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Open AccessArticle

Patient and Medical Oncologists’ Perspectives on Prescribed Lifestyle Intervention—Experiences of Women with Breast Cancer and Providers

1
College of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
2
BC Cancer, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1G1, Canada
3
Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 2W6, Canada
4
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada
5
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, 212, 2177 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(9), 2815; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092815
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 18 August 2020 / Accepted: 27 August 2020 / Published: 31 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship)
This study explored the perspectives and experiences of breast cancer patients and medical oncologists with regards to participation in a lifestyle intervention at a tertiary cancer treatment center. A thematic approach was used to understand the context within which a lifestyle intervention was recommended and experienced, to inform future lifestyle programming and promote uptake. Twelve women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy and eight medical oncologists completed interviews. Findings suggest receiving a prescription for a lifestyle intervention from a trusted health professional was influential to women with breast cancer. The intervention offered physical, psychological, emotional, social, and informational benefits to the women and oncologists perceived both physiological and relational benefit to prescribing the intervention. Challenges focused on program access and tailored interventions. Lifestyle prescriptions are perceived by women with breast cancer to have numerous benefits and may promote lifestyle interventions and build rapport between oncologists and women. Oncology healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in motivating women’s participation in lifestyle interventions during breast cancer treatment. Maintenance programs that transition patients into community settings and provide on-going information and follow-up are needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: breast neoplasms; diet therapy; exercise; non-drug; prescriptions; qualitative research breast neoplasms; diet therapy; exercise; non-drug; prescriptions; qualitative research
MDPI and ACS Style

Balneaves, L.G.; Truant, T.L.O.; Van Patten, C.; Kirkham, A.A.; Waters, E.; Campbell, K.L. Patient and Medical Oncologists’ Perspectives on Prescribed Lifestyle Intervention—Experiences of Women with Breast Cancer and Providers. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 2815. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092815

AMA Style

Balneaves LG, Truant TLO, Van Patten C, Kirkham AA, Waters E, Campbell KL. Patient and Medical Oncologists’ Perspectives on Prescribed Lifestyle Intervention—Experiences of Women with Breast Cancer and Providers. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(9):2815. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092815

Chicago/Turabian Style

Balneaves, Lynda G.; Truant, Tracy L.O.; Van Patten, Cheri; Kirkham, Amy A.; Waters, Erin; Campbell, Kristin L. 2020. "Patient and Medical Oncologists’ Perspectives on Prescribed Lifestyle Intervention—Experiences of Women with Breast Cancer and Providers" J. Clin. Med. 9, no. 9: 2815. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092815

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