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Special Issue "Advanced Fluorescent Probes for Structural and Functional Imaging of Biological Systems 2.0"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Biophysics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kiryl D. Piatkevich

Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to kindly invite you to contribute to the Special Issue "Advanced Molecular Probes for Structural and Functional Imaging of Biological Systems" of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (Impact Factor 4.556). The Special Issue will elucidate the engineering, validation, and application of cutting-edge molecular probes for functional and structural imaging, from cells to intact animals. Novel imaging modalities enabling greater utility of such probes, as well as new biological findings gleaned from experiments performed using these probes, are also within the scope of the Special Issue.

Research articles may present the design and development of novel fluorescent proteins and biosensors as well as biochemical, spectroscopic, structural, and biophysical studies that help elucidate the molecular mechanisms of fluorescence and the biosensing of such probes. Application articles should demonstrate the use of novel molecular probes in complex samples or present new imaging modalities that expand the application of currently available probes. Papers may also focus on addressing important biological questions using advanced molecular probes. In addition, the Special Issue will provide a forum for sharing and discussing perspectives on the development of the field in the next several years. Perspectives should present the authors’ opinions on important new directions in molecular probe design and application. Reviews can cover recent advances in the field of fluorescent proteins and biosensors, or novel or emerging class of fluorescent proteins or biosensors.

Dr. Kiryl D. Piatkevich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fluorescent proteins
  • Fluorescent biosensors
  • In vivo microscopy
  • Super-resolution microscopy
  • Protein engineering

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
FRCaMP, a Red Fluorescent Genetically Encoded Calcium Indicator Based on Calmodulin from Schizosaccharomyces Pombe Fungus
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(1), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22010111 - 24 Dec 2020
Abstract
Red fluorescent genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) have expanded the available pallet of colors used for the visualization of neuronal calcium activity in vivo. However, their calcium-binding domain is restricted by calmodulin from metazoans. In this study, we developed red GECI, called FRCaMP, [...] Read more.
Red fluorescent genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) have expanded the available pallet of colors used for the visualization of neuronal calcium activity in vivo. However, their calcium-binding domain is restricted by calmodulin from metazoans. In this study, we developed red GECI, called FRCaMP, using calmodulin (CaM) from Schizosaccharomyces pombe fungus as a calcium binding domain. Compared to the R-GECO1 indicator in vitro, the purified protein FRCaMP had similar spectral characteristics, brightness, and pH stability but a 1.3-fold lower ΔF/F calcium response and 2.6-fold tighter calcium affinity with Kd of 441 nM and 2.4–6.6-fold lower photostability. In the cytosol of cultured HeLa cells, FRCaMP visualized calcium transients with a ΔF/F dynamic range of 5.6, which was similar to that of R-GECO1. FRCaMP robustly visualized the spontaneous activity of neuronal cultures and had a similar ΔF/F dynamic range of 1.7 but 2.1-fold faster decay kinetics vs. NCaMP7. On electrically stimulated cultured neurons, FRCaMP demonstrated 1.8-fold faster decay kinetics and 1.7-fold lower ΔF/F values per one action potential of 0.23 compared to the NCaMP7 indicator. The fungus-originating CaM of the FRCaMP indicator version with a deleted M13-like peptide did not interact with the cytosolic environment of the HeLa cells in contrast to the metazoa-originating CaM of the similarly truncated version of the GCaMP6s indicator with a deleted M13-like peptide. Finally, we generated a split version of the FRCaMP indicator, which allowed the simultaneous detection of calcium transients and the heterodimerization of bJun/bFos interacting proteins in the nuclei of HeLa cells with a ΔF/F dynamic range of 9.4 and a contrast of 2.3–3.5, respectively. Full article
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