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Advances in Bacterial Nanocellulose-Based Materials

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2023) | Viewed by 9456

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CICECO—Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: production and application of biogenic nanofibers (bacterial cellulose and protein fibrils); nanostructured biocomposites; bio-based materials for biomedical applications (wound healing, drug delivery and 3D-bioprinting); biocomposites and functional paper materials; chemical modification of (nano)cellulose fibers and other polysaccharides and their characterization and applications; chemistry of lignocellulosic materials (cellulose, wood, cork, etc.)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
CICECO–Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: sustainable use of biopolymers (nanocellulose, chitosan, pullulan, proteins, etc.) for the design of functional nanostructured materials for biomedical (e.g., drug delivery and wound healing) and technological (e.g., active packaging, fuel cells, and water remediation) applications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial nanocellulose is a remarkable hydrocolloidal bacterial exopolysaccharide with singular properties that run the gamut from in situ moldability and shape retention, to high purity and water-holding capacity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and unique mechanical properties. Furthermore, the application horizons of this nanoscale form of cellulose (and materials thereof) have been expanded to multiple fields, from those in the food industry (e.g., packaging) to specific technological (e.g., sensors and fuel cells) and biomedical (e.g., wound healing, tissue engineering, and 3D bioprinting) applications.

This Special Issue of Materials will gather the recent advances of top scientists in the field of bacterial nanocellulose-based materials with a focus on their production, properties, and applications. Therefore, bacterial nanocellulose-based materials assembled with distinct macromolecules and molecules, such as natural and synthetic polymers, bioactive compounds, and inorganic nanoparticles, are more than welcome for this Special Issue on “Advances in Bacterial Nanocellulose-based Materials”.

Prof. Dr. Armando J. D. Silvestre
Prof. Dr. Carmen S. R. Freire
Dr. Carla Vilela
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bacterial nanocellulose
  • nanocomposites
  • hybrid materials
  • hydrogels
  • aerogels
  • membranes
  • biomedical applications
  • technological applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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21 pages, 4051 KiB  
Article
Bioactive Bacterial Nanocellulose Membranes Enriched with Eucalyptus globulus Labill. Leaves Aqueous Extract for Anti-Aging Skin Care Applications
by Tânia Almeida, Patrícia Moreira, Fábio J. Sousa, Cláudia Pereira, Armando J. D. Silvestre, Carla Vilela and Carmen S. R. Freire
Materials 2022, 15(5), 1982; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15051982 - 7 Mar 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3284
Abstract
Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) membranes, with remarkable physical and mechanical properties, emerged as a versatile biopolymeric carrier of bioactive compounds for skin care applications. In this study, BNC membranes were loaded with glycerol (as plasticizer and humectant agent) and different doses (1–3 μg cm [...] Read more.
Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) membranes, with remarkable physical and mechanical properties, emerged as a versatile biopolymeric carrier of bioactive compounds for skin care applications. In this study, BNC membranes were loaded with glycerol (as plasticizer and humectant agent) and different doses (1–3 μg cm−2) of an aqueous extract obtained from the hydro-distillation of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. leaves (HDE), for application as sheet facial masks. All membranes are resistant and highly malleable at dry and wet states, with similar or even better mechanical properties than those of a commercial BNC mask. Moreover, the HDE was found to confer a dose-dependent antioxidant activity to pure BNC. Additionally, upon 3 months of storage at 22–25 °C and 52% relative humidity (RH) or at 40 °C and 75% RH, it was confirmed that the antioxidant activity and the macroscopic aspect of the membrane with 2 μg cm−2 of HDE were maintained. Membranes were also shown to be non-cytotoxic towards HaCaT and NIH/3T3 cells, and the membrane with 2 μg cm−2 of HDE caused a significant reduction in the senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in NIH/3T3 cells. These findings suggest the suitability and potential of the obtained membranes as bioactive facial masks for anti-aging applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bacterial Nanocellulose-Based Materials)
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21 pages, 3239 KiB  
Article
Bionanocellulose/Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Composites Produced by In-Situ Method and Ex-Situ/Impregnation or Sterilization Methods
by Aldona Długa, Jolanta Kowalonek and Halina Kaczmarek
Materials 2021, 14(21), 6340; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14216340 - 23 Oct 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1759
Abstract
The purpose of the work was to obtain composites based on bionanocellulose (BNC) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) for specific biomedical and cosmetic applications and to determine how the method and conditions of their preparation affect their utility properties. Three different ways of manufacturing [...] Read more.
The purpose of the work was to obtain composites based on bionanocellulose (BNC) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) for specific biomedical and cosmetic applications and to determine how the method and conditions of their preparation affect their utility properties. Three different ways of manufacturing these composites (in-situ method and ex-situ methods combined with sterilization or impregnation) were presented. The structure and morphology of BNC/PVA composites were studied by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and scanning microscopy (SEM, AFM). Surface properties were tested by contact angle measurements. The degree of crystallinity of the BNC fibrils was determined by means of the XRD method. The mechanical properties of the BNC/PVA films were examined using tensile tests and via the determination of their bursting strength. The water uptake of the obtained materials was determined through the gravimetric method. The results showed that PVA added to the nutrient medium caused an increase in biosynthesis yield. Moreover, an increase in base weight was observed in composites of all types due to the presence of PVA. The ex-situ composites revealed excellent water absorption capacity. The in-situ composites appeared to be the most durable and elastic materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bacterial Nanocellulose-Based Materials)
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Review

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28 pages, 3312 KiB  
Review
Efficacy of Bacterial Nanocellulose in Hard Tissue Regeneration: A Review
by Anuj Kumar and Sung-Soo Han
Materials 2021, 14(17), 4777; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14174777 - 24 Aug 2021
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 3284
Abstract
Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC, as exopolysaccharide) synthesized by some specific bacteria strains is a fascinating biopolymer composed of the three-dimensional pure cellulosic nanofibrous matrix without containing lignin, hemicellulose, pectin, and other impurities as in plant-based cellulose. Due to its excellent biocompatibility (in vitro and [...] Read more.
Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC, as exopolysaccharide) synthesized by some specific bacteria strains is a fascinating biopolymer composed of the three-dimensional pure cellulosic nanofibrous matrix without containing lignin, hemicellulose, pectin, and other impurities as in plant-based cellulose. Due to its excellent biocompatibility (in vitro and in vivo), high water-holding capacity, flexibility, high mechanical properties, and a large number of hydroxyl groups that are most similar characteristics of native tissues, BNC has shown great potential in tissue engineering applications. This review focuses on and discusses the efficacy of BNC- or BNC-based biomaterials for hard tissue regeneration. In this review, we provide brief information on the key aspects of synthesis and properties of BNC, including solubility, biodegradability, thermal stability, antimicrobial ability, toxicity, and cellular response. Further, modification approaches are discussed briefly to improve the properties of BNC or BNC-based structures. In addition, various biomaterials by using BNC (as sacrificial template or matrix) or BNC in conjugation with polymers and/or fillers are reviewed and discussed for dental and bone tissue engineering applications. Moreover, the conclusion with perspective for future research directions of using BNC for hard tissue regeneration is briefly discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bacterial Nanocellulose-Based Materials)
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