ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Fusarium Mycotoxins"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Toxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Massimo Reverberi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Biology, Sapienza University, Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma, Italy
Tel. +390649917131; Fax: +39 06 49912435
Interests: Plant-pathogen interaction; Oxylipin-based cross-talk; Mycotoxins biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation; Microbial detoxification of mycotoxins; Image spectroscopy for fungal detection; Biosensors for toxin detection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fusarium species produces several mycotoxins spoiling crop products worldwide. Fusarium mycotoxins, known (e.g. trichothecenes) and emerging (e.g. enniatins), may have a toxic effect on both plants and animals (humans included) who ear plant products. Why do these fungal species produce mycotoxins? What they are needed for; and why are they sometimes produced in such huge amounts? These questions are the focus of present research. Moreover, original studies on this topic should also foster our knowledge of methods for detecting and quantifying Fusarium mycotoxins in different feed and foodstuffs, strategies for controlling them both at the pre- and post-harvest, and models to provide mycotoxin risk enhancement in relation to climate change and global trade. Studies published on this topic will represent a “golden basis” for further studies of Fusarium mycotoxins.

Prof. Dr. Massimo Reverberi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Known and emerging Fusarium mycotoxins
  • Host–pathogen interaction
  • Detection
  • Control
  • Provisional modelling

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Use of the Secreted Proteome of Trametes versicolor for Controlling the Cereal Pathogen Fusarium langsethiae
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(17), 4167; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20174167 - 26 Aug 2019
Abstract
Fusarium langsethiae is amongst the most recently discovered pathogens of small grains cereals. F. langsethiae is the main producer, in Europe, of T2 and HT-toxins in small grain cereals, albeit often asymptomatic; this makes its control challenging. The European Union (EU) is pushing [...] Read more.
Fusarium langsethiae is amongst the most recently discovered pathogens of small grains cereals. F. langsethiae is the main producer, in Europe, of T2 and HT-toxins in small grain cereals, albeit often asymptomatic; this makes its control challenging. The European Union (EU) is pushing hard on the use of biocontrol agents to minimize the use of fungicides and pesticides, which are detrimental to the environment and responsible for serious pollution of the soil and superficial water. In line with EU directives (e.g., 128/2009), here we report the use of protein fractions, purified from the culture filtrate of the basidiomycete Trametes versicolor, for controlling F. langsethiae. T. versicolor, a so-called medicinal mushroom which is applied as a co-adjuvant in oncology and other pathologies as a producer of biological response modifiers. In this study, the exo-proteome of T. versicolor proved highly efficient in inhibiting the growth of F. langsethiae and the biosynthesis of the T2 toxin. Results are promising for its future use as a sustainable product to control F. langsethiae infection in cereals under field conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fusarium Mycotoxins)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Molecular Identification and Disease Management of Date Palm Sudden Decline Syndrome in the United Arab Emirates
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(4), 923; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20040923 - 20 Feb 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Date palm orchards suffer from serious diseases, including sudden decline syndrome (SDS). External symptoms were characterized by whitening on one side of the rachis, progressing from the base to the apex of the leaf until the whole leaf dies; while the internal disease [...] Read more.
Date palm orchards suffer from serious diseases, including sudden decline syndrome (SDS). External symptoms were characterized by whitening on one side of the rachis, progressing from the base to the apex of the leaf until the whole leaf dies; while the internal disease symptoms included reddish roots and highly colored vascular bundles causing wilting and death of the tree. Although three Fusarium spp. (F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum and F. solani) were isolated from diseased root samples, the fungal pathogen F. solani was associated with SDS on date palm in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Fusarium spp. were identified based on their cultural and morphological characteristics. The internal transcribed spacer regions and large subunit of the ribosomal RNA (ITS/LSU rRNA) gene complex of the pathogens was further sequenced. Pathogenicity assays and disease severity indices confirm the main causal agent of SDS on date palm in the UAE is F. solani. Application of Cidely® Top (difenoconazole and cyflufenamid) significantly inhibited the fungal mycelial growth in vitro and reduced SDS development on date palm seedlings pre-inoculated with F. solani under greenhouse conditions. This is the first report confirming that the chemical fungicide Cidely® Top is strongly effective against SDS on date palm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fusarium Mycotoxins)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the miRNA Expression Profiles in the Zearalenone-Exposed TM3 Leydig Cell Line
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(3), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030635 - 01 Feb 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Zearalenone (ZEN), an important environmental pollutant, can cause serious harm to human and animal health. The aim of our study was to examine the effect of zearalenone (ZEN) on miRNA expression profiles in the mouse Leydig cell line (TM3 Leydig cell line) by [...] Read more.
Zearalenone (ZEN), an important environmental pollutant, can cause serious harm to human and animal health. The aim of our study was to examine the effect of zearalenone (ZEN) on miRNA expression profiles in the mouse Leydig cell line (TM3 Leydig cell line) by miRNA sequencing. The effect of ZEN on the viability of TM3 Leydig cells was verified by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). MiRNA sequencing was performed 24 h after the exposure of TM3 Leydig cells with 50 μmol/L of ZEN. Bioinformatics predicted the miRNA target genes, performed Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses, and conducted miRNA-gene-pathway mapping to show the relationship between miRNA, the target gene, and the signalling pathway. The expression levels of miRNA and the miRNA target genes associated with ZEN toxicology were verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The miRNA sequencing revealed a significant change (p < 0.05) in the 197 miRNAs in the ZEN-treated and control groups, among which 86 were up-regulated and 111 were down-regulated. GO analysis of the target genes of these miRNAs indicated various biological functions. KEGG analysis showed that the predicted miRNA target genes were involved in signalling pathways, such as cancer, apoptosis, and oxidation, namely, the Ras signalling pathway, Rap1 signalling pathway, PI3K-AKT signalling pathway, Foxo signalling pathway, and AMPK signalling pathway. These results suggest that ZEN, as an estrogen-like toxin, is regulated by microRNAs. Our results can help to examine the toxicological effects of ZEN-regulated miRNAs on germ cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fusarium Mycotoxins)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Critical Assessment of Streptomyces spp. Able to Control Toxigenic Fusaria in Cereals: A Literature and Patent Review
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(24), 6119; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20246119 - 04 Dec 2019
Abstract
Mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species on cereals represent a major concern for food safety worldwide. Fusarium toxins that are currently under regulation for their content in food include trichothecenes, fumonisins, and zearalenone. Biological control of Fusarium spp. has been widely explored with the [...] Read more.
Mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species on cereals represent a major concern for food safety worldwide. Fusarium toxins that are currently under regulation for their content in food include trichothecenes, fumonisins, and zearalenone. Biological control of Fusarium spp. has been widely explored with the aim of limiting disease occurrence, but few efforts have focused so far on limiting toxin accumulation in grains. The bacterial genus Streptomyces is responsible for the production of numerous drug molecules and represents a huge resource for the discovery of new molecules. Streptomyces spp. are also efficient plant colonizers and able to employ different mechanisms of control against toxigenic fungi on cereals. This review describes the outcomes of research using Streptomyces strains and/or their derived molecules to limit toxin production and/or contamination of Fusarium species in cereals. Both the scientific and patent literature were analyzed, starting from the year 2000, and we highlight promising results as well as the current pitfalls and limitations of this approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fusarium Mycotoxins)
Back to TopTop