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Special Issue "Selected Papers from International Conference on Plant Systems Biology and Biotechnology 2020"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Tsanko S. Gechev
Website
Guest Editor
Plovdiv University, Plovdiv, Bulgaria
Center of Plant Systems Biology and Biotechnology, Plovdiv, Bulgaria
Interests: abiotic stress; desiccation tolerance; drought; oxidative stress; resurrection plants
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Veselin Petrov

Guest Editor
Center of Plant Systems Biology and Biotechnology, Plovdiv, Bulgaria
Agricultural University, Plovdiv, Bulgaria
Interests: abiotic stress; gene expression; oxidative stress; plant biochemistry, programmed cell death

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to their inherent complexity, analyzing only certain aspects of organisms is often insufficient for elucidating status, functions, and behavior. Modern technologies provide the opportunity to use holistic omics approaches to study living objects at the system level.

Plant systems biology has revolutionized our view on how plants grow, develop, and respond to the environment. Nowadays, the use of high-throughput genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics technologies combined with bioinformatics analysis and mathematical modeling allows us to take an in-depth look into the most intimate molecular mechanisms that govern a plant’s life. Plant systems biology together with plant biotechnology now give us endless opportunities to not only study the biological processes in a complex manner but also improve our utilization of plants as important sources of food and valuable metabolites.

This Special Issue will publish selected papers from scientists who attended the International Conference on Plant Systems Biology and Biotechnology 2020 (ICPSBB 2020). We encourage the submission of experimental articles, but review articles are also possible. Contributions will be initially screened by the Editors for suitability/quality and then sent for peer review.

The deadline for submissions to the ICPSBB 2020 Special Issue is 31 July 2021.

Prof. Dr. Tsanko S. Gechev
Dr. Veselin Petrov
Guest Editor


Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • genomics;
  • abiotic and oxidative stress;
  • plant development;
  • plant biotechnology;
  • molecular biology;
  • evolutionary biology;
  • molecular breeding;
  • plant systems biology;
  • bioinformatics and computational modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Caffeic and Chlorogenic Acids Synergistically Activate Browning Program in Human Adipocytes: Implications of AMPK- and PPAR-Mediated Pathways
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(24), 9740; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21249740 - 21 Dec 2020
Abstract
Caffeic acid (CA) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) are phenolic compounds claimed to be responsible for the metabolic effects of coffee and tea consumption. Along with their structural similarities, they share common mechanisms such as activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. The [...] Read more.
Caffeic acid (CA) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) are phenolic compounds claimed to be responsible for the metabolic effects of coffee and tea consumption. Along with their structural similarities, they share common mechanisms such as activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-obesity potential of CA and CGA as co-treatment in human adipocytes. The molecular interactions of CA and CGA with key adipogenic transcription factors were simulated through an in silico molecular docking approach. The expression levels of white and brown adipocyte markers, as well as genes related to lipid metabolism, were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses. Mechanistically, the CA/CGA combination induced lipolysis, upregulated AMPK and browning gene expression and downregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) at both transcriptional and protein levels. The gene expression profiles of the CA/CGA-co-treated adipocytes strongly resembled brown-like signatures. Major pathways identified included the AMPK- and PPAR-related signaling pathways. Collectively, these findings indicated that CA/CGA co-stimulation exerted a browning-inducing potential superior to that of either compound used alone which merits implementation in obesity management. Further, the obtained data provide additional insights on how CA and CGA modify adipocyte function, differentiation and lipid metabolism. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analysis of ROS Network Genes in Extremophile Eukaryotes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(23), 9131; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21239131 - 30 Nov 2020
Abstract
The reactive oxygen species (ROS) gene network, consisting of both ROS-generating and detoxifying enzymes, adjusts ROS levels in response to various stimuli. We performed a cross-kingdom comparison of ROS gene networks to investigate how they have evolved across all Eukaryotes, including protists, fungi, [...] Read more.
The reactive oxygen species (ROS) gene network, consisting of both ROS-generating and detoxifying enzymes, adjusts ROS levels in response to various stimuli. We performed a cross-kingdom comparison of ROS gene networks to investigate how they have evolved across all Eukaryotes, including protists, fungi, plants and animals. We included the genomes of 16 extremotolerant Eukaryotes to gain insight into ROS gene evolution in organisms that experience extreme stress conditions. Our analysis focused on ROS genes found in all Eukaryotes (such as catalases, superoxide dismutases, glutathione reductases, peroxidases and glutathione peroxidase/peroxiredoxins) as well as those specific to certain groups, such as ascorbate peroxidases, dehydroascorbate/monodehydroascorbate reductases in plants and other photosynthetic organisms. ROS-producing NADPH oxidases (NOX) were found in most multicellular organisms, although several NOX-like genes were identified in unicellular or filamentous species. However, despite the extreme conditions experienced by extremophile species, we found no evidence for expansion of ROS-related gene families in these species compared to other Eukaryotes. Tardigrades and rotifers do show ROS gene expansions that could be related to their extreme lifestyles, although a high rate of lineage-specific horizontal gene transfer events, coupled with recent tetraploidy in rotifers, could explain this observation. This suggests that the basal Eukaryotic ROS scavenging systems are sufficient to maintain ROS homeostasis even under the most extreme conditions. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Integrated Proteomic and Metabolomic Profiling of Phytophthora cinnamomi Attack on Sweet Chestnut (Castanea sativa) Reveals Distinct Molecular Reprogramming Proximal to the Infection Site and Away from It
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(22), 8525; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21228525 - 12 Nov 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Phytophthora cinnamomi is one of the most invasive tree pathogens that devastates wild and cultivated forests. Due to its wide host range, knowledge of the infection process at the molecular level is lacking for most of its tree hosts. To expand the repertoire [...] Read more.
Phytophthora cinnamomi is one of the most invasive tree pathogens that devastates wild and cultivated forests. Due to its wide host range, knowledge of the infection process at the molecular level is lacking for most of its tree hosts. To expand the repertoire of studied Phytophthora–woody plant interactions and identify molecular mechanisms that can facilitate discovery of novel ways to control its spread and damaging effects, we focused on the interaction between P. cinnamomi and sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa), an economically important tree for the wood processing industry. By using a combination of proteomics, metabolomics, and targeted hormonal analysis, we mapped the effects of P. cinnamomi attack on stem tissues immediately bordering the infection site and away from it. P. cinnamomi led to a massive reprogramming of the chestnut proteome and accumulation of the stress-related hormones salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA), indicating that stem inoculation can be used as an easily accessible model system to identify novel molecular players in P. cinnamomi pathogenicity. Full article
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