Special Issue "Characterization and Processing of Complex Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Structure Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Akira Otsuki
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Géologie, GeoRessources UMR 7359 CNRS, University of Lorraine, 2 Rue du Doyen Marcel Roubault, BP 10162, 54505, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France
Interests: non-destructive characterization; selective material recovery; colloid and interface; sustainability and circular economy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to provide forum for scientists and engineers to share and discuss their pioneering/original findings or insightful reviews on the Characterization and Processing of Complex Materials. Reports on achievement of coupling the complexity of industrial materials/wastes/natural ores with non-destructive characterization method(s) and the unique advancement of their processing are particularly encouraged. On the other hand, any kind of contribution under the broad framework of the understanding and production of complex materials is also highly welcome.

Some potential contributions are listed below under “keywords”. One of them is the waste management and recycling of complex materials (e.g. foods, electronic wastes) via the development of a new characterization method and/or process intensification. For example, a proper characterization of complex/heterogeneous materials is still an extremely challenging task, since the majority of characterization methods analyze either the average characteristics of the whole material or a narrow area of specific interest [1,2]. On the other hand, the efficient processing/recycling of complex materials/wastes should be strongly supported by their characterization from the viewpoint of economic and environmental concerns [1].

[1] Otsuki, A.; Chen, Y.; Zhao, Y. Characterisation and beneficiation of complex ores for sustainable use of mineral resources: Refractory gold ore beneficiation as an example. Int. J. Soc. Mat. Eng. Res. 2014, 20, 126–135.

[2] Otsuki, A.; Bryant, G. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing. Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 2015, 226, 37–43.

Dr. Akira Otsuki
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Non-destructive characterization
  • Analytical chemistry and instrumentation
  • Waste management and recycling
  • Selective material recovery/processing
  • Sustainability and circular economy

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Green Process for Industrial Waste Transformation into Super-Oxidizing Materials Named Alkali Metal Ferrates (VI)
Materials 2019, 12(12), 1977; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12121977 - 19 Jun 2019
Abstract
The investigation presented here features the design of a cleaner and greener chemical process for the conversion of industrial wastes into super-oxidizing materials. The waste of interest is the iron sulfate heptahydrate (FeSO4·7H2O) mainly generated through the sulfate route [...] Read more.
The investigation presented here features the design of a cleaner and greener chemical process for the conversion of industrial wastes into super-oxidizing materials. The waste of interest is the iron sulfate heptahydrate (FeSO4·7H2O) mainly generated through the sulfate route used for titanium dioxide industrial production. The products of this transformation process are alkali ferrates (A2FeO4, A = Na, K) containing iron in its hexavalent state and considered as powerful oxidants characterized by properties useful for cleaning waters, wastewaters, and industrial effluents. The proposed process includes two steps: (i) The first step consisting of the pre-mixing of two solids (AOH with FeSO4·xH2O) in a rotary reactor allowing the coating of iron sulfate in the alkali hydroxides through solid–solid reactions; and (ii) the second step involves the synthesis of alkali ferrates in a fluidized bed by oxidation of the single solid obtained in the first step in diluted chlorine. The chemical synthesis of alkali ferrates can be carried out within a timeframe of a few minutes. The usage of a fluidized bed enhanced the energy and mass transfer allowing a quasi-complete control of the ferrate synthesis process. The alkali ferrate synthesis process described here possesses many characteristics aligned with the principles of the “green chemistry”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization and Processing of Complex Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Thermochemical Route for Extraction and Recycling of Critical, Strategic and High Value Elements from By-Products and End-of-Life Materials, Part I: Treatment of a Copper By-Product in Air Atmosphere
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1625; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101625 - 17 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Development of our modern society requests a number of critical and strategic elements (platinum group metals, In, Ga, Ge…) and high value added elements (Au, Ag, Se, Te, Ni…) which are often concentrated in by-products during the extraction of base metals (Cu, Pb, [...] Read more.
Development of our modern society requests a number of critical and strategic elements (platinum group metals, In, Ga, Ge…) and high value added elements (Au, Ag, Se, Te, Ni…) which are often concentrated in by-products during the extraction of base metals (Cu, Pb, Zn…). Further, recycling of end-of-life materials employed in high technology, renewable energy and transport by conventional extractive processes also leads to the concentration of such chemical elements and their compounds in metallurgical by-products and/or co-products. One of these materials, copper anode slime (CAS), derived from a copper electrolytic refining factory, was used for this study. The sample was subjected to isothermal treatment from 225 to 770 °C under air atmosphere and the reaction products were systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy through energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the thermal behavior of the treated sample. The main components of the anode slime (CuAgSe, Cu2-xSeyS1-y, Ag3AuSe2) react with oxygen, producing mostly copper and selenium oxides as well as Ag-Au alloys as final products at temperatures higher than 500 °C. Selenium dioxide (SeO2) is volatilized and recovered in pure state by cooling the gaseous phase, whilst copper(II) oxide, silver, gold and tellurium remain in the treatment residue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization and Processing of Complex Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop