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Article

A Snapshot of Bystander Attitudes about Mobile Live-Streaming Video in Public Settings

1
Human-Computer Interaction Institute, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2
Department of Human-Centered Computing, School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Informatics 2020, 7(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7020010
Received: 26 February 2020 / Revised: 17 March 2020 / Accepted: 25 March 2020 / Published: 27 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Informatics)
With the advent of mobile apps such as Periscope, Facebook Live, and now TikTok, live-streaming video has become a commonplace form of social computing. It has not been clear, however, to what extent the current ubiquity of smartphones is impacting this technology’s acceptance in everyday social situations, and how mobile contexts or affordances will affect and be affected by shifts in social norms and policy debates regarding privacy, surveillance, and intellectual property. This ethnographic-style research provides a snapshot of attitudes about the technology among a sample of US participants in two public contexts, both held outdoors in August 2016: A sports tailgating event and a meeting event. Interviews with n = 20 bystanders revealed that many are not fully aware of when their image or speech is being live-streamed in a casual context, and some want stronger notifications of and ability to consent to such broadcasting. We offer design recommendations to help bridge this socio-technical gap. View Full-Text
Keywords: live streaming; Periscope; Facebook Live; TikTok; mobile video; privacy; surveillance; ubiquitous computing; human–computer interaction; intellectual property live streaming; Periscope; Facebook Live; TikTok; mobile video; privacy; surveillance; ubiquitous computing; human–computer interaction; intellectual property
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MDPI and ACS Style

Faklaris, C.; Cafaro, F.; Blevins, A.; O’Haver, M.A.; Singhal, N. A Snapshot of Bystander Attitudes about Mobile Live-Streaming Video in Public Settings. Informatics 2020, 7, 10. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7020010

AMA Style

Faklaris C, Cafaro F, Blevins A, O’Haver MA, Singhal N. A Snapshot of Bystander Attitudes about Mobile Live-Streaming Video in Public Settings. Informatics. 2020; 7(2):10. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7020010

Chicago/Turabian Style

Faklaris, Cori, Francesco Cafaro, Asa Blevins, Matthew A. O’Haver, and Neha Singhal. 2020. "A Snapshot of Bystander Attitudes about Mobile Live-Streaming Video in Public Settings" Informatics 7, no. 2: 10. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7020010

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