Special Issue "Applied Insect Reproductive Biology"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Physiology, Reproduction and Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Laura Sirot
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, The College of Wooster, 931 College Mall, Wooster, OH, 44691, USA
Interests: insect reproduction; seminal fluid proteins; pest management
Dr. Ferdinand Nanfack Minkeu
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Biology, The College of Wooster, 931 College Mall, Wooster, OH, 44691,USA
Interests: insect reproduction; seminal fluid proteins; mosquito borne viruses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The management of insect populations is important for a variety of reasons including conservation, pollination, food production, control of agricultural pests and pathogens, control of disease spread, and material production (e.g., silk). Management of insect populations depends on an understanding of many areas of biology, including ecology, evolution, physiology, molecular biology, nutritional sciences, and behavior. Insights from studies of reproductive biology have aided greatly in advancing techniques of insect population management. Although these aformentioned areas of insect management have largely been considered in isolation of each other, approaches used in one area have the potential to improve management in other areas. In this volume, we invite experts in the field of applied insect reproduction to present new research and reviews on the topic of how studies of insect reproduction can be applied to managing populations. As editors, we will look at themes that provide insights bridging the different areas of insect population management with the goal of generating increased dialogue and idea exchange between scientists working in these areas.

Prof. Laura Sirot
Guest Editor
Dr. Ferdinand Nanfack Minkeu
Co-Guest Editor 

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • insects
  • reproduction
  • food production
  • conservation
  • diseases
  • crops

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Identification and Characterization of MicroRNAs in Gonads of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
Insects 2021, 12(8), 749; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12080749 - 19 Aug 2021
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Abstract
The high fecundity of the most destructive pest Helicoverpa armigera and its great resistance risk to insecticides and Bt crops make the reproductive-destruction-based control of this pest extremely appealing. To find suitable targets for disruption of its reproduction, we observed the testis and [...] Read more.
The high fecundity of the most destructive pest Helicoverpa armigera and its great resistance risk to insecticides and Bt crops make the reproductive-destruction-based control of this pest extremely appealing. To find suitable targets for disruption of its reproduction, we observed the testis and ovary development of H. armigera and conducted deep sequencing of the ovary and testis small RNAs of H. armigera and quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) validation to identify reproduction-related micro RNAs (miRNAs). A total of 7,592,150 and 8,815,237 clean reads were obtained from the testis and ovary tissue, respectively. After further analysis, we obtained 173 novel and 74 known miRNAs from the two libraries. Among the 74 known miRNAs, 60 miRNAs existed in the ovary and 72 existed in the testis. Further RT-qPCR validation of 5 miRNAs from the ovary and 6 miRNAs from the testis confirmed 8 of them were indeed ovary- (miR-989a, miR-263-5p, miR-34) or testis-biased (miR-2763, miR-998, miR-2c, miR-2765, miR-252a-5p). The 8 ovary- or testis-biased miRNAs had a total of 30,172 putative non-redundant target transcripts, as predicted by miRanda and RNAhybrid. Many of these target transcripts are assigned to reproduction-related GO terms (e.g., oocyte maturation, vitellogenesis, spermatogenesis) and are members of multiple reproduction-related KEGG pathways, such as the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, oocyte meiosis, the insulin signaling pathway, and insect hormone biosynthesis. These results suggest that the 8 gonad-biased miRNAs play important roles in reproduction and may be used as the targets for the development of reproductive-destruction-based control of H. armigera and, possibly, other lepidopteran pests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Insect Reproductive Biology)
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Article
Effect of Duration of Exposure to Males on Female Reproductive Performance of the Green Lacewing, Chrysoperla agilis (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae)
Insects 2021, 12(6), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12060560 - 18 Jun 2021
Viewed by 451
Abstract
Chrysoperla agilis Henry et al. is one of the five cryptic species of the carnea group found in Europe. They are known to widely occur in agricultural fields and survive and reproduce in a wide range of temperatures. The reproductive biology of the [...] Read more.
Chrysoperla agilis Henry et al. is one of the five cryptic species of the carnea group found in Europe. They are known to widely occur in agricultural fields and survive and reproduce in a wide range of temperatures. The reproductive biology of the cryptic species is poorly known, especially regarding the number of matings required for the females’ maximum reproductive output. We recorded the egg production and longevity of virgin females, as well as of females that had access to males for 1 week or for their lifetime. Longevity of C. agilis females with access to males was similar whether these were present for 1 week or for their lifetime (64.8 and 66.1 days, respectively). On the other hand, oviposition was higher in the long-term exposure to males (302.1 vs. 421.1 eggs, respectively). Virgin females lived longer (94.1 days) than mated females and laid a low number (54.5) of (unfertile) eggs. Egg hatchability and progeny sex ratio were similar in treatments with males. Nevertheless, the highest value (0.1321) of intrinsic rate of increase (rm) was recorded when females were continuously exposed to males. These results are relevant to biological control and could be applicable in mass-rearing C. agilis and predicting its population dynamics in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Insect Reproductive Biology)
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Article
Association between the Effects of High Temperature on Fertility and Sleep in Female Intra-Specific Hybrids of Drosophila melanogaster
Insects 2021, 12(4), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040336 - 09 Apr 2021
Viewed by 513
Abstract
Humans and fruit flies demonstrate similarity in sleep-wake behavior, e.g., in the pattern of sleep disturbances caused by an exposure to high temperature. Although research has provided evidence for a clear connection between sleeping problems and infertility in women, very little is known [...] Read more.
Humans and fruit flies demonstrate similarity in sleep-wake behavior, e.g., in the pattern of sleep disturbances caused by an exposure to high temperature. Although research has provided evidence for a clear connection between sleeping problems and infertility in women, very little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying this connection. Studies of dysgenic crosses of fruit flies revealed that an exposure to elevated temperature induces sterility in female intra-specific hybrids exclusively in one of two cross directions (progeny of Canton-S females crossed with Harwich males). Given the complexity and limitations of human studies, this fruit flies’ model of temperature-sensitive sterility might be used for testing whether the effects of high temperature on fertility and on 24-h sleep pattern are inter-related. To document this pattern, 315 hybrids were kept for at least five days in constant darkness at 20 °C and 29 °C. No evidence was found for a causal link between sterility and sleep disturbance. However, a diminished thermal responsiveness of sleep was shown by females with temperature-induced sterility, while significant responses to high temperature were still observed in fertile females obtained by crossing in the opposite direction (i.e., Canton-S males with Harwich females) and in fertile males from either cross. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Insect Reproductive Biology)
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