Next Article in Journal
Active School Transport among Children from Canada, Colombia, Finland, South Africa, and the United States: A Tale of Two Journeys
Next Article in Special Issue
Psychological Risk Factors that Predict Social Networking and Internet Addiction in Adolescents
Previous Article in Journal
Pedestrian Evacuation Risk Assessment of Subway Station under Large-Scale Sport Activity
Previous Article in Special Issue
Self-Perception of Dependence as an Indicator of Smartphone Addiction—Establishment of a Cutoff Point in the SPAI–Spain Inventory
Article

Stakeholders’ Consensus on Strategies for Self- and Other-Regulation of Video Game Play: A Mixed Methods Study

1
Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St. W5501, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
2
Carras Consulting, 1407 Scanlan Drive, Glen Burnie, MD 21205, USA
3
Departments of International Health, Epidemiology, and Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St. W5501, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3846; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113846
Received: 10 April 2020 / Revised: 22 May 2020 / Accepted: 25 May 2020 / Published: 28 May 2020
Background: Little is known about strategies or mechanics to improve self-regulation of video game play that could be developed into novel interventions. This study used a participatory approach with the gaming community to uncover insider knowledge about techniques to promote healthy play and prevent gaming disorder. Methods: We used a pragmatic approach to conduct a convergent-design mixed-methods study with participants attending a science fiction and education convention. Six participants answered questions about gaming engagement and self- or game-based regulation of gaming which were then categorized into pre-determined (a priori) themes by the presenters during the presentation. The categorized themes and examples from participant responses were presented back to participants for review and discussion. Seven participants ranked their top choices of themes for each question. The rankings were analyzed using a nonparametric approach to show consensus around specific themes. Results: Participants suggested several novel potential targets for preventive interventions including specific types of social (e.g., play with others in a group) or self-regulation processes (e.g., set timers or alarms). Suggestions for game mechanics that could help included clear break points and short missions, but loot boxes were not mentioned. Conclusions: Our consensus development approach produced many specific suggestions that could be implemented by game developers or tested as public health interventions, such as encouraging breaks through game mechanics, alarms or other limit setting; encouraging group gaming; and discussing and supporting setting appropriate time or activity goals around gaming (e.g., three quests, one hour). As some suggestions here have not been addressed previously as potential interventions, this suggests the importance of including gamers as stakeholders in research on the prevention of gaming disorder and the promotion of healthy gaming. A large-scale, online approach using these methods with multiple stakeholder groups could make effective use of players’ in-depth knowledge and help speed discovery and translation of possible preventive interventions into practice and policy. View Full-Text
Keywords: gaming disorder; prevention; video games; mixed methods research; stakeholder engagement; consensus development gaming disorder; prevention; video games; mixed methods research; stakeholder engagement; consensus development
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Colder Carras, M.; Carras, M.; Labrique, A.B. Stakeholders’ Consensus on Strategies for Self- and Other-Regulation of Video Game Play: A Mixed Methods Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3846. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113846

AMA Style

Colder Carras M, Carras M, Labrique AB. Stakeholders’ Consensus on Strategies for Self- and Other-Regulation of Video Game Play: A Mixed Methods Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(11):3846. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113846

Chicago/Turabian Style

Colder Carras, Michelle, Matthew Carras, and Alain B. Labrique 2020. "Stakeholders’ Consensus on Strategies for Self- and Other-Regulation of Video Game Play: A Mixed Methods Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 11: 3846. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113846

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop