Special Issue "Polymer Composites and Fibers"

A special issue of Journal of Composites Science (ISSN 2504-477X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Xiangfa Wu
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108, USA
Interests: polymer matrix composites (PMCs); mulitifunctinal nanofibers; electrospinning; energy conversion and storage; surface and interface engineering; mechanical properties; solid mechanics
Dr. Oksana Zholobko

Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108, USA
Interests: smart polymeric systems; high-temperature polymers; multifunctional nanofibers and membranes; electrospinning; material characterization; energy conversion and storage; hydrogel chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymer matrix composites (PMCs), composed of synthetic or natural polymeric resins reinforced with high performance fibers and particles, have found broad applications in aerospace and aeronautical structures, ground vehicles, offshore and civil infrastructures, sports utilities, amongst others. due to their unique high specific strength and stiffness, sound anticorrosion capability, and low-cost manufacturing. This Special Issue will focus on the general topics on the materials, processing, characterization, and modeling of PMCs, fibers, and fibrous materials. The topics to be covered include but are not limited to:

  • Processing and characterization of PMCs
  • Fabrication and characterization of micro- and nanofibers of polymers, carbon, or other materials
  • PMCs and fibers from biodegradable and/or renewable materials
  • New concepts of structural and multifunctional PMCs and fibers
  • PMCs and fibrous materials for emerging applications in biomedical engineering, environmental protection, renewable energy harvesting, conversion, storage, etc.
  • Interface toughening, damage self-healing, and surface treatment techniques for PMCs and fibers
  • Theoretical, analytical, and computational modeling of the mechanical and multifunctional performances of PMCs, fibers, and fibrous materials

Dr. Xiangfa Wu
Dr. Oksana Zholobko
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Composites Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymer matrix composites (PMCs)
  • Self-healing composites
  • Biodegradable composites
  • Natural fiber-reinforced composites
  • Multifunctional composites
  • Fibrous materials
  • Micro/nanofibers
  • Interface toughening
  • Surface treatment of fibers
  • Mechanical properties
  • Composite processing
  • Modelling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mechanical Properties of a Unidirectional Basalt-Fiber/Epoxy Composite
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(3), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4030101 - 29 Jul 2020
Abstract
High-performance composites based on basalt fibers are becoming increasingly available. However, in comparison to traditional composites containing glass or carbon fibers, their mechanical properties are currently less well known. In particular, this is the case for laminates consisting of unidirectional plies of continuous [...] Read more.
High-performance composites based on basalt fibers are becoming increasingly available. However, in comparison to traditional composites containing glass or carbon fibers, their mechanical properties are currently less well known. In particular, this is the case for laminates consisting of unidirectional plies of continuous basalt fibers in an epoxy polymer matrix. Here, we report a full quasi-static characterization of the properties of such a material. To this end, we investigate tension, compression, and shear specimens, cut from quality autoclave-cured basalt composites. Our findings indicate that, in terms of strength and stiffness, unidirectional basalt fiber composites are comparable to, or better than epoxy composites made from E-glass fibers. At the same time, basalt fiber composites combine low manufacturing costs with good recycling properties and are therefore well suited to a number of engineering applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Composites and Fibers)
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Open AccessArticle
Miniaturised Rod-Shaped Polymer Structures with Wire or Fibre Reinforcement—Manufacturing and Testing
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(3), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4030084 - 27 Jun 2020
Abstract
Rod-shaped polymer-based composite structures are applied to a wide range of applications in the process engineering, automotive, aviation, aerospace and marine industries. Therefore, the adequate knowledge of manufacturing methods is essential, covering the fabrication of small amounts of specimens as well as the [...] Read more.
Rod-shaped polymer-based composite structures are applied to a wide range of applications in the process engineering, automotive, aviation, aerospace and marine industries. Therefore, the adequate knowledge of manufacturing methods is essential, covering the fabrication of small amounts of specimens as well as the low-cost manufacturing of high quantities of solid rods using continuous manufacturing processes. To assess the different manufacturing methods and compare the resulting quality of the semi-finished products, the cross-sectional and bending properties of rod-shaped structures obtained from a thermoplastic micro-pultrusion process, conventional fibre reinforced epoxy resin-based solid rods and fibre reinforced thermoplastic polymers manufactured by means of an implemented shrink tube consolidation process, were statistically analysed. Using the statistical method one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), the differences between groups were calculated. The statistical results show that the flexural moduli of carbon fibre reinforced polymers were statistically significantly higher than the modulus of all other investigated specimens (probability value ). The discontinuous shrink tube consolidation process resulted in specimens with a smooth outer contour and a high level of roundness. However, this process was recommended for the manufacturing of small amounts of specimens. In contrast, the pultrusion process allowed the manufacturing of high amounts of semi-finished products; however, it requires a more extensive process controlling and manufacturing equipment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Composites and Fibers)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Enhanced ITZ in Engineered Polypropylene Fibers for Bond Improvement
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4020053 - 11 May 2020
Abstract
The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is well known to be a zone of high porosity and lesser strength and is the weak zone in the fiber-reinforced matrix. This study aims to evaluate the improvement in the bonding between engineered polypropylene fibers and the [...] Read more.
The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is well known to be a zone of high porosity and lesser strength and is the weak zone in the fiber-reinforced matrix. This study aims to evaluate the improvement in the bonding between engineered polypropylene fibers and the surrounding mortar matrix. The improvement was implemented by modifying the ITZ, which develops between the fibers and the cementitious matrix. Two commercially available repair materials have been used in this study, Mix M and Mix P. Mix M served as the base material for the prepared fibers, whereas Mix P is a fiber-reinforced repair mortar and provides a comparison. A total of six types of mixes have been investigated. The improved bonding is tested by coating the polypropylene fibers with supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) using an innovative patented concept. In this study, silica fume and metakaolin are used as the SCM because of their fine size and pozzolanic capacity. The study involves multiple items of investigation, including mechanical tests such as compressive strength, direct tensile strength, and three-point bending tests. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of the different mixes helped in evaluating and analyzing the ITZ between the fiber and matrix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Composites and Fibers)
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