Special Issue "Health Impact Assessment"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. David Rojas-Rueda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: environmental epidemiology; health impact assessment; burden of disease; urban health; climate change; air pollution; green spaces; built environment; active transportation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A Special Issue on Health Impact Assessment, in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, is being organized.

Health Impact Assessment (HIA) has been proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a key tool for health in all policies. In the last few decades, the practice of using Health Impact Assessments to influence public policies has been gaining in popularity throughout the world.

The WHO defines Health Impact Assessment as a combination of procedures, methods, and tools by which a policy, program, or project may be judged as to its potential effects on the health of a population, and the distribution of those effects within the population. Health Impact Assessment uses qualitative and/or quantitative methods (such as expert consultations, focus groups, comparative risk assessment, and burden of disease), and can be applied to multiple sectors (such as employment, social equity, environment, housing, and transportation).

For this Special Issue, we seek high-quality contributions on all types of Health Impact Assessments. We welcome contributions from all around the world on HIA applied to any sector, population, or geographical area. We also seek HIA reviews, methodological papers, evaluations, best practices, and critical analysis. We invite contributors from academia and the impact assessment practice, policy, and education arenas.

Prof. David Rojas-Rueda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health impact assessment (HIA)
  • qualitative HIA
  • quantitative HIA
  • rapid HIA
  • intermediate HIA
  • comprehensive HIA
  • participatory HIA
  • social HIA
  • environmental HIA
  • HIA and burden of disease
  • HIA and risk assessment
  • HIA and health risk assessment
  • HIA and health needs assessment
  • HIA and population risk assessment
  • HIA and comparative risk assessment
  • HIA and health impact modeling
  • urban HIA
  • rural HIA
  • HIA and non-communicable diseases
  • HIA and infection
  • HIA and equity
  • HIA and citizen science
  • HIA and health in all policies
  • HIA and sustainable development goals
  • HIA reviews
  • methods on HIA
  • HIA management
  • HIA tools
  • HIA best practices
  • HIA critical analysis
  • HIA evaluations
  • HIA training and education
  • HIA policy and legislation
  • HIA history

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Transport Policy Whose Injury Impacts May Go Unnoticed: More Walking, Cycling and Use of Public Transport
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3668; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193668 - 29 Sep 2019
Abstract
It is an objective of transport policy in many countries and cities to promote walking, cycling and the use of public transport. This policy seeks to improve public health and reduce emissions contributing to global warming. It is, however, very likely that more [...] Read more.
It is an objective of transport policy in many countries and cities to promote walking, cycling and the use of public transport. This policy seeks to improve public health and reduce emissions contributing to global warming. It is, however, very likely that more walking, cycling and use of public transport will be associated with an increase in traffic injury. Moreover, it is likely that most of this increase will go unnoticed and not be recorded in official road accident statistics. Official statistics on traffic injury are known to be very incomplete as far as injuries to pedestrians, cyclists and public transport passengers are concerned. This incompleteness is a problem when assessing health impacts of more walking, cycling and travel by public transport. In this paper, studies made in the city of Oslo, Norway (population 700,000) are used to develop numerical examples showing how the estimated real and recorded number of injuries may change when 10% of person km of travel performed by car are transferred to walking, cycling or public transport. It is shown that not more than about 2% of the estimated change in the actual number of injured road users will be recorded by official statistics on traffic injury. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Impact Assessment)
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Open AccessArticle
Health Effects of Energy Intensive Sectors and the Potential Health Co-Benefits of a Low Carbon Industrial Transition in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3022; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173022 - 21 Aug 2019
Abstract
Background: The issues of environmental pollution and its effects on health have become increasingly serious in China. Energy intensive sectors are not only the main energy consumers, but also the main sources of air pollution. Analyzing the health effects of energy intensive sectors [...] Read more.
Background: The issues of environmental pollution and its effects on health have become increasingly serious in China. Energy intensive sectors are not only the main energy consumers, but also the main sources of air pollution. Analyzing the health effects of energy intensive sectors and the potential health co-benefits of a low carbon industrial transition is of great importance for promoting China’s air pollution control. Methods: This study used the exposure-response (ER) relationship model and inhalation factor methods to quantitatively analyze the health effects of air pollution and forecast the potential health co-benefits in the power and steel sectors. Results: The results showed that in 2016 SO2 and PM2.5 emissions caused about 850,000 premature deaths, and 10 million cases of respiratory diseases and chest discomfort, resulting in health-related economic losses of 1.2 trillion Yuan, accounting for 1.6% of the GDP. Meanwhile, demand control in consumption could significantly reduce SO2 emissions in the power and steel sectors, thus offering significant health co-benefits. However, there was still some uncertainty regarding the reduction of PM2.5 emissions in the steel sector. Conclusions: There is a need to take advantage of the health co-benefits of emission reduction in energy intensive sectors and to adopt flexible means to stimulate their green transformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Impact Assessment)
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