuit potential measurements and potentiodynamic polarization in aqueous NaCl solution (3.5 wt.%). Marked open circuit potential oscillations of the Al70Pd25Co5 alloy have been observed, indicating individual breakdown and re-passivation events on the sample surface. A preferential corrosion attack of εn was found, while the binary δ phase (Al3Pd2) remained free of corrosion. A de-alloying of Al from εn and formation of intermittent interpenetrating channel networks occurred in both alloys. The corrosion behavior of εn is discussed in terms of its chemical composition and crystal structure. The corrosion activity of εn could be further exploited in preparation of porous Pd–Co networks with possible catalytic activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Hot Deformation Process Parameters on Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of 35CrMoV Steel
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1455; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091455 - 06 May 2019
Abstract
Hot deformation experiments of as-cast 35CrMoV steel, with strain rates of 0.01 s−1 and 10 s−1, deformation temperatures of 850, 950, and 1050 °C, and an extreme deformation reaching 50%, were carried out using a Gleeble-3810 thermal simulator. Electrochemical corrosion [...] Read more.
Hot deformation experiments of as-cast 35CrMoV steel, with strain rates of 0.01 s−1 and 10 s−1, deformation temperatures of 850, 950, and 1050 °C, and an extreme deformation reaching 50%, were carried out using a Gleeble-3810 thermal simulator. Electrochemical corrosion experiments were conducted on the deformed specimens. The microstructure was observed by optical microscope (OM), and the corrosion morphology and corrosion products of the specimens were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results show that the grain size increased gradually with an increase in the deformation temperature at the same strain rate, whereas the corrosion resistance deteriorated. At the same deformation temperature, the grain size becomes smaller as the strain rate increases, which enhances the corrosion resistance. This is mainly attributed to the fine grains, which can form more grain boundaries, increase the grain boundary area, and accelerate the formation of the inner rust layer at the beginning of corrosion. Moreover, fine grains can also refine the rust particles and enhance the bonding strength between the inner rust layer and the matrix. The denseness and stability of the inner rust layer increases as the corrosion process progresses, thereby improving corrosion resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Microstructure Characterization and Corrosion Resistance of Zinc Coating Obtained on High-Strength Grade 10.9 Bolts Using a New Thermal Diffusion Process
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1400; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091400 - 29 Apr 2019
Abstract
The article presents the results of research on the application of innovative thermal diffusion zinc coating technology with the recirculation of the reactive atmosphere to high-strength grade 10.9 bolts. The innovation of this method consists in the introduction of reactive atmosphere recirculation and [...] Read more.
The article presents the results of research on the application of innovative thermal diffusion zinc coating technology with the recirculation of the reactive atmosphere to high-strength grade 10.9 bolts. The innovation of this method consists in the introduction of reactive atmosphere recirculation and the application of coating powder mix which contains zinc powder and activator. Recirculation of the reactive atmosphere ensures its uniform composition, while the presence of an activator intensifies the process of saturating steel surface with zinc, which boosts the efficiency of active agents. Coatings were created at 440 °C and a heat soaking time of 30–240 min. Coating structure (SEM) was exposed, chemical composition in microsites (EDS) was defined, and coating phase structure (XRD) was identified. The kinetics of coating growth were defined. It was found that the increment of coating thickness was controlled by square root of soaking time. Coatings obtained using innovative thermal diffusion zinc coating technology had a two-layer structure. At the substrate, a compact layer of phase Γ1 (Fe11Zn40) was created, which was covered with a layer of phase δ1 (FeZn10). The new method of thermal diffusion zinc coating will alow for the creation of coatings of very good corrosion resistance while maintaining strength properties of bolts defined as strength class 10.9. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Experimental and Theoretical Studies on the Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel by Two Indazole Derivatives in HCl Medium
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1339; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081339 - 24 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this work, two indazole derivatives, namely 5-aminoindazole (AIA) and 5-nitroindazole (NIA), were investigated as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution by experimental and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The electrochemical results indicate that the inhibition ability follows the [...] Read more.
In this work, two indazole derivatives, namely 5-aminoindazole (AIA) and 5-nitroindazole (NIA), were investigated as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution by experimental and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The electrochemical results indicate that the inhibition ability follows the order of AIA > NIA, which is due to the stronger electron-donating effect of –NH2 of the AIA group than the –NO2 group of NIA. Besides, the frontier orbital theory shows that the AIA exhibits higher reaction activity than NIA, and a more negative adsorption energy for AIA was also obtained, which is consistent with the analysis of the electrochemical measurements. We draw the conclusion that the electron-donating effect makes it easier for AIA to donate electrons to iron atoms to form a stronger protective layer than NIA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Microstructure on the Passive Layer Chemistry and Corrosion Resistance for Some Titanium-Based Alloys
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1233; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081233 - 15 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The effect of microstructure and chemistry on the kinetics of passive layer growth and passivity breakdown of some Ti-based alloys, namely Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb and TC21 alloys, was studied. The rate of pitting corrosion was evaluated using cyclic polarization measurements. Chronoamperometry was applied to [...] Read more.
The effect of microstructure and chemistry on the kinetics of passive layer growth and passivity breakdown of some Ti-based alloys, namely Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb and TC21 alloys, was studied. The rate of pitting corrosion was evaluated using cyclic polarization measurements. Chronoamperometry was applied to assess the passive layer growth kinetics and breakdown. Microstructure influence on the uniform corrosion rate of these alloys was also investigated employing dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (DEIS). Corrosion studies were performed in 0.9% NaCl solution at 37 °C, and the obtained results were compared with ultrapure Ti (99.99%). The different phases of the microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition and chemistry of the corroded surfaces were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. For all studied alloys, the microstructure consisted of α matrix, which was strengthened by β phase. The highest and the lowest values of the β phase’s volume fraction were recorded for TC21 and Ti-Al-Nb alloys, respectively. The susceptibility of the investigated alloys toward pitting corrosion was enhanced following the sequence: Ti-6Al-7Nb < Ti-6Al-4V << TC21. Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy recorded the lowest pitting corrosion resistance (Rpit) among studied alloys, approaching that of pure Ti. The obvious changes in the microstructure of these alloys, together with XPS findings, were adopted to interpret the pronounced variation in the corrosion behavior of these materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Corrosion Characteristics of Copper-Added Austempered Gray Cast Iron (AGCI)
Materials 2019, 12(3), 503; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12030503 - 06 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The aim of this investigation was to assess the corrosion behavior of gray cast iron (GCI) alloyed with copper. Alloyed GCI specimens were austempered isothermally at varying temperatures. After austenitizing at 927 °C, the samples were austempered at different temperatures ranging from 260 [...] Read more.
The aim of this investigation was to assess the corrosion behavior of gray cast iron (GCI) alloyed with copper. Alloyed GCI specimens were austempered isothermally at varying temperatures. After austenitizing at 927 °C, the samples were austempered at different temperatures ranging from 260 to 385 °C with an interval of 25 °C for 60 minutes. As a result, these samples developed an ausferrite matrix with different percentages of austenite. The resulting microstructures were evaluated and characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion characteristics were determined using potentiodynamic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of these samples. These tests were carried out in a medium of 0.5 M H2SO4 and 3.5% NaCl solution. It was observed from the potentiodynamic polarization results that with increasing austempering temperature, the corrosion rate decreased. All results of the EIS were in accordance with a constant phase element (CPE) model. It was found that with an increase in austempering temperature, the polarization resistance (Rp) increased. The austenite content was also found to influence the corrosion behavior of the austempered gray cast iron (AGCI). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Mannich Base as Corrosion Inhibitors for N80 Steel in a CO2 Saturated Solution Containing 3 wt % NaCl
Materials 2019, 12(3), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12030449 - 01 Feb 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
In this paper, a corrosion inhibitor containing nitrogen atoms and a conjugated π bond was synthesised, and its final product synthesised by the optimal conditions of the orthogonal test results is named multi-mannich base (MBT). The corrosion inhibition effect on the N80 steel [...] Read more.
In this paper, a corrosion inhibitor containing nitrogen atoms and a conjugated π bond was synthesised, and its final product synthesised by the optimal conditions of the orthogonal test results is named multi-mannich base (MBT). The corrosion inhibition effect on the N80 steel sheet of the corrosion inhibitor was evaluated in a CO2 saturated solution containing 3 wt % NaCl; the corrosion rate was 0.0446 mm/a and the corrosion inhibition rate was 90.4%. Through electrochemical and adsorption theory study, MBT is a mixed corrosion inhibitor that mainly shows cathode suppression capacity. The adsorption of MBT on the surface of the steel sheet follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm; it can be spontaneously adsorbed on the surface of the N80 steel sheet, which has a good corrosion inhibition effect. The surface of the N80 steel sheet was microscopically characterised by atomic force microscope (AFM). It can be seen from the results that the N80 steel sheet with MBT added is significantly different from the blank control group; the surface of the steel sheet is relatively smooth, indicating that MBT forms an effective protective film on the surface of N80 steel, which inhibits the steel sheet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Corrosion Science)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop