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Recycling and Sustainability of Industrial Solid Waste

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 1851

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819, China
Interests: recycling; sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue titled Studies on Recycling and Sustainability of Industrial Solid Waste provides important insights into the environmental and economic benefits of managing waste in an environmentally responsible manner. Industrial solid waste is a by-product of various industrial processes and can include items such as coal ash, mine tailings, slag from iron and steel production, and other inorganic residues. Recycling industrial solid waste can help reduce the amount of waste sent to landfills, conserve natural resources, and cut down greenhouse gas emissions. Sustainability is also key in the management of industrial solid waste. It involves efforts to minimize waste generation, promote resource efficiency, and reduce the environmental impact of solid waste disposal. Recycling and sustainability are essential aspects of industrial solid waste management that can help us address the global waste challenge while also protecting the environment and creating economic benefits. This Special Issue covers the following topics: industrial solid waste, recycling, sustainability, resource recovery, energy recovery, environmental impacts, and CO2 emission reduction.

Dr. Zhanjun Wang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • industrial solid waste
  • recycling
  • sustainability
  • resource recovery
  • energy recovery
  • environmental impacts
  • CO2 emission reduction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1268 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Slag-Containing Steamed Concrete’s Composition Efficiency
by Leonid Dvorkin, Vadim Zhitkovsky, Ruslan Makarenko and Yuri Ribakov
Materials 2024, 17(6), 1300; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17061300 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 546
Abstract
Thermal power plant slag is a waste that is presently obtained from many power stations all over the world. A possible method for its utilization is using it to produce concrete. This paper analyses the effect of thermal power plant slag on the [...] Read more.
Thermal power plant slag is a waste that is presently obtained from many power stations all over the world. A possible method for its utilization is using it to produce concrete. This paper analyses the effect of thermal power plant slag on the technological properties of concrete mixtures and the mechanical properties of concrete subjected to heat–moisture processing. Quantitative estimates of the investigated factors’ influence on the concrete mixture’s water demand and the strength of steamed concrete were obtained. The influences of TPP slag content and its water demand on concrete composition features as well as concrete strength are shown. The novelty of the work lies in the use of an experimental–statistical model to optimize the composition of steamed concrete using slag from the viewpoint of maximum strength per kilogram of cement. It has been demonstrated that the optimal part of slag in aggregate, which provides maximum strength at 4 h and 28 days after steaming, is 0.5–0.55 and 0.45–0.55, respectively. A method for the design of concrete composition using slag from thermal power plants is proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycling and Sustainability of Industrial Solid Waste)
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19 pages, 9769 KiB  
Article
Corrosion Behavior of 10 ppi TAD3D/5A05Al Composite in a Chloride Environment
by Zishen Li, Shengpu Wang, Yuxin Chen, Gaofeng Fu and Lan Jiang
Materials 2024, 17(6), 1280; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17061280 - 10 Mar 2024
Viewed by 619
Abstract
This study utilizes desalted and denitrated treated aluminum dross (TAD) as a raw material, along with kaolin and 10 ppi (pores per inch) polyurethane foam as a template. The slurry is converted into an aluminum dross green body with a three-dimensional network structure [...] Read more.
This study utilizes desalted and denitrated treated aluminum dross (TAD) as a raw material, along with kaolin and 10 ppi (pores per inch) polyurethane foam as a template. The slurry is converted into an aluminum dross green body with a three-dimensional network structure using the impregnation method. A three-dimensional network aluminum dross ceramic framework (TAD3D) is created at a sintering temperature of 1350 °C. The liquid 5A05 aluminum alloy at a temperature of 950 °C infiltrates into the voids of TAD3D through pressureless infiltration, resulting in TAD3D/5A05Al composite material with an interpenetrating phase composite (IPC) structure. The corrosion behavior of TAD3D/5A05 composite material in sodium chloride solution was examined using the salt spray test (NSS) method. The study shows that the pores of the TAD3D framework, produced by sintering aluminum dross as raw material, are approximately 10 ppi. The bonding between TAD3D and 5A05Al interfaces is dense, with strong interfacial adhesion. The NSS corrosion time ranged from 24 h to 360 h, during which the composite material underwent pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion and self-healing processes. Results from Potentiodynamic Polarization (PDP) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) indicate that, as corrosion progresses, the Ecorr of TAD3D/5A05Al decreases from −0.718 V to −0.786 V, and Icorr decreases from 0.398 μA·cm−2 to 0.141 μA·cm−2. A dense oxide film forms on the surface of the composite material, increasing the anodic Tafel slope and decreasing the cathodic Tafel slope, thus slowing down the rates of cathodic and anodic reactions. Factors such as lower interface corrosion resistance or a relatively weak passivation film at the interface do not significantly diminish the corrosion resistance of TAD3D and 5A05Al. The corrosion resistance of the composite material initially decreases and then increases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycling and Sustainability of Industrial Solid Waste)
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17 pages, 4427 KiB  
Article
Development of Solid Waste-Based Composite Calcium Ferrite Flux and Its Application in Hot Metal Pre-Dephosphorization
by Zheng Zhao, Xiaoming Feng, Yanling Zhang, Yao Zhang and Yaoting Wu
Materials 2024, 17(5), 992; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17050992 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 407
Abstract
To enhance the slagging efficiency of the lime-based slag system during the pre-treatment stage of hot metal, a composite calcium ferrite flux based on aluminum industry solid waste was developed in this study. The melting characteristics of the flux and its application in [...] Read more.
To enhance the slagging efficiency of the lime-based slag system during the pre-treatment stage of hot metal, a composite calcium ferrite flux based on aluminum industry solid waste was developed in this study. The melting characteristics of the flux and its application in the pre-treatment of hot metal were investigated. The results indicated that the main phases of the composite calcium ferrite were CaFe2O4, Ca2Fe2O5, and Ca2(Fe,Al)2O4. It exhibited high oxidation, high alkalinity, and a low melting point, thereby achieving excellent melting performance. Simulations of various dephosphorization fluxes in the pre-treatment of high-phosphorus hot metal, ordinary hot metal, and kilogram-scale dephosphorization experiment processes were conducted. Under the same experimental conditions, the composite calcium ferrite flux was able to achieve a dephosphorization rate of over 90% and a final phosphorus content of less than 0.02 wt% under high carbon content ([%C] = 3.2 wt%). In the application of hot metal pre-dephosphorization, this flux was able to achieve efficient melting and rapid slagging of lime at a lower temperature, and its slagging time was 50% faster than that of calcium ferrite flux. In addition, this flux enhanced the utilization efficiency of lime during the steelmaking process, effectively prevented the agglomeration of slag, and achieved efficient slag–metal separation. These characteristics were significantly better than the application effect of calcium ferrite flux. This flux has significant implications for the industrial application of deep dephosphorization in the pre-treatment stage of hot metal or the early stage of converter steelmaking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycling and Sustainability of Industrial Solid Waste)
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