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Special Issue "The Self-Assembly and Design of Polyfunctional Nanosystems"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 19 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Lucia Ya. Zakharova
Website
Guest Editor
Arbuzov Institute of Organic and Physical Chemistry – Subdivision of the Federal Research Center «Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences», Kazan, Russian Federation
Interests: amphiphilic compound; cationic surfactants; self-assembly; polyfunctional supramolecular systems; polyelectrolytes; micellar catalysis; solubilization; drug delivery
Prof. Ruslan R. Kashapov
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Arbuzov Institute of Organic and Physical Chemistry – Subdivision of the Federal Research Center «Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences», Kazan, Russian Federation
Interests: supramolecular chemistry; calixarenes; cyclodextrins; surfactants; quantum dots; drug delivery systems; biomimetics; sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute a full research paper or review article for peer-review and possible publication in our Special Issue “Self-Assembly and Design of Polyfunctional Nanosystems”. This Special Issue will be devoted to (i) fundamental aspects of self-assembly of amphiphilic compounds including surfactants, polymers, macrocycles, and mixed systems on their basis; (ii) potential application of these systems in practice, with special emphasis on drug delivery and other aspects of biomedicine; (iii) combination of aforementioned amphiphilic compounds with other nanomaterials resulting in new hybrid composite materials with diverse potential applications.

Prof. Lucia Ya. Zakharova
Prof. Ruslan R. Kashapov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • amphiphilic compounds
  • macrocycles
  • self-assembly
  • supramolecular systems
  • solubilization
  • drug delivery
  • bio- and nanotechnology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Bispicolyamine-Based Supramolecular Polymeric Gels Induced by Distinct Different Driving Forces with and Without Zn2+
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(13), 4617; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21134617 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
Metal-coordination polymeric gels are interesting areas as organic/inorganic hybrid supramolecular materials. The bispicolylamine (BPA) based gelator (1) showed excellent gelation with typical fibrillar morphology in acetonitrile. Upon complexing 1 with Zn2+, complexes ([1 + Zn + ACN]2+ [...] Read more.
Metal-coordination polymeric gels are interesting areas as organic/inorganic hybrid supramolecular materials. The bispicolylamine (BPA) based gelator (1) showed excellent gelation with typical fibrillar morphology in acetonitrile. Upon complexing 1 with Zn2+, complexes ([1 + Zn + ACN]2+ and [1 + zinc trifluoromethanesulfonate (ZnOTf)]+) with four coordination numbers were formed, which determine the gel structure significantly. A gel-sol transition was induced, driven by the ratio of the two metal complexes produced. Through nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, the driving forces in the gel formation (i.e., hydrogen-bonding and π–π stacking) were observed in detail. In the absence and the presence of Zn2+, the intermolecular hydrogen-bonds and π–π stacking were the primary driving forces in the gel formation, respectively. In addition, the supramolecular gels exhibited a monolayer lamellar structure irrespective of Zn2+. Conclusively, the gels’ elasticity and viscosity reduced in the presence of Zn2+. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Self-Assembly and Design of Polyfunctional Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization and Evaluation of Ternary Complexes of Ascorbic Acid with γ-Cyclodextrin and Poly(vinyl Alcohol)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(12), 4399; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21124399 - 20 Jun 2020
Abstract
Ascorbic acid (AA) is a general antioxidant used in aqueous pharmaceutical formulations. However, in aqueous solutions, AA is unstable and easily oxidized when exposed to air, light and/or heat. Cyclodextrins are well known for their ability to form inclusion complexes with various compounds [...] Read more.
Ascorbic acid (AA) is a general antioxidant used in aqueous pharmaceutical formulations. However, in aqueous solutions, AA is unstable and easily oxidized when exposed to air, light and/or heat. Cyclodextrins are well known for their ability to form inclusion complexes with various compounds to improve their solubility and stability. Previous studies demonstrate that cyclodextrins preserve the antioxidant capacity of AA but data for γ-cyclodextrin (γCD) have not been reported. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is a hydrophilic polymer widely used as a drug matrix in various pharmaceutical fields, but its application for drug stabilization is limited. This study aimed to investigate the protective ability of γCD on AA through the formation of ternary complexes with PVA. Binary (i.e., AA/γCD, AA/PVA and γCD/PVA) and ternary (i.e., AA/γCD/PVA) complexes were first confirmed. It was reported that those complexes were formed through interactions between the heterocyclic ring of AA, hydroxyl group of PVA and hydrophobic cavity of γCD. The hydrodynamic diameter of complexes was then studied. It was found that the diameter of γCD/PVA complexes increased with respect to the concentration of γCD. Higher γCD concentrations also resulted in increasing hydrodynamic diameters of the ternary complex. The presence of AA in ternary complexes interfered with the aggregation tendency of γCD/PVA binary complexes. Furthermore, the antioxidant capacity of AA in binary and ternary complexes was investigated. It was found that the presence of γCD preserved the antioxidant activity of AA, whereas PVA showed a contrasting effect. The influence of γCD and PVA concentration on antioxidant capacity was then studied through central composite design (CCD). Even though the concentration of γCD significantly affected the inhibition efficiency of the ternary complex, the insignificant influence of PVA could not be ignored. A promising protective ternary complex should consist of an optimized concentration of PVA and a high concentration of γCD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Self-Assembly and Design of Polyfunctional Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Modeling the Effect of Composition on Formation of Aerosolized Nanoemulsion System Encapsulating Docetaxel and Curcumin Using D-Optimal Mixture Experimental Design
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(12), 4357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21124357 - 19 Jun 2020
Abstract
The synergistic anticancer effect of docetaxel (DTX) and curcumin (CCM) has emerged as an attractive therapeutic candidate for lung cancer treatment. However, the lack of optimal bioavailability because of high toxicity, low stability, and poor solubility has limited their clinical success. Given this, [...] Read more.
The synergistic anticancer effect of docetaxel (DTX) and curcumin (CCM) has emerged as an attractive therapeutic candidate for lung cancer treatment. However, the lack of optimal bioavailability because of high toxicity, low stability, and poor solubility has limited their clinical success. Given this, an aerosolized nanoemulsion system for pulmonary delivery is recommended to mitigate these drawbacks. In this study, DTX- and CCM-loaded nanoemulsions were optimized using the D-optimal mixture experimental design (MED). The effect of nanoemulsion compositions towards two response variables, namely, particle size and aerosol size, was studied. The optimized formulations for both DTX- and CCM-loaded nanoemulsions were determined, and their physicochemical and aerodynamic properties were evaluated as well. The MED models achieved the optimum formulation for DTX- and CCM-loaded nanoemulsions containing a 6.0 wt% mixture of palm kernel oil ester (PKOE) and safflower seed oils (1:1), 2.5 wt% of lecithin, 2.0 wt% mixture of Tween 85 and Span 85 (9:1), and 2.5 wt% of glycerol in the aqueous phase. The actual values of the optimized formulations were in line with the predicted values obtained from the MED, and they exhibited desirable attributes of physicochemical and aerodynamic properties for inhalation therapy. Thus, the optimized formulations have potential use as a drug delivery system for a pulmonary application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Self-Assembly and Design of Polyfunctional Nanosystems)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Supramolecular Chirality in Azobenzene-Containing Polymer System: Traditional Postpolymerization Self-Assembly versus In Situ Supramolecular Self-Assembly Strategy

Abstract: Recently, the design of new supramolecular chiral materials has received a great deal of attention due to rapid developments in supramolecular chemistry and molecular self-assembly fields. Supramolecular chirality has been widely introduced into polymers containing photoresponsive azobenzene groups. On the one hand, supramolecular chiral structures of azobenzene-containing polymers (Azo-polymers) can be produced by nonsymmetric arrangement of azobenzene units through a noncovalent bond. On the other hand, the reversibility of the photoisomerization also enables control of the supramolecular organization of the azobenzene moieties within polymer structures. The construction of supramolecular chirality in Azo-polymeric self-assembled systems is very important for the further development of this field from both academic and practical points of view. Traditional methods for constructing supramolecular chirality in Azo-polymers mainly involve postpolymerization self-assembly strategy. The in situ supramolecular self-assembly strategy is a facile one pot method for the construction of well-defined supramolecular chirality during polymerization. In this review, supramolecular chirality of Azo-polymer systems constructed by traditional postpolymerization self-assembly and in situ supramolecular self-assembly strategies will be mainly discussed. Furthermore, we will also summarize the basic concepts, seminal studies, recent trends, and perspectives in the construction and applications of supramolecular chirality based on Azo-polymers with the hope to advance the development of supramolecular chiral chemistry.

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