Special Issue "Internet and Smartphone Use-Related Addiction Health Problems: Treatment, Education and Research"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Olatz Lopez-Fernandez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Senior Lecturer, Turning Point, Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, 110 Church Street, Richmond VIC 3121, Australia
Interests: addictive behaviours; behavioural addictions; general online addictive behaviours (e.g., internet addiction; problem mobile phone use); specific online addictive behaviours (e.g., gaming, social networking, cybersex); gender issues (e.g., female, male); lifespan issues (e.g., children, elderly); educational technology (e.g., educative innovations; higher education; online learning and teaching; ePortfolios); e-health (e.g., healthcare practices for behavioural addictions, mhealth, serious games)
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The previous Special Issue "Internet and Mobile Phone Addiction: Health and Educational Effects" (2017-2018) was a successful achievement, which can be found at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/internet_addiction. The second edition relies on recent developments in internet and smartphone use-related addiction health problems.

The focus will be in its treatment, education and research, as the Special Issue will collect papers that will cover one (or more) of the health problems under study or under the clinical scope.

First, we invite studies on how these problems are being diagnosed, the profiling of these patients, the usual comorbidity, treatments applied, and their prognosis. Second, we want to know how these problems could be tackled from an educational and preventive perspective, if any policy options have been applied and the consequences, if any educational intervention is undertaken, even as a preventive action, or on how education has developed on these health problems. Third, any research focused on the role of the internet in different fixed or mobile technologies is expected. However, the primary interest is in empirical papers and reviews or new theoretical developments are welcome, even if they are focussed on not formally recognised behavioural addictions (i.e., cybersex, online shopping). Other behavioural addictions where the technology has a role which is not primarily the most important (e.g., food addiction, exercise addiction) will also be considered. Thus, contributions should offer new knowledge about how these health problems are evolving worldwide.

Dr. Olatz Lopez-Fernandez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Internet addiction
  • Mobile phone (or smartphone) addiction
  • Internet use-related addiction health problems: Gaming, disordered social networking, cybersex, emotional dependence, online shopping, etc.
  • Other behavioural addictions which use the technology as a complement: Food addiction, exercise addiction, work addiction, etc.
  • Diagnosis, dual pathology, comorbidity, treatments, psychotherapy, prognosis
  • Public health, eHealth, mHealth, etc.
  • Educational, intervention, prevention, psycho-sociological effects studies

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Social Exclusion, Surveillance Use, and Facebook Addiction: The Moderating Role of Narcissistic Grandiosity
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3813; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203813 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
One hundred and eighty-eight participants completed the online questionnaire with items on demographics (age and gender), social exclusion, surveillance use, Facebook addiction, and narcissistic grandiosity. The findings showed that social exclusion was positively associated with Facebook addiction (B = 0.237, p < 0.001) [...] Read more.
One hundred and eighty-eight participants completed the online questionnaire with items on demographics (age and gender), social exclusion, surveillance use, Facebook addiction, and narcissistic grandiosity. The findings showed that social exclusion was positively associated with Facebook addiction (B = 0.237, p < 0.001) and surveillance use was significantly positively associated with Facebook addiction (B = 0.211, p < 0.01). The surveillance use of Facebook was found to be a significant mediator between the risk of social exclusion on Facebook and Facebook addiction (B = 0.054, CI [0.20, 0.113]). Narcissistic grandiosity significantly moderated the associations between social exclusion and Facebook addiction (B = 0.079, p = 0.012). These findings suggest that the risk of social exclusion could serve as facilitator of Facebook addiction depending on narcissistic grandiosity. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Relationship between Self-Identity Confusion and Internet Addiction among College Students: The Mediating Effects of Psychological Inflexibility and Experiential Avoidance
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3225; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173225 - 03 Sep 2019
Abstract
Internet addiction (IA) has become a major public health problem among college students. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between self-identity confusion and IA and the mediating effects of psychological inflexibility and experiential avoidance (PI/EA) indicators in college students. [...] Read more.
Internet addiction (IA) has become a major public health problem among college students. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between self-identity confusion and IA and the mediating effects of psychological inflexibility and experiential avoidance (PI/EA) indicators in college students. A total of 500 college students (262 women and 238 men) were recruited. Their levels of self-identity were evaluated using the Self-Concept and Identity Measure. Their levels of PI/EA were examined using the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II. The severity of IA was assessed using the Chen Internet Addiction Scale. The relationships among self- identity, PI/EA, and IA were examined using structural equation modeling. The severity of self-identity confusion was positively associated with both the severity of PI/EA and the severity of IA. In addition, the severity of PI/EA indicators was positively associated with the severity of IA. These results demonstrated that the severity of self-identity confusion was related to the severity of IA, either directly or indirectly. The indirect relationship was mediated by the severity of PI/EA. Self-identity confusion and PI/EA should be taken into consideration by the community of professionals working on IA. Early detection and intervention of self-identity confusion and PI/EA should be the objectives for programs aiming to lower the risk of IA. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Associations Among Resilience, Stress, Depression, and Internet Gaming Disorder in Young Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3181; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173181 - 31 Aug 2019
Abstract
Background and Aims: Using gaming to escape emotional difficulty has been suggested to be a candidate mechanism contributing to Internet gaming disorder (IGD). This study evaluated the associations among resilience, perceived stress, depression, and IGD. Methods: A total of 87 participants [...] Read more.
Background and Aims: Using gaming to escape emotional difficulty has been suggested to be a candidate mechanism contributing to Internet gaming disorder (IGD). This study evaluated the associations among resilience, perceived stress, depression, and IGD. Methods: A total of 87 participants in an IGD group and 87 participants in a control group were recruited into this study. IGD was diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Stress levels, resilience, and depression were measured by a self-reported questionnaire. Results: The IGD group had a lower resilience, higher perceived stress, and depression than the control group. Hierarchical regression analysis demonstrated that resilience was associated with IGD when perceived stress was controlled. After depression was controlled, resilience and perceived stress were not associated with IGD. Among the IGD group, those with low resilience had higher depression. Furthermore, discipline was the resilience characteristic associated with IGD. Conclusions: Low resilience was associated with a higher risk of IGD. IGD individuals with low resilience had higher depression. Depression was more associated with IGD than resilience. Depression assessments and stress coping interventions should be provided for individuals with IGD who exhibit low resilience or high stress. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Development and Validation of the Parental Smartphone Use Management Scale (PSUMS): Parents’ Perceived Self-Efficacy with Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1423; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081423 - 21 Apr 2019
Abstract
The psychometric properties of the Parental Smartphone Use Management Scale (PSUMS) and its prospective relationships with symptoms of smartphone addiction and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were studies in a sample of parents of adolescents with ADHD. This is a scale to measure [...] Read more.
The psychometric properties of the Parental Smartphone Use Management Scale (PSUMS) and its prospective relationships with symptoms of smartphone addiction and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were studies in a sample of parents of adolescents with ADHD. This is a scale to measure parents’ perceived self-efficacy on managing their children’s smartphone use. Construct validity (exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis), criterion-related validity (known-group validity and concurrent validity), and reliability (Cronbach’s alpha) were performed for data analyses. The results showed that the PSUMS had good factorials validity and high reliabilities, with Cronbach’s alphas ranging between 0.93 and 0.95. The 17-item PSUMS accounted for 78.58% of the total variance and contains three theoretically and statistically appropriate subscales: reactive management, proactive management, and monitoring. Strong relationships were found between parental smartphone use management and symptoms of smartphone addiction and ADHD in expected directions. Moreover, parents of children with smartphone addiction yielded lower scores on all three PSUMS subscales than parents of children without smartphone addiction. The PSUMS is considered a valuable and reliable tool in the study of parental management on their adolescent children’s smartphone use, while providing us with important targets for intervention. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Addictive Features of Social Media/Messenger Platforms and Freemium Games against the Background of Psychological and Economic Theories
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2612; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142612 - 23 Jul 2019
Abstract
Currently about 2.71 billion humans use a smartphone worldwide. Although smartphone technology has brought many advances, a growing number of scientists discuss potential detrimental effects due to excessive smartphone use. Of importance, the likely culprit to understand over-usage is not the smartphone itself, [...] Read more.
Currently about 2.71 billion humans use a smartphone worldwide. Although smartphone technology has brought many advances, a growing number of scientists discuss potential detrimental effects due to excessive smartphone use. Of importance, the likely culprit to understand over-usage is not the smartphone itself, but the excessive use of applications installed on smartphones. As the current business model of many app-developers foresees an exchange of personal data for allowance to use an app, it is not surprising that many design elements can be found in social media apps and Freemium games prolonging app usage. It is the aim of the present work to analyze several prominent smartphone apps to carve out such elements. As a result of the analysis, a total of six different mechanisms are highlighted to illustrate the prevailing business model in smartphone app development. First, these app-elements are described and second linked to classic psychological/economic theories such as the mere-exposure effect, endowment effect, and Zeigarnik effect, but also to psychological mechanisms triggering social comparison. It is concluded that many of the here presented app-elements on smartphones are able to prolong usage time, but it is very hard to understand such an effect on the level of a single element. A systematic analysis would require insights into app data usually only being available for the app-designers, but not for independent scientists. Nevertheless, the present work supports the notion that it is time to critically reflect on the prevailing business model of ‘user data in exchange for app-use allowance’. Instead of using a service in exchange for data, it ultimately might be better to ban or regulate certain design elements in apps to come up with less addictive products. Instead, users could pay a reasonable fee for an app service. Full article

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Emerging Health and Education Issues Related to Internet Technologies
Author: Olatz Lopez-Fernandez
Affiliation: Turning Point, Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, 110 Church Street, Richmond VIC 3121, Australia
Back to TopTop