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Special Issue "Early Diagnosis and Early Intervention for Children with Cerebral Palsy, First Three Years of Life"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Andrea Guzzetta

Associate Professor, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, The University of Pisa;
Head of Infant Neurology and Stella Maris Infant Lab for Early-intervention (SMILE), IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris, Pisa, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: advanced brain imaging; early brain damage; early diagnosis; neuroplastic mechanisms; early intervention paradigms; parent-infant intersubjectivity and environmental enrichment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, early detection of CP (Cerebral Palsy) and related neurodevelopmental disorders is considered one of the major challenges in pediatric healthcare, holding the highest odds of producing ground-breaking changes in child healthcare in the near future. An important international effort review publication lead by Prof. Novak (JAMA, 2017) has provided the guideline on the topic and pointed out that the time of diagnosis and the beginning of intervention typically start months after the first clinical signs may be observed.

The still existing diagnostic lag presents a major burden in the amelioration of the long-term outcome. It has been demonstrated that the response to the intervention is more significant the earlier services are initiated, likely due to the greater level of brain plasticity during the first weeks of life. Parallel to the early detection efforts, the improved understanding of childhood development, neurodevelopmental disorders and neuralplasticity is leading to an increased value, availability, and utilization of early intervention services.

I invite you to participate in this Special Issue, which aims to collect the most recent evidence of assessments and interventions for young children at high risk of, or with a diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy. The manuscripts may include any format (data driven, systematic review, state-of-the-art review) that may contribute to the further understanding of the role of early detection and intervention of CP for later neurodevelopmental outcome. This includes, but is not limited to, manuscripts on neuroimaging, neurophysiology, or behavioral assessments techniques for the detection, prediction or classification of CP, its severity, comorbidities, and long term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Equally important will be the inclusion of reports or protocols about interventions that focus on the population within the first three years of life.

Dr. Andrea Guzzetta
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Early brain damage
  • Neuroimaging, neurophysiology
  • Early diagnosis
  • Early intervention
  • Environmental enrichment
  • Parent-infant intersubjectivity
  • Neuroplastic mechanisms
  • Cortical reorganization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Factors Associated with Parents’ Adherence to Different Types of Exercises in Home Programs for Children with Disabilities
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(4), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040456
Received: 24 January 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 5 April 2019
PDF Full-text (266 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is a lack of knowledge with regard to the adherence to different types of exercises prescribed for children with disabilities. The aim was to examine parents’ adherence to prescriptions of different types of home exercises; to identify associated factors related to the [...] Read more.
There is a lack of knowledge with regard to the adherence to different types of exercises prescribed for children with disabilities. The aim was to examine parents’ adherence to prescriptions of different types of home exercises; to identify associated factors related to the parents, the children and the environment, and to assess the relative influence of the behaviour of health professionals. Parents (393) were recruited from 18 early intervention centres. A cross-sectional survey using a self-reported questionnaire was used to examine whether three types of exercises (“flexibility exercises”, “neuromotor development training” and “body mechanics and postural stabilisation”) were prescribed in their home programs; if the child had received exercises according to a prescription; and items related to the parents, child, environment, and health professionals. The adherence rates were different among the types of exercises. Parents with low perception of barriers and high self-efficacy had a higher adherence to neuromotor development training and postural stabilization, whereas parents with a high level of knowledge increased their odds of adherence to flexibility exercises. Health professionals’ behaviour had a distinct influence on the adherence to different exercises. This study suggests the need to specifically consider the types of exercises prescribed in the management of adherence to home programs. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Annexin A1 as Neuroprotective Determinant for Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(2), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020137
Received: 23 November 2018 / Revised: 8 January 2019 / Accepted: 20 January 2019 / Published: 24 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3710 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induced brain injury and life-long neurological pathologies. Treatment options are limited. Recently, we found that mesenchymal stem/stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) protected the brain in ovine fetuses exposed to HI. We hypothesized that [...] Read more.
Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induced brain injury and life-long neurological pathologies. Treatment options are limited. Recently, we found that mesenchymal stem/stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) protected the brain in ovine fetuses exposed to HI. We hypothesized that Annexin A1 (ANXA1), present in MSC-EVs, contributed to their therapeutic potential by targeting the ANXA1/Formyl peptide receptor (FPR), thereby preventing loss of the BBB integrity. Cerebral ANXA1 expression and leakage of albumin into the fetal ovine brain parenchyma after HI were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. For mechanistic insights, barrier integrity of primary fetal endothelial cells was assessed after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by treatment with MSC-EVs or human recombinant ANXA1 in the presence or absence of FPR inhibitors. Our study revealed that BBB integrity was compromised after HI which was improved by MSC-EVs containing ANXA1. Treatment with these MSC-EVs or ANXA1 improved BBB integrity after OGD, an effect abolished by FPR inhibitors. Furthermore, endogenous ANXA1 was depleted within 24 h after induction of HI in cerebovasculature and ependyma and upregulated 72 h after HI in microglia. Targeting ANXA1/FPR with ANXA1 in the immature brain has great potential in preventing BBB loss and concomitant brain injury following HI. Full article
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J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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