Strength Training for Human Health and Performance

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Exercise for Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 November 2021) | Viewed by 8900

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport, Health and Social Sciences, Solent University, E Park Terrace, Southampton SO14 0YN, UK
Interests: strength training; muscle hypertrophy; efficient resistance exercise (minimal dose); low-back pain and lumbar muscle strengthening; perceptual responses to resistance exercise; fatigue
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Guest Editor
School of Sport, Health and Social Sciences, Solent University, Southampton, UK
Interests: strength training; muscle hypertrophy; efficient resistance exercise (minimal dose); minimum effective dose training for 1RM strength in powerlifting; strength sports performance

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Guest Editor
School of Sport, Health and Social Sciences, Solent University, Southampton, UK
Interests: strength training; muscle hypertrophy; efficient resistance exercise (minimal dose); range of motion (ROM) in resistance training

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Strength training, whilst a staple of physical conditioning for sports and athletic performance, is continuing to gain importance as a recommendation for the lay person to improve health and longevity. Strength training provides numerous health related physiological benefits including reduced risk of cancer, increased metabolic rate, reduction in low back pain, increased bone mineral density, reduced blood pressure, and improved muscle quality and insulin sensitivity in persons with type-2 diabetes. Furthermore, the typical performance and aesthetic goals of increasing strength and muscle mass, are indeed predictors of longevity and reduction in all-cause mortality.

With growing evidence to support the use of strength training to improve cardiovascular fitness, and our ever-increasing understanding of the muscle as an endocrine organ through the release of myokines, we invite researchers to submit their articles across the broad spectrum of strength training for human health and performance.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to present new research in strength training prescription and to provide new insights regarding established strength training models. We invite investigators to contribute with case studies, original research articles and review articles that would represent and stimulate continuing efforts to answer questions on the acute and chronic effects of strength training for human health and performance; whether this be in symptomatic and clinical populations, adolescents and untrained younger- or older-adults, or athletic populations.

We look forward to receiving your contribution.

Dr. James Fisher
Dr. Patroklos Androulakis-Korakakis
Dr. Milo Wolf
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Strength training
  • Resistance training
  • Muscle strengthening exercise
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Muscle strength
  • Muscle hypertrophy
  • Sarcopenia

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 251 KiB  
Article
Association between Concentric and Eccentric Isokinetic Torque and Unilateral Countermovement Jump Variables in Professional Soccer Players
by Bruno Mazziotti Oliveira Alves, Robson Dias Scoz, Ricardo Lima Burigo, Isabella Christina Ferreira, Ana Paula Silveira Ramos, Jose Joao Baltazar Mendes, Luciano Maia Alves Ferreira and Cesar Ferreira Amorim
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2022, 7(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk7010025 - 25 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2418
Abstract
Isokinetic tests have been highly valuable to athletic analysis, but their cost and technical operation turn them inaccessible. The purpose of this study was to verify the correlation between unilateral countermovement jump variables and isokinetic data. Thirty-two male professional soccer players were subjected [...] Read more.
Isokinetic tests have been highly valuable to athletic analysis, but their cost and technical operation turn them inaccessible. The purpose of this study was to verify the correlation between unilateral countermovement jump variables and isokinetic data. Thirty-two male professional soccer players were subjected to the isokinetic testing of both knee extensors and flexors in concentric and eccentric muscle contractions. They also executed unilateral countermovement vertical jumps (UCMJ) to compare maximum height, ground reaction force, and impulse power with isokinetic peak torque. Data analysis was conducted through Pearson correlation and linear regression. A high correlation was found between dominant unilateral extensor concentric peak torque and the UCMJ maximum height of the dominant leg. The non-dominant leg jump showed a moderate correlation. No other variable showed statistical significance. Linear regression allowed the generation of two formulae to estimate the peak torque from UCMJ for dominant and non-dominant legs. Although few studies were found to compare our results, leading to more studies being needed, a better understanding of the unilateral countermovement jump may be used in the future as a substitute to the expensive and technically demanding isokinetic testing when it is unavailable, allowing the assessment of lower limb physical asymmetries in athletic or rehabilitation environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strength Training for Human Health and Performance)
11 pages, 470 KiB  
Article
Training Load, Maturity Timing and Future National Team Selection in National Youth Basketball Players
by Jorge Arede, Tomás T. Freitas, David Johnson, John F. T. Fernandes, Sean Williams, Jason Moran and Nuno Leite
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2022, 7(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk7010021 - 11 Feb 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3018
Abstract
Despite its importance to the management of training stress, monotony and recovery from exercise, training load has not been quantified during periods of intensity training in youths. This study aimed to (1) examine and quantify the training load (TL) in youth national team [...] Read more.
Despite its importance to the management of training stress, monotony and recovery from exercise, training load has not been quantified during periods of intensity training in youths. This study aimed to (1) examine and quantify the training load (TL) in youth national team basketball players during a 2-week training camp according to maturity timing and (2) determine which parameters were related to under-18 (U18) national team selection. Twenty-nine U-16 national team basketball players underwent an anthropometric assessment to determine maturity timing. Players were categorised by maturity timing (early vs. average), whilst TL parameters during a 2-week training camp (i.e., 21 sessions) prior to FIBA U16 European Championship were used for group comparison and to predict future U-18 national team selection. The early-maturing players, who were taller and heavier (p < 0.05), experienced greater training strain in week 1 (p < 0.05) only. Irrespective of maturity timing, training loads in week 2 were predictive of onward selection for the U-18 national team. Conclusion: Based on present findings, practitioners are encouraged to develop their athletes’ ability to tolerate high weekly loads, but also to be mindful that athletes’ perceived exertion during national team training may be influenced by maturity timing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strength Training for Human Health and Performance)
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7 pages, 1236 KiB  
Article
Spondyloarthritis and Strength Training: A 4-Year Report
by Roberto Cannataro, Lorenzo Di Maio, Andrea Malorgio, Matteo Levi Micheli and Erika Cione
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2021, 6(3), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk6030058 - 24 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2621
Abstract
Peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) has predominant peripheral (arthritis, enthesitis, or dactylitis) involvement. The severity of the symptoms can have a significant impact on the quality of life. There is no therapeutic gold standard, and physical exercise, with the opposition of resistance, remains controversial. Herein, [...] Read more.
Peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) has predominant peripheral (arthritis, enthesitis, or dactylitis) involvement. The severity of the symptoms can have a significant impact on the quality of life. There is no therapeutic gold standard, and physical exercise, with the opposition of resistance, remains controversial. Herein, we report the case of a woman who, at the age of 50, comes to our center with evident motor difficulties. She was previously diagnosed with SpA and was in therapy with a biological drug (adalimumab) for over one year. The training program and the nutritional intervention plan improved her condition, as pointed out by WOMAC, SQS, RAD-36 questionnaire, and BIA analysis, suspending biological therapy for almost two years. During this period, she achieved in sequence: (i) the Italian master deadlift championship, and (ii) the Italian master powerlifting championship, both for two consecutive years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strength Training for Human Health and Performance)
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