Head and Neck Cancer—Updates in Research and Treatment 2.0

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 August 2024 | Viewed by 2014

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail
Guest Editor
Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstr. 10-14, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
Interests: head and neck cancer (HNC); head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); human papillomavirus (HPV); immuno-oncology; biomarker; prognostic factor; genetic risk factors; outcome research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer developing in the head and neck region is pre-dominantly diagnosed in an advanced stage and, despite recent advances in local and systemic treatment regimens, is linked to high rates of local failure and distant metastasis leading to rather poor outcomes. The first Special Issue in this series (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/jcm/special_issues/Head_Neck_Cancer_HPV) focused on head and neck cancers (HNCs) linked to infections with high-risk oncogenic subtypes of the human papillomavirus (HPV). Strong evidence has accumulated since 1983 about the etiological involvement of HPV in a subset of head and neck cancers (HNCs), and substantial differences between HPV-associated and HPV-negative HNCs have been observed establishing HPV as a prognostic factor, especially in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). As the neoplastic transformation of epithelial cells caused by high-risk HPV subtypes was found to be linked to the overexpression of p16, immunohistochemical p16 detection is routinely used as a surrogate for HPV-related HNC. Despite good reasons to supplement p16 with HPV genotyping, we are now in an era of separate tumor staging of OPSCC based on p16-positivity. There is increasing knowledge about some pitfalls whenever p16 is solely used, and discrimination between HPV-driven HNCs from other HNCs and the clear identification of prognostic subgroups are more desired than ever. Moreover, HPV-related HNSCC might arise not only from epithelia in near proximity or adjeacent to Waldeyer’s throat ring but also from the larynx, hypopharynx, the oral cavity, and sinonasal sinuses. However, the majority of HNCs is found to be etiologically linked to lifestyle-associated high exposure to tobacco smoke and alcohol, and even patients with HPV-driven OPSCC often report a history of many years of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Therefore, it is not easy to dissect these highly influential risk factors on the development of HNCs and relapse after therapy in curative intent. Molecular analyses to elucidate differences in gene expression patterns in HNSCC with rather good or poor outcomes might have the potential to inform future develeopments to improve diagnosis and prognostication and lead to the detection of future targets for therapy. Therefore, we invite authors working in the field to submit contributions of original research and state-of-the-art reviews related to the epidemiology of HNCs including HPV-positive HNCs, the immune response to HPV, HPV testing and genotyping, detection of pre-disposing gene polymorphisms and somatic mutations as well as predictive factors for outcomes, and quality of life in HPV-positive versus HPV-negative HNCs, as well as reports of clinical trials and other areas of research dealing with HPV in HNCs for this Special Issue.

Dr. Gunnar Wichmann
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • head and neck cancer (HNC)
  • oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC)
  • head and neck squamous cell carci-noma (HNSCC)
  • human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • HPV-driven oropharynx cancer
  • biomarker
  • prognostic factor
  • outcome research
  • larynx
  • hypopharynx
  • oral cavity

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

28 pages, 1884 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Cancer Stage, Selected Immunological Parameters, Epstein–Barr Virus Infection, and Total Serum Content of Iron, Zinc, and Copper in Patients with Laryngeal Cancer
by Julia Wojnicka, Ewelina Grywalska, Anna Hymos, Paulina Mertowska, Sebastian Mertowski, Małgorzata Charytanowicz, Maria Klatka, Janusz Klatka, Wojciech Remington Dolliver and Anna Błażewicz
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(2), 511; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13020511 - 16 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1120
Abstract
(1) Background: the purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between cancer stage, selected immunological parameters, Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection, and total serum content of iron, zinc, and copper in patients with laryngeal cancer (LC). (2) Methods: serum Fe, Zn, and [...] Read more.
(1) Background: the purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between cancer stage, selected immunological parameters, Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection, and total serum content of iron, zinc, and copper in patients with laryngeal cancer (LC). (2) Methods: serum Fe, Zn, and Cu were measured in 40 LC patients and 20 controls. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood lymphocytes was performed by flow cytometry using fluorescent antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD25, CD69, and PD-1. Tumor and lymph node lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. EBV DNA was quantified by real-time PCR, targeting the EBNA-1 gene. Associations between serum elements, immune markers, and cancer grade/stage were evaluated using ANOVA and appropriate nonparametric tests. (3) Results: levels of Fe, Cu, and Zn were lower, while Cu/Zn was statistically higher, in patients with LC than in the control group. Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant association between the levels of these elements and parameters of the TNM (Tumor, Node, Metastasis) staging system, immunophenotype, and the amount of EBV genetic material in patients with LC who survived for more than 5 years. (4) Conclusion: the results suggest that the total serum levels of the determined micronutrients may significantly affect the immunopathogenesis and progression of LC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer—Updates in Research and Treatment 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 2233 KiB  
Article
Frailty and Increased Levels of Symptom Burden Can Predict the Presence of Each Other in HNSCC Patients
by Viktor Kunz, Gunnar Wichmann, Theresa Wald, Andreas Dietz and Susanne Wiegand
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(1), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13010212 - 29 Dec 2023
Viewed by 673
Abstract
Frailty is an important risk factor for adverse events (AEs), especially in elderly patients. Therefore, assessing frailty before therapy is recommended. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, frailty is prognostic for severe postoperative complications and declining quality of life (QoL) [...] Read more.
Frailty is an important risk factor for adverse events (AEs), especially in elderly patients. Therefore, assessing frailty before therapy is recommended. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, frailty is prognostic for severe postoperative complications and declining quality of life (QoL) after HNSCC treatment. Thus, assessment of frailty may help to identify individuals at risk for AE caused by oncologic therapy. We investigated the relationship between frailty and symptom burden to better understand their interaction and impact on HNSCC patients. In this prospectively designed cross-sectional study, the presence of frailty and symptom burden was assessed by using the Geriatric 8 (G8) and Minimal Documentation System (MIDOS2) questionnaires. A total of 59 consecutively accrued patients with a first diagnosis of HNSCC before therapy were evaluated. Patients were considered frail at a total G8 score ≤ 14. The MIDOS2 symptom burden score was considered pathological with a total score ≥ 4 or any severe symptom (=3). Statistical correlations were analyzed using Spearman and Pearson correlation. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were used to analyze the potential of predicting frailty and MIDOS2. p-values < 0.05 were considered significant. A total of 41 patients (69.5%) were considered frail, and 27 patients (45.8%) had increased symptom burden. “Tiredness” was the most common (overall rate 57.8%) and “Pain” was the most often stated “severe” symptom (5 patients, 8.5%). G8 and MIDOS2 correlated significantly (ρ = −0.487, p < 0.001; r = −0.423, p < 0.001). Frailty can be predicted by MIDOS2 symptom score (AUC = 0.808, 95% CI 0.698–0.917, p < 0.001). Vice versa, the G8 score can predict pathological symptom burden according to MIDOS2 (AUC = 0.750, 95% CI 0.622–0.878, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The strong link between frailty and increased symptom burden assessed by G8 or MIDOS2 indicates a coherence of both risk factors in HNSCC patients. Considering at least one of both scores might improve the identification of individuals at risk and achieve higher QoL and reduced complication rates by decision making for appropriate therapy regimens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer—Updates in Research and Treatment 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop