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Special Issue "Cell-Specificity in Plants"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Raffaella Maria Balestrini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection (IPSP)-CNR, Torino, Italy
Interests: cell wall; genomics and fungal genomics of symbiotic fungi; mycorrhizal fungi; plant-microbe interactions; abiotic stresses
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Valentina Fiorilli
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy
Interests: molecular and cellular aspects of plant–microbe interactions, mainly during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; plant response to biotic stress; role of phytohormones in plant growth and in response to microbes; plant biology; plant nutrition; plant–microbe interactions; arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; mycorrhizal-induced resistance and susceptibility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant growth and interactions take place in a complex cellular environment. Organs are complex structures composed of different tissues characterized by distinct cell types. Each cell type has specific functions that are driven by its own unique transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Global cell-profiling studies can provide information on several transcripts unique to specialized cells or, at least, localized to a few cell types. The examination of functional processes at the molecular level suffers from the use of whole organs, and cell type-specific differences might be masked by this approach. Even if transcripts corresponding to genes of interest are very abundant in one or few cell types, their amount may be diluted within the whole RNA pool of a tissue. Studies aimed to describe protein and metabolite profiles are also complicated by the presence of multiple cell types. The application of different approaches, such as plant transformation, in situ hybridization, and, more recently, laser microdissection (LMD), has allowed the identification of the localized expression of specific genes in specific cell populations. This is particularly important for genes predominantly expressed in cell types that are present in a small number in the analyzed tissue.

Dr. Raffaella Maria Balestrini
Dr. Valentina Fiorilli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cell specificity
  • Laser microdissection
  • Proteomics
  • Metabolomics
  • Transcriptomics
  • In situ hybridization
  • Reporter gene
  • Plant interactions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
GLABRA2, a Common Regulator for Epidermal Cell Fate Determination and Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(20), 4997; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20204997 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
Epidermal cell fate determination—including trichome initiation, root hair formation, and flavonoid and mucilage biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana)—are controlled by a similar transcriptional regulatory network. In the network, it has been proposed that the MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) activator complexes formed by an [...] Read more.
Epidermal cell fate determination—including trichome initiation, root hair formation, and flavonoid and mucilage biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana)—are controlled by a similar transcriptional regulatory network. In the network, it has been proposed that the MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) activator complexes formed by an R2R3 MYB transcription factor, a bHLH transcription factor and the WD40-repeat protein TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1) regulate the expression of downstream genes required for cell fate determination, flavonoid or mucilage biosynthesis, respectively. In epidermal cell fate determination and mucilage biosynthesis, the MBW activator complexes activate the expression of GLABRA2 (GL2). GL2 is a homeodomain transcription factor that promotes trichome initiation in shoots, mucilage biosynthesis in seeds, and inhibits root hair formation in roots. The MBW activator complexes also activate several R3 MYB genes. The R3 MYB proteins, in turn, competing with the R2R3 MYBs for binding bHLH transcription factors, therefore inhibiting the formation of the MBW activator complexes, lead to the inhibition of trichome initiation in shoots, and promotion of root hair formation in roots. In flavonoid biosynthesis, the MBW activator complexes activate the expression of the late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, resulting in the production of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins. Research progress in recent years suggests that the transcriptional regulatory network that controls epidermal cell fate determination and anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is far more complicated than previously thought. In particular, more regulators of GL2 have been identified, and GL2 has been shown to be involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis. This review focuses on the research progress on the regulation of GL2 expression, and the roles of GL2 in the regulation of epidermal cell fate determination and anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell-Specificity in Plants)
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