Special Issue "Feature Paper in Informatics"

A special issue of Informatics (ISSN 2227-9709).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Antony Bryant
Website
Guest Editor
Leeds Beckett University, Headingley Campus, Leeds LS6 3QS, UK
Interests: business process modelling and integration; complexity & chaos theory; formal specification; grounded theory method; information systems development; informatics & information management; knowledge management; methods integration; object orientation; process improvement & capability maturity; qualitative research approaches - particularly grounded theory; research philosophy & methods; software engineering; standards and standardization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue “Feature Papers in Informatics” aims to publish high-quality articles covering all fields of Informatics. Its scope includes but is not limited to biomedical and health informatics, social informatics, as well as machine learning, data mining and analytics, human computer interaction, and information and communication systems. If your paper is well prepared and approved for further publication, you might be eligible for discounts for your publication.

Prof. Dr. Antony Bryant
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Informatics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Review of Kalah Game Research and the Proposition of a Novel Heuristic–Deterministic Algorithm Compared to Tree-Search Solutions and Human Decision-Making
Informatics 2020, 7(3), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7030034 - 14 Sep 2020
Abstract
The Kalah game represents the most popular version of probably the oldest board game ever—the Mancala game. From this viewpoint, the art of playing Kalah can contribute to cultural heritage. This paper primarily focuses on a review of Kalah history and on a [...] Read more.
The Kalah game represents the most popular version of probably the oldest board game ever—the Mancala game. From this viewpoint, the art of playing Kalah can contribute to cultural heritage. This paper primarily focuses on a review of Kalah history and on a survey of research made so far for solving and analyzing the Kalah game (and some other related Mancala games). This review concludes that even if strong in-depth tree-search solutions for some types of the game were already published, it is still reasonable to develop less time-consumptive and computationally-demanding playing algorithms and their strategies Therefore, the paper also presents an original heuristic algorithm based on particular deterministic strategies arising from the analysis of the game rules. Standard and modified mini–max tree-search algorithms are introduced as well. A simple C++ application with Qt framework is developed to perform the algorithm verification and comparative experiments. Two sets of benchmark tests are made; namely, a tournament where a mid–experienced amateur human player competes with the three algorithms is introduced first. Then, a round-robin tournament of all the algorithms is presented. It can be deduced that the proposed heuristic algorithm has comparable success to the human player and to low-depth tree-search solutions. Moreover, multiple-case experiments proved that the opening move has a decisive impact on winning or losing. Namely, if the computer plays first, the human opponent cannot beat it. Contrariwise, if it starts to play second, using the heuristic algorithm, it nearly always loses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Modelling User Preference for Embodied Artificial Intelligence and Appearance in Realistic Humanoid Robots
Informatics 2020, 7(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7030028 - 31 Jul 2020
Abstract
Realistic humanoid robots (RHRs) with embodied artificial intelligence (EAI) have numerous applications in society as the human face is the most natural interface for communication and the human body the most effective form for traversing the manmade areas of the planet. Thus, developing [...] Read more.
Realistic humanoid robots (RHRs) with embodied artificial intelligence (EAI) have numerous applications in society as the human face is the most natural interface for communication and the human body the most effective form for traversing the manmade areas of the planet. Thus, developing RHRs with high degrees of human-likeness provides a life-like vessel for humans to physically and naturally interact with technology in a manner insurmountable to any other form of non-biological human emulation. This study outlines a human–robot interaction (HRI) experiment employing two automated RHRs with a contrasting appearance and personality. The selective sample group employed in this study is composed of 20 individuals, categorised by age and gender for a diverse statistical analysis. Galvanic skin response, facial expression analysis, and AI analytics permitted cross-analysis of biometric and AI data with participant testimonies to reify the results. This study concludes that younger test subjects preferred HRI with a younger-looking RHR and the more senior age group with an older looking RHR. Moreover, the female test group preferred HRI with an RHR with a younger appearance and male subjects with an older looking RHR. This research is useful for modelling the appearance and personality of RHRs with EAI for specific jobs such as care for the elderly and social companions for the young, isolated, and vulnerable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Rapid Development of Competitive Translation Engines for Access to Multilingual COVID-19 Information
Informatics 2020, 7(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7020019 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Every day, more people are becoming infected and dying from exposure to COVID-19. Some countries in Europe like Spain, France, the UK and Italy have suffered particularly badly from the virus. Others such as Germany appear to have coped extremely well. Both health [...] Read more.
Every day, more people are becoming infected and dying from exposure to COVID-19. Some countries in Europe like Spain, France, the UK and Italy have suffered particularly badly from the virus. Others such as Germany appear to have coped extremely well. Both health professionals and the general public are keen to receive up-to-date information on the effects of the virus, as well as treatments that have proven to be effective. In cases where language is a barrier to access of pertinent information, machine translation (MT) may help people assimilate information published in different languages. Our MT systems trained on COVID-19 data are freely available for anyone to use to help translate information (such as promoting good practice for symptom identification, prevention, and treatment) published in German, French, Italian, Spanish into English, as well as the reverse direction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Quantifying the Effect of Machine Translation in a High-Quality Human Translation Production Process
Informatics 2020, 7(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7020012 - 23 Apr 2020
Abstract
This paper studies the impact of machine translation (MT) on the translation workflow at the Directorate-General for Translation (DGT), focusing on two language pairs and two MT paradigms: English-into-French with statistical MT and English-into-Finnish with neural MT. We collected data from 20 professional [...] Read more.
This paper studies the impact of machine translation (MT) on the translation workflow at the Directorate-General for Translation (DGT), focusing on two language pairs and two MT paradigms: English-into-French with statistical MT and English-into-Finnish with neural MT. We collected data from 20 professional translators at DGT while they carried out real translation tasks in normal working conditions. The participants enabled/disabled MT for half of the segments in each document. They filled in a survey at the end of the logging period. We measured the productivity gains (or losses) resulting from the use of MT and examined the relationship between technical effort and temporal effort. The results show that while the usage of MT leads to productivity gains on average, this is not the case for all translators. Moreover, the two technical effort indicators used in this study show weak correlations with post-editing time. The translators’ perception of their speed gains was more or less in line with the actual results. Reduction of typing effort is the most frequently mentioned reason why participants preferred working with MT, but also the psychological benefits of not having to start from scratch were often mentioned. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Snapshot of Bystander Attitudes about Mobile Live-Streaming Video in Public Settings
Informatics 2020, 7(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7020010 - 27 Mar 2020
Abstract
With the advent of mobile apps such as Periscope, Facebook Live, and now TikTok, live-streaming video has become a commonplace form of social computing. It has not been clear, however, to what extent the current ubiquity of smartphones is impacting this technology’s acceptance [...] Read more.
With the advent of mobile apps such as Periscope, Facebook Live, and now TikTok, live-streaming video has become a commonplace form of social computing. It has not been clear, however, to what extent the current ubiquity of smartphones is impacting this technology’s acceptance in everyday social situations, and how mobile contexts or affordances will affect and be affected by shifts in social norms and policy debates regarding privacy, surveillance, and intellectual property. This ethnographic-style research provides a snapshot of attitudes about the technology among a sample of US participants in two public contexts, both held outdoors in August 2016: A sports tailgating event and a meeting event. Interviews with n = 20 bystanders revealed that many are not fully aware of when their image or speech is being live-streamed in a casual context, and some want stronger notifications of and ability to consent to such broadcasting. We offer design recommendations to help bridge this socio-technical gap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Modern Scientific Visualizations on the Web
Informatics 2020, 7(4), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7040037 - 24 Sep 2020
Abstract
Modern scientific visualization is web-based and uses emerging technology such as WebGL (Web Graphics Library) and WebGPU for three-dimensional computer graphics and WebXR for augmented and virtual reality devices. These technologies, paired with the accessibility of websites, potentially offer a user experience beyond [...] Read more.
Modern scientific visualization is web-based and uses emerging technology such as WebGL (Web Graphics Library) and WebGPU for three-dimensional computer graphics and WebXR for augmented and virtual reality devices. These technologies, paired with the accessibility of websites, potentially offer a user experience beyond traditional standalone visualization systems. We review the state-of-the-art of web-based scientific visualization and present an overview of existing methods categorized by application domain. As part of this analysis, we introduce the Scientific Visualization Future Readiness Score (SciVis FRS) to rank visualizations for a technology-driven disruptive tomorrow. We then summarize challenges, current state of the publication trend, future directions, and opportunities for this exciting research field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
What the Web Has Wrought
Informatics 2020, 7(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7020015 - 19 May 2020
Abstract
In 1989, Sir Tim Berners-Lee proposed the development of ‘a large hypertext database with typed links’, which eventually became The World Wide Web. It was rightly heralded at the time as a significant development and a boon for one-and-all as the digital [...] Read more.
In 1989, Sir Tim Berners-Lee proposed the development of ‘a large hypertext database with typed links’, which eventually became The World Wide Web. It was rightly heralded at the time as a significant development and a boon for one-and-all as the digital age flourished both in terms of universal accessibility and affordability. The general anticipation was that this could herald an era of universal friendship and knowledge-sharing, ushering in global cooperation and mutual regard. In November 2019, marking 30 years of the Web, Berners-Lee lamented that its initial promise was being largely undermined, and that we were in danger of heading towards a ‘digital dystopia’: What happened? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
Back to TopTop