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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

An Affective and Cognitive Toy to Support Mood Disorders

1
Department of Technologies and Information Systems, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain
2
eSmile, Psychology for Children & Adolescents, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Informatics 2020, 7(4), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7040048
Received: 22 September 2020 / Revised: 23 October 2020 / Accepted: 28 October 2020 / Published: 31 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
Affective computing is a branch of artificial intelligence that aims at processing and interpreting emotions. In this study, we implemented sensors/actuators into a stuffed toy mammoth, which allows the toy to have an affective and cognitive basis to its communication. The goal is for therapists to use this as a tool during their therapy sessions that work with patients with mood disorders. The toy detects emotion and provides a dialogue that would guide a session aimed at working with emotional regulation and perception. These technical capabilities are possible by employing IBM Watson’s services, implemented into a Raspberry Pi Zero. In this paper, we delve into its evaluation with neurotypical adolescents, a panel of experts, and other professionals. The evaluation aims were to perform a technical and application validation for use in therapy sessions. The results of the evaluations are generally positive, with an 87% accuracy for emotion recognition, and an average usability score of 77.5 for experts (n = 5), and 64.35 for professionals (n = 23). We add to that information some of the issues encountered, its effects on applicability, and future work to be done. View Full-Text
Keywords: human–computer interaction; affective computing; cognitive computing; sensorized toy; emotion; embodied conversational agent human–computer interaction; affective computing; cognitive computing; sensorized toy; emotion; embodied conversational agent
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Johnson, E.; González, I.; Mondéjar, T.; Cabañero-Gómez, L.; Fontecha, J.; Hervás, R. An Affective and Cognitive Toy to Support Mood Disorders. Informatics 2020, 7, 48.

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