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Special Issue "Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Woo-Sik Jeong

Department of Food and Life Sciences, Inje University, Gimhae 50834, South Korea
E-Mail
Phone: +82-55-320-3238
Interests: phytochemicals; phytochemical-drug interaction; skin health; hair growth; nutraceuticals; nutricosmetics; chemoprevention; antioxidant; detoxifying enzyme; inflammation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The skin is the largest organ of the body, which protects the internal organs by serving as an excellent barrier against chemical and biological hazards. Skin disorders and/or skin aging are caused by both intrinsic (e.g., genetic mutation, cellular metabolism and hormone changes) and extrinsic factors (e.g., chemicals, toxins, pollutants, microbial infections and ultraviolet ray). Hair is one of the vital skin appendages, which plays an important role in thermoregulation, physical protection, dispersion of sweat and sebum, sensory and tactile activities, and social activity. Recently, an increasing number of people in both men and women have been enduring hair loss or alopecia, which is an emotionally distressing disease in humans. A growing interest is being placed on natural compounds including both nutrients and phytochemicals toward the prevention and treatment of skin disorder, skin aging and hair loss. This field is now classified as “nutricosmetics” or “phytodermatology”.

This Special Issue calls for original research articles and full/mini reviews that address the progress and current understanding in the overlapping research topics of “Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health”.

Prof. Dr. Woo-Sik Jeong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • phytochemicals
  • nutrients
  • skin health
  • nutricosmetics
  • phytodermatology
  • skin carcinogenesis
  • melanoma
  • dermatitis
  • acne
  • melasma
  • hair growth
  • hair loss
  • alopecia

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Ulmus macrocarpa Hance Extracts Attenuated H2O2 and UVB-Induced Skin Photo-Aging by Activating Antioxidant Enzymes and Inhibiting MAPK Pathways
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(6), 1200; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061200
Received: 6 March 2017 / Revised: 19 May 2017 / Accepted: 30 May 2017 / Published: 5 June 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2558 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To protect from reactive oxygen species (ROS) damages, skin cells have evolved to have antioxidant enzymes, such as copper and zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD1), mitochondrial manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione reductase (GR), and suppressed the expression of
[...] Read more.
To protect from reactive oxygen species (ROS) damages, skin cells have evolved to have antioxidant enzymes, such as copper and zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD1), mitochondrial manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione reductase (GR), and suppressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Bioactive compounds analyses were performed using a high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA) system. The antioxidant activity of Ulmus macrocarpa Hance (UMH) extracts was estimated in vitro. The anti-aging activity of UMH extracts was estimated in vivo using the SKH-1 hairless mice. The UMH extracts reduced the H2O2-induced intracellular ROS production and the cell damages in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Moreover, the H2O2-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was detected in HDF and UMH extracts blocked the phosphorylation. These results suggest that UMH extracts can reduce the expression of MMPs and the reduced MMPs lead to the inhibition of collagen degradation. In addition, oral administration of the UMH extracts decreased the depth, thickness, and length of wrinkles on UVB exposed hairless mice. Therefore, UMH extracts play an advantage of the functional materials in antioxidant and anti-aging of skin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health)
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Open AccessArticle Plumbagin Suppresses α-MSH-Induced Melanogenesis in B16F10 Mouse Melanoma Cells by Inhibiting Tyrosinase Activity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 320; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18020320
Received: 29 December 2016 / Revised: 22 January 2017 / Accepted: 26 January 2017 / Published: 3 February 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2012 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent studies have shown that plumbagin has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, antibacterial, and anti-cancer activities; however, it has not yet been shown whether plumbagin suppresses alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced melanin synthesis to prevent hyperpigmentation. In this study, we demonstrated that plumbagin significantly suppresses α-MSH-stimulated melanin
[...] Read more.
Recent studies have shown that plumbagin has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, antibacterial, and anti-cancer activities; however, it has not yet been shown whether plumbagin suppresses alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced melanin synthesis to prevent hyperpigmentation. In this study, we demonstrated that plumbagin significantly suppresses α-MSH-stimulated melanin synthesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. To understand the inhibitory mechanism of plumbagin on melanin synthesis, we performed cellular or cell-free tyrosinase activity assays and analyzed melanogenesis-related gene expression. We demonstrated that plumbagin directly suppresses tyrosinase activity independent of the transcriptional machinery associated with melanogenesis, which includes micropthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase (TYR), and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1). We also investigated whether plumbagin was toxic to normal human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and lens epithelial cells (B3) that may be injured by using skin-care cosmetics. Surprisingly, lower plumbagin concentrations (0.5–1 μM) effectively inhibited melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity but do not cause toxicity in keratinocytes, lens epithelial cells, and B16F10 mouse melanoma cells, suggesting that plumbagin is safe for dermal application. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effect of plumbagin to pigmentation may make it an acceptable and safe component for use in skin-care cosmetic formulations used for skin whitening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health)
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Open AccessArticle Exopolysaccharides Isolated from Milk Fermented with Lactic Acid Bacteria Prevent Ultraviolet-Induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18010146
Received: 14 November 2016 / Revised: 5 January 2017 / Accepted: 6 January 2017 / Published: 13 January 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (3331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Background: We studied the mechanism by which fermented milk ameliorates UV-B-induced skin damage and determined the active components in milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria by evaluating erythema formation, dryness, epidermal proliferation, DNA damage and cytokine mRNA levels in hairless mice exposed to
[...] Read more.
Background: We studied the mechanism by which fermented milk ameliorates UV-B-induced skin damage and determined the active components in milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria by evaluating erythema formation, dryness, epidermal proliferation, DNA damage and cytokine mRNA levels in hairless mice exposed to acute UV-B irradiation. Methods: Nine week-old hairless mice were given fermented milk (1.3 g/kg BW/day) or exopolysaccharide (EPS) concentrate (70 mg/kg BW/day) orally for ten days. Seven days after fermented milk or EPS administration began, the dorsal skin of the mice was exposed to a single dose of UV-B (20 mJ/cm2). Results: Ingestion of either fermented milk or EPS significantly attenuated UV-B-induced erythema formation, dryness and epidermal proliferation in mouse skin. Both fermented milk and EPS were associated with a significant decrease in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and upregulated mRNA levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA), which is involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, administration of either fermented milk or EPS significantly suppressed increases in the ratio of interleukin (IL)-10/IL-12a and IL-10/interferon-gamma mRNA levels. Conclusion: Together, these results indicate that EPS isolated from milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria enhanced DNA repair mechanisms and modulated skin immunity to protect skin against UV damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Message in a Bottle: Dialog between Intestine and Skin Modulated by Probiotics
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(6), 1067; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061067
Received: 30 March 2017 / Revised: 10 May 2017 / Accepted: 11 May 2017 / Published: 9 June 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (249 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
At the beginning, probiotics were used exclusively for gastrointestinal conditions. However, over the years, evidence has shown that probiotics exert systemic effects. In this review article, we will summarize recent reports that postulate probiotic treatment as an efficient one against skin pathologies, such
[...] Read more.
At the beginning, probiotics were used exclusively for gastrointestinal conditions. However, over the years, evidence has shown that probiotics exert systemic effects. In this review article, we will summarize recent reports that postulate probiotic treatment as an efficient one against skin pathologies, such as cancer, allergy, photoaging and skin infections. The focus will be restricted to oral probiotics that could potentially counteract the ultraviolet irradiation-induced skin alterations. Moreover, the possible underlying mechanisms by which probiotics can impact on the gut and exert their skin effects will be reviewed. Furthermore, how the local and systemic immune system is involved in the intestine-cutaneous crosstalk will be analyzed. In conclusion, this article will be divided into three core ideas: (a) probiotics regulate gut homeostasis; (b) gut and skin homeostasis are connected; (c) probiotics are a potentially effective treatment against skin conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health)
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Open AccessReview Resveratrol, 4′ Acetoxy Resveratrol, R-equol, Racemic Equol or S-equol as Cosmeceuticals to Improve Dermal Health
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(6), 1193; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061193
Received: 25 February 2017 / Revised: 31 May 2017 / Accepted: 31 May 2017 / Published: 3 June 2017
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (716 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Phytochemicals are botanical compounds used in dermatology applications as cosmeceuticals to improve skin health. Resveratrol and equol are two of the best-known polyphenolic or phytoestrogens having similar chemical structures and some overlapping biological functions to 17β-estradiol. Human skin gene expression was reviewed for
[...] Read more.
Phytochemicals are botanical compounds used in dermatology applications as cosmeceuticals to improve skin health. Resveratrol and equol are two of the best-known polyphenolic or phytoestrogens having similar chemical structures and some overlapping biological functions to 17β-estradiol. Human skin gene expression was reviewed for 28 different biomarkers when resveratrol, 4′ acetoxy resveratrol (4AR), R-equol, racemic equol or S-equol were tested. Sirtuin 1 activator (SIRT 1) was stimulated by resveratrol and 4AR only. Resveratrol, R-equol and racemic equol were effective on the aging biomarkers proliferating cell nuclear factor (PCNA), nerve growth factor (NGF), 5α-reductase and the calcium binding proteins S100 A8 and A9. Racemic equol and 4AR displayed among the highest levels for the collagens, elastin and tissue inhibitor of the matrix metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP 1). S-equol displayed the lowest level of effectiveness compared to the other compounds. The 4AR analog was more effective compared to resveratrol by 1.6-fold. R-equol and racemic equol were almost equal in potency displaying greater inhibition vs. resveratrol or its 4′ analog for the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), but among the inflammatory biomarkers, resveratrol, 4AR, R-equol and racemic equol displayed high inhibition. Thus, these cosmeceuticals display promise to improve dermal health; however, further study is warranted to understand how phytochemicals protect/enhance the skin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health)
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Open AccessReview Edible Plants and Their Influence on the Gut Microbiome and Acne
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 1070; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18051070
Received: 31 March 2017 / Revised: 28 April 2017 / Accepted: 8 May 2017 / Published: 17 May 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1411 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Acne vulgaris affects most people at some point in their lives. Due to unclear etiology, likely with multiple factors, targeted and low-risk treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we explore the multiple causes of acne and how plant-based foods and
[...] Read more.
Acne vulgaris affects most people at some point in their lives. Due to unclear etiology, likely with multiple factors, targeted and low-risk treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we explore the multiple causes of acne and how plant-based foods and supplements can control these. The proposed causative factors include insulin resistance, sex hormone imbalances, inflammation and microbial dysbiosis. There is an emerging body of work on the human gut microbiome and how it mediates feedback between the foods we eat and our bodies. The gut microbiome is also an important mediator of inflammation in the gut and systemically. A low-glycemic load diet, one rich in plant fibers and low in processed foods, has been linked to an improvement in acne, possibly through gut changes or attenuation of insulin levels. Though there is much interest in the human microbiome, there is much more unknown, especially along the gut-skin axis. Collectively, the evidence suggests that approaches such as plant-based foods and supplements may be a viable alternative to the current first line standard of care for moderate acne, which typically includes antibiotics. Though patient compliance with major dietary changes is likely much lower than with medications, it is a treatment avenue that warrants further study and development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health)
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Open AccessReview The Role of Phytochemicals in the Inflammatory Phase of Wound Healing
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 1068; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18051068
Received: 30 March 2017 / Revised: 10 May 2017 / Accepted: 13 May 2017 / Published: 16 May 2017
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (2125 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Historically, plant-based products have been the basis of medicine since before the advent of modern Western medicine. Wound dressings made of honey, curcumin and other phytochemical-rich compounds have been traditionally used. Recently, the mechanisms behind many of these traditional therapies have come to
[...] Read more.
Historically, plant-based products have been the basis of medicine since before the advent of modern Western medicine. Wound dressings made of honey, curcumin and other phytochemical-rich compounds have been traditionally used. Recently, the mechanisms behind many of these traditional therapies have come to light. In this review, we show that in the context of wound healing, there is a global theme of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant phytochemicals in traditional medicine. Although promising, we discuss the limitations of using some of these phytochemicals in order to warrant more research, ideally in randomized clinical trial settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health)
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Open AccessReview Polyphenols and Sunburn
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(9), 1521; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17091521
Received: 3 August 2016 / Revised: 31 August 2016 / Accepted: 2 September 2016 / Published: 9 September 2016
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (410 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polyphenols are antioxidant molecules found in many foods such as green tea, chocolate, grape seeds, and wine. Polyphenols have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antineoplastic properties. Growing evidence suggests that polyphenols may be used for the prevention of sunburns as polyphenols decrease the damaging effects
[...] Read more.
Polyphenols are antioxidant molecules found in many foods such as green tea, chocolate, grape seeds, and wine. Polyphenols have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antineoplastic properties. Growing evidence suggests that polyphenols may be used for the prevention of sunburns as polyphenols decrease the damaging effects of ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the skin. This review was conducted to examine the evidence for use of topically and orally ingested polyphenols in prevention of sunburns. The PubMed database was searched for studies that examined polyphenols and its effects on sunburns. Of the 27 studies found, 15 met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies were conducted on human subjects and eight on animals (mice and rats). Eleven studies evaluated the effects of topical polyphenols, two studies examined ingested polyphenols, and two studies examined both topical and ingested polyphenols. Polyphenol sources included the following plant origins: green tea, white tea, cocoa, Romanian propolis (RP), Calluna vulgaris (Cv), grape seeds, honeybush, and Lepidium meyenii (maca). Eight studies examined green tea. Overall, based on the studies, there is evidence that polyphenols in both oral and topical form may provide protection from UV damage and sunburn, and thus are beneficial to skin health. However, current studies are limited and further research is necessary to evaluate the efficacy, mechanism of action, and potential side effects of various forms and concentrations of polyphenols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Phytochemicals for Skin Health)
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