Magnetochemistry: From Fundamentals to Applications

A special issue of Magnetochemistry (ISSN 2312-7481).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2015) | Viewed by 30209

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjasot, Valencia, Spain
Interests: molecular magnetism; coordination magnetic polymers; magnetic MOFs; magnetic polyoxometalates; conducting magnetic materials; multifunctional magnetic materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This first issue of Magnetochemistry is intended to cover what we expect to be all aspects of magnetochemistry's future. Of course, I agree with Niels Bohr that “Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future.” However, the rapid advance in our knowledge of magnetochemistry in the last few decades, along with recent discoveries in this fascinating area, give us some hints as to how magnetochemistry will evolve. Therefore, in this issue, we will cover many different subjects, including theoretical models and calculations in magnetism, the crystal engineering of magnetic materials, molecular magnetism, single-molecule magnets (SMM), single-ion magnets (SIM), single-chain magnets (SCM), spin-crossover (SCO) materials, magnetic porous coordination polymers or metal-organic frameworks (magnetic-MOFs), magnetic memories, the quantum manipulation of spins, magnetic multifunctional devices, magnetocaloric materials, magnetic nanostructures, etc.

In this Special Issue, we aim to cover recent progress and novel trends in any of the aforementioned topics listed above. The Special Issue will provide a forum to present, discuss, and review the latest advances in these topics (note that either general or more focussed reviews on any aspect of this discipline are also welcome for this first Special Issue).

Prof. Dr. Carlos J. Gómez-García
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Magnetochemistry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • magnetochemistry
  • magnetic materials
  • magnetic models
  • SIM
  • SMM
  • SCM
  • spin-crossover materials
  • magnetic-MOFs
  • magnetic polymers
  • magnetic nanostructures
  • magnetic memories
  • quantum magnetism

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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141 KiB  
Editorial
Magnetochemistry: From Fundamentals to Applications
by Carlos J. Gómez-García
Magnetochemistry 2016, 2(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry2010004 - 25 Jan 2016
Viewed by 3536
Abstract
It is well knowm that Magnetochemistry is a multidisplinary area that deals with many different materials and properties. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetochemistry: From Fundamentals to Applications)

Research

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1253 KiB  
Article
Key Role of Size and Electronic Configuration on the Sign and Strength of the Magnetic Coupling in a Series of Cu2Ln Trimers (Ln = Ce, Gd, Tb, Dy and Er)
by Soumavo Ghosh, Carlos J. Gómez García, Juan M. Clemente-Juan and Ashutosh Ghosh
Magnetochemistry 2016, 2(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry2010002 - 29 Dec 2015
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 5410
Abstract
Five new trinuclear complexes with formula [(CuLα−Me)2Ce(NO3)3] (1) and [(CuLα−Me)2Ln(H2O)(NO3)2](NO3)·2(CH3OH) (Ln = Gd(2), Tb(3), Dy( [...] Read more.
Five new trinuclear complexes with formula [(CuLα−Me)2Ce(NO3)3] (1) and [(CuLα−Me)2Ln(H2O)(NO3)2](NO3)·2(CH3OH) (Ln = Gd(2), Tb(3), Dy(4) and Er(5)) have been synthesized using the bidentate N2O2 donor metalloligand [CuLα−Me] (H2Lα−Me = N,N′-bis(α-methylsalicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine) and structurally characterized. In the case of compound 1, the larger ionic radius of Ce(III) leads to a neutral trinuclear complex with an asymmetric CeO10 tetradecahedron coordination geometry formed by four oxygen atoms from two (CuLα−Me) units and three bidentate NO3 ligands. In contrast, the isomorphic complexes 25, with smaller Ln(III) ions, give rise to monocationic trinuclear complexes with a non-coordinated nitrate as a counter ion. In these complexes, the Ln(III) ions show a LnO9 tricapped trigonal prismatic coordination geometry with C2 symmetry formed by four oxygen atoms from two (CuLα−Me) units, two bidentate NO3 ligands and a water molecule. The magnetic properties show the presence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions in 1 and weak ferromagnetic interactions in 25. The fit of the magnetic properties of compounds 25 to a simple isotropic-exchange symmetric trimer model, including the anisotropy of the Ln(III) ions, shows that in all cases the Cu-Ln magnetic coupling is weak (JCu-Ln = 1.81, 1.27, 0.88 and 0.31 cm−1 for 25, respectively) and linearly decreases as the number of unpaired f electrons of the Ln(III) decreases. The value found in compound 2 nicely fits with the previously established correlation between the dihedral Cu–O–O–Gd angle and the J value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetochemistry: From Fundamentals to Applications)
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3211 KiB  
Article
A Spin Crossover Transition in a Mn(II) Chain Compound
by Samia Benmansour, Smail Triki and Carlos J. Gómez-García
Magnetochemistry 2016, 2(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry2010001 - 29 Dec 2015
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 5780
Abstract
Three new compounds have been synthesized and characterized with Fe(II), Co(II) and Mn(II), the polynitrile anionic ligand 1,1,3,3-tetracyano-2-(3-hydroxypropoxy)-propenide (tcnopr3OH) and the co-ligand 4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bpy). The Fe(II) compound, formulated as [FeII(tcnoprOH)2(H2O)2(4,4′-bpy)2] ( [...] Read more.
Three new compounds have been synthesized and characterized with Fe(II), Co(II) and Mn(II), the polynitrile anionic ligand 1,1,3,3-tetracyano-2-(3-hydroxypropoxy)-propenide (tcnopr3OH) and the co-ligand 4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bpy). The Fe(II) compound, formulated as [FeII(tcnoprOH)2(H2O)2(4,4′-bpy)2] (1), contains monomeric complexes where the Fe(II) ion is coordinated to two trans polynitrile ligands, two trans 4,4′-bpy ligands and two trans water molecules. Compounds [MII(H2O)4(µ-4,4′-bpy)][MII(tcnoprOH)4(µ-4,4′-bpy)].3H2O, M = Mn (2) and Co (3), are isostructural and crystallize in segregated cationic and anionic chains that can be formulated as [MII(H2O)4(µ-4,4′-bpy)]n2n+ and [MII(tcnoprOH)4(µ-4,4′-bpy)]n2n, respectively with M = Mn (2) and Co (3). The magnetic properties of Compound 1 show the expected paramagnetic behavior for an isolated high spin S = 2 Fe(II) ion with a zero field splitting of |D| = 4.0(1) cm−1. Compound 3 presents the expected behavior for isolated Co(II) centers, whereas Compound 2 shows an unexpected partial smooth spin crossover (SCO) transition in the anionic [MnII(tcnoprOH)4(µ-4,4′-bpy)]n2n chain together with a paramagnetic contribution of the cationic [MnII(H2O)4(µ-4,4′-bpy)]n2n+ chain. This behavior has been confirmed with DSC measurements. This is one of the very few examples of SCO transition observed in a Mn(II) complex and the first one in a Mn(II) chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetochemistry: From Fundamentals to Applications)
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6402 KiB  
Article
Magnetic Behaviour of Transition Metal Complexes with Functionalized Chiral and C60-Filled Nanotubes as Bridging Ligands: A Theoretical Study
by Silvia Gómez-Coca and Eliseo Ruiz
Magnetochemistry 2015, 1(1), 62-71; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry1010062 - 4 Dec 2015
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3466
Abstract
Functionalized nanotubes are promising candidates to promote communication between paramagnetic centres at large distances through their highly delocalized π systems. Here, Density Functional Theory methods are employed to study the exchange coupling interaction between FeIII paramagnetic centres coordinated at terminal carboxylate ligands [...] Read more.
Functionalized nanotubes are promising candidates to promote communication between paramagnetic centres at large distances through their highly delocalized π systems. Here, Density Functional Theory methods are employed to study the exchange coupling interaction between FeIII paramagnetic centres coordinated at terminal carboxylate ligands of functionalized nanotubes. Chiral nanotubes exhibit ferromagnetic coupling at long distances while non-chiral systems usually favor antiferromagnetic coupling. The inclusion of C60 molecules inside the nanotube, resulting in peapod structures, in some cases causes dramatic changes in the coupling interactions and spin density. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetochemistry: From Fundamentals to Applications)
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1483 KiB  
Article
Novel Topologies in Vanadium-bis-β-Diketone Chemistry: A [V4] and a [V6] Metallacyclophane
by Ivana Borilovic, Olivier Roubeau, Irene Fernández Vidal, Simon J. Teat and Guillem Aromí
Magnetochemistry 2015, 1(1), 45-61; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry1010045 - 2 Dec 2015
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 5012
Abstract
Exploring the chemistry of vanadyl ions (VO2+) with bis-β-diketone ligands, in pyridine reactions of vanadyl sulfate with 1,3-bis-(3-oxo-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-propionyl)-benzene (H4L1) and 1,3-bis-(3-oxo-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-propionyl)-pyridine (H4L2), two novel clusters, [(VIVO)4(H2L1) [...] Read more.
Exploring the chemistry of vanadyl ions (VO2+) with bis-β-diketone ligands, in pyridine reactions of vanadyl sulfate with 1,3-bis-(3-oxo-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-propionyl)-benzene (H4L1) and 1,3-bis-(3-oxo-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-propionyl)-pyridine (H4L2), two novel clusters, [(VIVO)4(H2L1)4(py)4] (1) and [(VVO)4(VIVO)2 (O)4(L2)2(py)6] (2) were prepared and characterized. Due to the conformational flexibility of the ligands, both entities exhibit very peculiar metal topologies and composition, differing significantly from structural patterns established in the related chemistry of divalent 3d metals. Structural analysis also unveils the existence of the most complex metallamacrocycles from this family to date. Studies of the magnetic properties via bulk magnetization measurements and EPR spectroscopy confirmed the existence of uncoupled long-distant S = 1/2 metal centers and the spin ground states S = 2 and S = 1 of the clusters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetochemistry: From Fundamentals to Applications)
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1739 KiB  
Article
Magnetic Properties and the Superatom Character of 13-Atom Platinum Nanoclusters
by Emil Roduner and Christopher Jensen
Magnetochemistry 2015, 1(1), 28-44; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry1010028 - 26 Nov 2015
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 5928
Abstract
13-atom platinum nanoclusters have been synthesized quantitatively in the pores of the zeolites NaY and KL. They reveal highly interesting magnetic properties like high-spin states, a blocking temperature, and super-diamagnetism, depending heavily on the loading of chemisorbed hydrogen. Additionally, EPR active states are [...] Read more.
13-atom platinum nanoclusters have been synthesized quantitatively in the pores of the zeolites NaY and KL. They reveal highly interesting magnetic properties like high-spin states, a blocking temperature, and super-diamagnetism, depending heavily on the loading of chemisorbed hydrogen. Additionally, EPR active states are observed. All of these magnetic properties are understood best if one considers the near-spherical clusters as analogs of transition metal atoms with low-spin and high-spin states, and with delocalized molecular orbitals which have a structure similar to that of atomic orbitals. These clusters are, therefore, called superatoms, and it is their analogy with normal atoms which is in the focus of the present work, but further phenomena, like the observation of a magnetic blocking temperature and the possibility of superconductivity, are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetochemistry: From Fundamentals to Applications)
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