Special Issue "Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jennifer Jones
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, UHN; University of Toronto; Canada
Interests: survivorship; cancer rehabilitation; health promotion; behaviour change; implementation research
Dr. Kristin Campbell
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Dept. of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia
Interests: Exercise, rehabilitation, oncology, survivorship, physical function

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to improvements in early detection together with the development of increasingly effective treatments, mortality rates have dropped significantly over the past three decades for many of the most prevalent cancers. This has led to a dramatic rise in the number of cancer survivors worldwide. Cancer survivors have unique needs and face multiple physical, functional, and psychosocial challenges during and after cancer treatment, which requires the development of innovative models of care and interventions.

With this Special Issue, we hope to encourage submissions that provide new information on the needs of cancer survivors, address and focus on interventions and innovative models of survivorship care and cancer rehabilitation, and address issues related to implementation of these services.

Submissions are encouraged on the following topics:

  • Descriptive studies on survivors’ experiences and outcomes (particular interest in older cancer survivors; non-breast cancer populations);
  • Descriptive studies on late and long-term physical and psychosocial effects, (particular focus on long-term survivors > 5 years and biologic mechanisms and genetic factors related to adverse effects) as well as participation restrictions, functional wellbeing, and disability;
  • Models of survivorship care (particular focus on patterns and quality of survivorship care topics as care coordination, health care utilization, and survivorship care planning);
  • Cancer rehabilitation and prehabilitation interventions that reduce disability of cancer survivors across the lifespan;
  • Evidence-based practice and implementation science in cancer rehabilitation and survivorship programs.

Dr. Jennifer Jones
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cancer survivorship
  • cancer rehabilitation
  • adverse side effects
  • models of care
  • implementation science

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exercise before, during, and after Hospitalization for Allogeneic Hematological Stem Cell Transplant: A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1854; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061854 - 14 Jun 2020
Abstract
People with cancer who undergo allogeneic hematological stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) experience significant deconditioning that can compromise quality of life. Exercise has shown to be beneficial before or after allo-HSCT; however, little is known about exercise therapy delivered across the continuum of care. [...] Read more.
People with cancer who undergo allogeneic hematological stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) experience significant deconditioning that can compromise quality of life. Exercise has shown to be beneficial before or after allo-HSCT; however, little is known about exercise therapy delivered across the continuum of care. We conducted a feasibility randomized controlled trial of exercise delivered prior to admission, during the inpatient stay, and after discharge versus control in people with planned allo-HSCT. Feasibility was assessed via recruitment and retention rates, the incidence of adverse events, and adherence to the exercise prescription. Estimates of efficacy were measured at baseline, one week prior to hospital admission, and 100 days and one year after transplant. The recruitment and retention rates were 20% and 33%, respectively. One serious adverse event occurred during the baseline six-minute walk test that precluded participation in the study and no adverse events were associated with the intervention. From baseline to pre-transplant, the intervention group improved six-minute walk test distances by 45 m (95% CI: −18.0 to 108.7)—a finding that warrants further investigation with an adequately powered trial. Our study contributes important feasibility considerations and pilot data for future exercise intervention research in allo-HSCT recipients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship)
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Open AccessArticle
Increased Acid-Producing Diet and Past Smoking Intensity Are Associated with Worse Prognoses among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Prospective Cohort Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1817; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061817 - 11 Jun 2020
Abstract
Current dietary guidelines do not consider cancer survivors’ and past smokers’ low capacity to regulate their acid–base balance. People with a low capacity to regulate their acid–base balance are more susceptible to acid-producing diets. We studied a cohort of 2950 early stage breast [...] Read more.
Current dietary guidelines do not consider cancer survivors’ and past smokers’ low capacity to regulate their acid–base balance. People with a low capacity to regulate their acid–base balance are more susceptible to acid-producing diets. We studied a cohort of 2950 early stage breast cancer survivors who provided dietary information at baseline and during follow-up. We assessed the intakes of acid-producing diets via two commonly used dietary acid load scores: potential renal acid load (PRAL) and net endogenous acid production (NEAP). We assessed past smoking intensity by pack-years of smoking. After an average of 7.3 years of follow-up, there were 295 total deaths, 249 breast cancer-specific deaths, and 490 cases of recurrent breast cancer. Increased intakes of dietary acid load and pack-years of smoking were each independently and jointly associated with increased total mortality and breast cancer-specific mortality; tests for trends and overall associations were statistically significant for NEAP and marginally significant for PRAL. Compared to women in the lowest tertile of NEAP and pack-year of smoking = 0, women in the highest tertile of NEAP and pack-years of smoking >15 had the greatest increased risk of total mortality (HR = 3.23, 95%CI 1.99–5.26). Further, dietary acid scores were associated with increased breast cancer recurrence among women with pack-years of smoking >0 but not in those with pack-years of smoking = 0 (p values for interactions <0.05). Our study provides valuable evidence for adding dietary acid load scores to dietary guidelines for breast cancer survivors and developing specific guidelines for past smokers among these survivors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship)
Open AccessArticle
Electromyographic Analysis of Shoulder Neuromuscular Activity in Women Following Breast Cancer Treatment: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1804; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061804 - 10 Jun 2020
Abstract
Certain secondary effects derived from medical treatment in breast cancer can favor the development of alterations in shoulder biomechanics. To the best of our knowledge, persistent peripheral pain as a key factor for the development of neuromuscular activity impairments has not been analyzed. [...] Read more.
Certain secondary effects derived from medical treatment in breast cancer can favor the development of alterations in shoulder biomechanics. To the best of our knowledge, persistent peripheral pain as a key factor for the development of neuromuscular activity impairments has not been analyzed. A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out. A total of 90 women were included and allocated to three groups: (i) 30 women with persistent peripheral pain after breast cancer treatment, (ii) 30 women without pain after breast cancer treatment, and (iii) 30 healthy women. Surface electromyography was employed to measure the onset and amplitude of the muscle activity of three shoulder movements. Statistically significant differences were found in the neuromuscular activity for all the muscles and shoulder movements among women with persistent pain versus healthy women (i.e., amplitude muscle activity variable p < 0.001). Statistically significant differences were also observed in the neuromuscular activity for certain muscles in shoulder movements among women with persistent pain versus women without pain, as well as between women without pain versus healthy women. Therefore, following breast cancer treatment, women showed alterations in their shoulder neuromuscular activity, which were more significant if persistent pain existed. These findings may contribute to developing a selective therapeutic exercise program that optimizes the shoulder neuromuscular activity in women after breast cancer treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship)
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Open AccessArticle
The Needs and Experiences of Post-Treatment Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(5), 1444; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051444 - 13 May 2020
Abstract
(1) Background: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) who have been diagnosed with and treated for cancer have unique healthcare needs, but more research is needed to inform developmentally targeted cancer care for this population. The purpose of the current analyses was to describe [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) who have been diagnosed with and treated for cancer have unique healthcare needs, but more research is needed to inform developmentally targeted cancer care for this population. The purpose of the current analyses was to describe the physical and psychosocial concerns and experiences of AYA cancer survivors during the post-treatment phase. (2) Methods: A national survey was conducted by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer to evaluate the experiences and unmet needs of cancer survivors (≥18 years) within the first 5 years following cancer treatment. The current analyses were conducted on the AYA survivor population (18–34 years). (3) Results: A total of 575 surveys were completed by AYAs. Of these, 61% were female, 51% were married/partnered, and 52% were 1–3 years post treatment. Approximately three-quarters report their physical or emotional health as good/very good. Overall, 88% reported at least one physical concern [mean of 3.98+2.11 physical concerns (range 0–9)], 90% reported at least one emotional concern [mean of 3.77+1.75 emotional concern (range 0–6)], and 79% reported at least one practical challenge [mean of 2.39+1.28 practical concerns (range 0–5)]. The most common concerns were anxiety/worry about cancer returning (83%), fatigue/tiredness (78%), and depression/loss of interest in daily activities (66%). On average, 43% of those reporting a concern sought help. Common reasons for not seeking help included not wanting to ask, being told that it was normal to feel the way they did, or embarrassment. Of those who did seek help, 37% encountered difficulty obtaining assistance. (4) Conclusions: These results suggest that post-treatment AYA cancer survivors have a high rate and number of physical, psychosocial, and practical concerns and are often not seeking or receiving help to address these. Proactive approaches to characterizing and eliminating barriers to obtaining appropriate care are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship)
Open AccessArticle
Feasibility, Safety and Effects of a One-Week, Ski-Based Exercise Intervention in Brain Tumor Patients and Their Relatives: A Pilot Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 1006; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9041006 - 02 Apr 2020
Abstract
A brain tumor diagnosis poses a significant psychological burden and it severely impacts quality of life (QOL), both in patients and relatives. However, comprehensive strategies addressing QOL in this setting remain rare. Here, we aim to share our findings of a one-week ski [...] Read more.
A brain tumor diagnosis poses a significant psychological burden and it severely impacts quality of life (QOL), both in patients and relatives. However, comprehensive strategies addressing QOL in this setting remain rare. Here, we aim to share our findings of a one-week ski exercise intervention, with emphasis on feasibility, safety, QOL, and physical exercise. The intervention consisted of week-long daily ski sessions with professional ski guides as well as dedicated physicians present. The participants were handed questionnaires, including distress and QOL items before, during, and after the intervention. Using fitness watches, exercise intensity was also tracked at these timepoints. During the intervention, patients were checked for adverse events daily. Fifteen participants, nine patients after multidisciplinary treatment, and six relatives were included in the study. Additionally, 13 children participated in the exercise, but not in the study. All of the participants completed the entire program. No severe adverse events were documented during daily checks. There was a strong increase in quantified activity and QOL with a corresponding decrease in distress during the intervention, and, partly, afterwards. This prospective brain tumor rehabilitation study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of challenging ski exercise in brain tumor patients. The findings also underline the exercise-mediated QOL benefits, emphasizing the need for more comprehensive brain tumor rehabilitation programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of a Multicomponent Exercise Program in Older Adults with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer during Adjuvant/Palliative Treatment: An Intervention Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(3), 862; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9030862 - 21 Mar 2020
Abstract
Clinical intervention studies support the efficacy and safety of exercise programs as a treatment modality for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during adjuvant/palliative treatment, but the effectiveness of real-world oncogeriatric services is yet to be established. We aimed to examine the effects of a [...] Read more.
Clinical intervention studies support the efficacy and safety of exercise programs as a treatment modality for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during adjuvant/palliative treatment, but the effectiveness of real-world oncogeriatric services is yet to be established. We aimed to examine the effects of a 10-week structured and individualized multicomponent exercise program on physical/cognitive functioning and mental wellness in elderly patients with NSCLC under adjuvant therapy or palliative treatment. A non-randomized, opportunistic control, longitudinal-design trial was conducted on 26 patients with NSCLC stage I–IV. Of 34 eligible participants, 21 were allocated into two groups: (i) control group (n = 7) received usual medical care; and (ii) intervention group (n =19) received multicomponent program sessions, including endurance, strength, balance, coordination and stretching exercises. Tests included the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), 5-m habitual Gait Velocity Test (GVT), Timed Up & Go Test (TUG), 6-Min Walk Test (6MWT), independence of activities in daily living (IADL), muscular performance, cognitive function, and quality of life, which were measured at baseline and after 10 weeks of the program. Results revealed a significant group×time interaction for SPPB (p = 0.004), 5-m GVT (p = 0.036), TUG (p = 0.007), and muscular performance (chest and leg power; p < 0.001). Similarly, significant changes were observed between groups for cognitive functioning (p = 0.021) and quality of life for EUROQoL 5D (p = 0.006). Our findings confirm that a multicomponent exercise program improves measures of physical/cognitive functioning and quality of life in the elderly with NSCLC under adjuvant therapy or palliative treatment. This is an interesting and important study that adds to our current body of knowledge on the safety of exercise interventions, especially in the elderly with solid tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship)
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