Special Issue "Biology and Management of Sap-Sucking Pests"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Pest and Vector Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nickolas G. Kavallieratos
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Agricultural Zoology and Entomology, Department of Crop Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 11855, Attica, Greece
Interests: stored product protection; chemical control; non-chemical control; stored product insect biology and ecology; trapping and sampling
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. David Wari
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Okayama University, Institute of Plant Science and Resources, Kurashiki, Okayama 710-0046, Japan
Interests: integrated pest management; biological control, environmental science; plant protection; molecular biology; agricultural and applied entomology; insecticide resistance; insect rearing; insect ecology; metabolomics; chemical ecology; tritrophic interactions; plant-insect interactions; plant-microbe-insect interactions; plant defense
Dr. Kazumu Kuramitsu
Website
Guest Editor
University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan
Interests: insect ecology; agricultural entomology; ecology and evolution entomology; integrated pest management; ecology parasitology; plant protection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sap-sucking pests such as brown plant hoppers, whiteflies, aphids, mealybugs, etc. are herbivorous pests that suck the sap (containing vital nutrient-rich assimilates) of plants, yielding detriments in the plants and severely threatening their health. The detriments may not always be severe, however, the fact that the sucking pests can vector viral disease is becoming a serious threat to many major cash crops. Furthermore, as result of sucking nutrient-rich assimilates from the plants, large amounts of sticky feeding residues known as honeydew are produced and deposited on plants. The honeydew then supports the growth of various microbes on plant surfaces, leading to a sooty appearance of infested plants and hence promoting yield losses.

In this Special Issue, we intend to feature articles that deliberate the biology of the sucking pests; the tritrophic interactions between the sucking pests, the microbes they host, and the plants they attack; the plant defense mechanisms against the sucking pests; the biology, behavior, and ecology of natural enemies against the sucking pests; and the Integrated Pest Management strategies harmonizing environmentally sound biological control agents and conventional methods are all welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Nickolas G. Kavallieratos
Dr. David Wari
Dr. Kazumu Kuramitsu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sap-sucking pest biology plant-insect interaction plant–microbe–insect interactions plant defense mechanisms natural enemies integrated pest management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Resolving the Taxonomic Status of Potential Biocontrol Agents Belonging to the Neglected Genus Lipolexis Förster (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) with Descriptions of Six New Species
Insects 2020, 11(10), 667; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11100667 - 29 Sep 2020
Abstract
Lipolexis is a small genus in the subfamily Aphidiinae represented by one species in Europe (Lipolexis gracilis Förster) and by four in Asia (Lipolexis wuyiensis Chen, L. oregmae Gahan, L. myzakkaiae Pramanik and Raychaudhuri and L. pseudoscutellaris Pramanik and Raychaudhuri). Although [...] Read more.
Lipolexis is a small genus in the subfamily Aphidiinae represented by one species in Europe (Lipolexis gracilis Förster) and by four in Asia (Lipolexis wuyiensis Chen, L. oregmae Gahan, L. myzakkaiae Pramanik and Raychaudhuri and L. pseudoscutellaris Pramanik and Raychaudhuri). Although L. oregmae is employed in biological control programs against pest aphids, the last morphological study on the genus was completed over 50 years ago. This study employs an integrative approach (morphology and molecular analysis (COI barcode region)), to examine Lipolexis specimens that were sampled worldwide, including specimens from BOLD database. These results establish that two currently recognized species of Lipolexis (L. gracilis, L. oregmae) are actually a species complex and also reveal phylogenetic relationships within the genus. Six new species are described and a global key for the identification of Lipolexis species is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology and Management of Sap-Sucking Pests)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review of the Biology and Control of Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), with Special Reference to Biological Control Using Entomopathogenic Fungi
Insects 2020, 11(9), 619; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11090619 - 10 Sep 2020
Abstract
Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), consists of genetically diverse species known to cause significant destruction in several crops around the world. Nymphs and adults of B. tabaci cause damage to plants during feeding, and they can act as a virus vector, thus [...] Read more.
Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), consists of genetically diverse species known to cause significant destruction in several crops around the world. Nymphs and adults of B. tabaci cause damage to plants during feeding, and they can act as a virus vector, thus causing significant yield loss to crops in the tropical and subtropical regions. Chemical pesticides are widely used to control B. tabaci due to their immediate action, but this approach has several drawbacks including food safety issues, insecticide resistance, environmental pollution, and the effect on non-target organisms. A biological control agent using entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) has therefore been developed as an alternative against the conventional use of chemical pesticides in an integrated pest management (IPM) system to effectively control B. tabaci. It is apparent from this review that species of hyphomycetes fungi are the most common EPF used to effectively control B. tabaci, with the second instar being the most susceptible stage of infection. Therefore, this review article focuses specifically on the control of B. tabaci with special emphasis on the use of EPF as biological control agents and their integration in IPM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology and Management of Sap-Sucking Pests)
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