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Special Issue "Positional Cranial Deformation: Etiology, Natural History, Prevention, Treatment and Sequelae"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Orthopedics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Kevin M. Kelly

Associate Research Scientist, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health; Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology; University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biological and biomedical anthropology; craniofacial morphology; bone biology; population health; mixed methods; data analysis; contemporary US

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The highly successful 1992 American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation to have healthy infants sleep supine was followed by an increase in the prevalence of nonsynostotic occipital deformations (plagiocephaly), as evidenced by a notable rise in the number of infants being referred to craniofacial and neurosurgical clinics for surgical correction. The “epidemic” spawned a debate around the diagnosis and management of the condition that has not subsided. In 1998, the discussion was further complicated by the United States Food and Drug Administration’s decision to classify cranial orthoses as Class II devices. In 2014, the discourse was inflamed by a now highly criticized clinical trial that, for the first time, failed to see improvements following orthotic treatment. Orthotic correction of positional cranial deformation has long been the standard of care. Nevertheless, the necessity for treatment as well as the management and consequences of the condition continue to be debated. A range of issues remain unresolved—many familiar to those around in the 1990s. These include questions about the etiology and natural history of the condition, the need for standardization of terms, measurement and treatment guidelines, the cost-effectiveness of various treatment modalities, as well as the functional, development, and psychosocial consequences of condition. The objective of this Special Issue to address these issues in order to provide better-informed decisions about prevention and treatment.

Dr. Kevin M. Kelly
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plagiocephaly
  • Brachycephaly
  • Cranial flattening
  • Flat head syndrome
  • Risk factors
  • Cephalometry
  • Orthotic devices
  • Treatment outcomes
  • Development
  • Motor skills

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission.
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