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Antimicrobial Textile

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2022) | Viewed by 17531

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski”, 1407 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: dendrimers; polymers; dye chemistry; fluorescence; photophysics; textile; bioactivity; antibacterial materials and coatings; smart materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Head of Department of Textile, Leather and Fuels, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 1756 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: textile chemistry; dyes; dendrimers; dyeing; composite textile materials; antibacterial textiles; microbial activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Textile materials provide perfect conditions for the growth of pathogenic microorganisms causing various diseases, occurrence of obnoxious odor, decoloration, and fiber destruction. Therefore, many efforts are being put into the design and production of antimicrobial materials to be used in the manufacture of sportswear, clothing, lingerie, shoes, furniture, upholstery, wound dressings, hospital textiles, bed linen, towels, filters, etc.

Though investigations on the antimicrobial properties of textile materials have a long history, the scientific field is still relevant today because of the increasing concern regarding the resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics used in medical practice. The search for new, more effective compounds with improved antimicrobial properties is ongoing and researchers are focusing on investigating different compounds in order to invent new materials of much better antimicrobial activity and effectiveness.

There are several types of such chemicals: low and high molecular weight compounds (linear, branched, star-shaped); quaternary ammonium salts; silver ions; metal complexes; nanoparticles, etc.

The aim of the Special Issue of the journal Materials is to summarize the progress and advances in the development of new antimicrobial textile materials and their applications. 

We would like to invite you to submit contributions presenting your recent research articles, reviews, and brief communications revealing new trends in the research on antimicrobial textile materials.

Prof. Dr. Ivo Grabchev
Dr. Desislava Staneva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Textile materials
  • Textile fabrics
  • Textile composite
  • Antibacterial textile
  • Hydrogels
  • Nanoparticles
  • Metal complexes
  • Quaternary compounds
  • Medical textile
  • Wound dressing
  • Antibacterial
  • Antifungal
  • Microbiological

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 3171 KiB  
Article
Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles from Camellia sinensis and Its Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Effect against Clinical Isolates
by Syed Ghazanfar Ali, Mohammad Jalal, Hilal Ahmad, Diwakar Sharma, Akil Ahmad, Khalid Umar and Haris Manzoor Khan
Materials 2022, 15(19), 6978; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15196978 - 8 Oct 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2400
Abstract
The green synthesis method of was used for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Camellia sinensis (green tea). The Camellia sinensis silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) were characterized using different techniques, including UV-Vis (ultra violet-visible), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), and XRD [...] Read more.
The green synthesis method of was used for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Camellia sinensis (green tea). The Camellia sinensis silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) were characterized using different techniques, including UV-Vis (ultra violet-visible), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), and XRD (X-ray diffraction). The average size of the CS-AgNPs was 52 nm, according to TEM. The CS-AgNPs showed excellent antibacterial and antifungal activity. The MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) against bacterial isolates varied from 31.25 to 62.5 µg/mL, whereas for fungal isolates, the MIC varied from 125 to 250 µg/mL. The presence of a zone in the well diffusion assay showed the antimicrobial nature of CS-AgNPs. Further, CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscopy) showed that CS-AgNPs possess antibiofilm activity. The interaction of CS-AgNPs with the Candidal cells was analyzed using TEM, and it was revealed that CS-AgNPs entered the cell and disrupted the cell machinery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Textile)
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16 pages, 5749 KiB  
Article
Anti-Mold Protection of Textile Surfaces with Cold Plasma Produced Biocidal Nanocoatings
by Ewa Tyczkowska-Sieroń, Agnieszka Kiryszewska-Jesionek, Ryszard Kapica and Jacek Tyczkowski
Materials 2022, 15(19), 6834; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15196834 - 1 Oct 2022
Viewed by 2913
Abstract
The permanent anti-mold protection of textile surfaces, particularly those utilized in the manufacture of outdoor sporting goods, is still an issue that requires cutting-edge solutions. This study attempts to obtain antifungal nanocoatings on four selected fabrics used in the production of high-mountain clothing [...] Read more.
The permanent anti-mold protection of textile surfaces, particularly those utilized in the manufacture of outdoor sporting goods, is still an issue that requires cutting-edge solutions. This study attempts to obtain antifungal nanocoatings on four selected fabrics used in the production of high-mountain clothing and sleeping bags, and on PET foil as a model substrate, employing the cold plasma technique for this purpose. Three plasma treatment procedures were used to obtain such nanocoatings: plasma-activated graft copolymerization of a biocidal precursor, deposition of a thin-film matrix by plasma-activated graft copolymerization and anchoring biocidal molecules therein, and plasma polymerization of a biocidal precursor. The precursors used represented three important groups of antifungal agents: phenols, amines, and anchored compounds. SEM microscopy and FTIR-ATR spectrometry were used to characterize the produced nanocoatings. For testing antifungal properties, four species of common mold fungi were selected: A. niger, A. fumigatus, A. tenuissima, and P. chrysogenum. It was found that the relatively best nanocoating, both in terms of plasma process performance, durability, and anti-mold activity, is plasma polymerized 2-allylphenol. The obtained results confirm our belief that cold plasma technology is a great tool for modifying the surface of textiles to provide them with antifungal properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Textile)
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11 pages, 3188 KiB  
Article
Hyperbranched Polymers Modified with Dansyl Units and Their Cu(II) Complexes. Bioactivity Studies
by Paula Bosch, Desislava Staneva, Evgenia Vasileva-Tonkova, Petar Grozdanov, Ivanka Nikolova, Rositsa Kukeva, Radostina Stoyanova and Ivo Grabchev
Materials 2020, 13(20), 4574; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204574 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1546
Abstract
Two new copper complexes of hyperbranched polymers modified with dansyl units were synthesized and characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. It was found that copper ions coordinate predominantly with nitrogen or oxygen atoms of the polymer molecule. The [...] Read more.
Two new copper complexes of hyperbranched polymers modified with dansyl units were synthesized and characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. It was found that copper ions coordinate predominantly with nitrogen or oxygen atoms of the polymer molecule. The place of the formation of complexes and the number of copper ions involved depend on the chemical structure of the polymer. The antimicrobial activity of the new polymers and their Cu(II) complexes was tested against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial and fungal strains. Copper complexes were found to have activity better than that of the corresponding ligands. The deposition of the modified branched polymers onto cotton fabrics prevents the formation of bacterial biofilms, which indicates that the studied polymers can find application in antibacterial textiles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Textile)
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11 pages, 2664 KiB  
Article
A New Bioactive Complex between Zn(II) and a Fluorescent Symmetrical Benzanthrone Tripod for an Antibacterial Textile
by Desislava Staneva, Evgenia Vasileva-Tonkova and Ivo Grabchev
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3473; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213473 - 23 Oct 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2099
Abstract
A new fluorescent Zn(II) complex of symmetrical tripod form based on a 3-substituted benzanthrone (BT) has been synthesized and characterised. The basic photophysical properties of the new metal complex have been determined. It has been found by fluorescence spectroscopy that, one zinc ion [...] Read more.
A new fluorescent Zn(II) complex of symmetrical tripod form based on a 3-substituted benzanthrone (BT) has been synthesized and characterised. The basic photophysical properties of the new metal complex have been determined. It has been found by fluorescence spectroscopy that, one zinc ion forms a complex with the tripod ligand. The surface morphology of the ligand and its Zn(II) complex has been investigated by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used for the characterisation of the chemical composition of the complex surfaces. The antibacterial activity of the Zn(II) complex has been investigated in solution and upon its deposition onto a cotton fabric. A reduction of biofilm formation on the surface of the cotton fabric has been observed compared to the non-treated cotton material. The results obtained demonstrate that the studied Zn(II) complex possesses good antimicrobial activity being most effective against the used Gram-positive bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Textile)
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12 pages, 2518 KiB  
Article
Antibacterial Activity and Biodegradation of Cellulose Fiber Blends with Incorporated ZnO
by Domen Malis, Barbka Jeršek, Brigita Tomšič, Danaja Štular, Barbara Golja, Gregor Kapun and Barbara Simončič
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3399; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203399 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 3249
Abstract
This research aimed to study the influence of lyocell with incorporated ZnO (CLY) for antibacterial activity and biodegradation of fiber blends composed of viscose (CV), flax (LI), and CLY. Fiber blended samples with an increased weight fraction of CLY fibers were composed, and [...] Read more.
This research aimed to study the influence of lyocell with incorporated ZnO (CLY) for antibacterial activity and biodegradation of fiber blends composed of viscose (CV), flax (LI), and CLY. Fiber blended samples with an increased weight fraction of CLY fibers were composed, and single CLY, CV and LI fibers were also used for comparison. Antibacterial activity was determined for the Gram-negative Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The biodegradation of fiber blends was investigated by the soil burial test. The results show that the single CLY fibers exhibited high antimicrobial activity against both E. coli and S. aureus bacteria and that the presence of LI fibers in the blended samples did not significantly affect antibacterial activity against E. coli, but drastically decreased the antibacterial activity against S. aureus. LI fibers strongly promoted the growth of S. aureus and, consequently, impaired the antimicrobial performance of ZnO against this bacterium. The presence of CLY fibers slowed down, but did not prevent, the biodegradation process of the fiber blends, even at the highest ZnO concentration. The soil that was in contact with the fiber blended samples during their burial was not contaminated to such an extent as to affect the growth of sprouts, confirming the sustainability of the fiber blends. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Textile)
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Review

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18 pages, 3183 KiB  
Review
Textile Materials Modified with Stimuli-Responsive Drug Carrier for Skin Topical and Transdermal Delivery
by Daniela Atanasova, Desislava Staneva and Ivo Grabchev
Materials 2021, 14(4), 930; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14040930 - 16 Feb 2021
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 4246
Abstract
Textile materials, as a suitable matrix for different active substances facilitating their gradual release, can have an important role in skin topical or transdermal therapy. Characterized by compositional and structural variety, those materials readily meet the requirements for applications in specific therapies. Aromatherapy, [...] Read more.
Textile materials, as a suitable matrix for different active substances facilitating their gradual release, can have an important role in skin topical or transdermal therapy. Characterized by compositional and structural variety, those materials readily meet the requirements for applications in specific therapies. Aromatherapy, antimicrobial substances and painkillers, hormone therapy, psoriasis treatment, atopic dermatitis, melanoma, etc., are some of the areas where textiles can be used as carriers. There are versatile optional methods for loading the biologically active substances onto textile materials. The oldest ones are by exhaustion, spraying, and a pad-dry-cure method. Another widespread method is the microencapsulation. The modification of textile materials with stimuli-responsive polymers is a perspective route to obtaining new textiles of improved multifunctional properties and intelligent response. In recent years, research has focused on new structures such as dendrimers, polymer micelles, liposomes, polymer nanoparticles, and hydrogels. Numerous functional groups and the ability to encapsulate different substances define dendrimer molecules as promising carriers for drug delivery. Hydrogels are also high molecular hydrophilic structures that can be used to modify textile material. They absorb a large amount of water or biological fluids and can support the delivery of medicines. These characteristics correspond to one of the current trends in the development of materials used in transdermal therapy, namely production of intelligent materials, i.e., such that allow controlled concentration and time delivery of the active substance and simultaneous visualization of the process, which can only be achieved with appropriate and purposeful modification of the textile material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Textile)
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