Next Article in Journal
Toward an Integrated Model for Soft-Mobility
Previous Article in Journal
Altered Body Composition of Psoas and Thigh Muscles in Relation to Frailty and Severity of Parkinson’s Disease
Previous Article in Special Issue
Health Effects of Energy Intensive Sectors and the Potential Health Co-Benefits of a Low Carbon Industrial Transition in China
Open AccessArticle

A Transport Policy Whose Injury Impacts May Go Unnoticed: More Walking, Cycling and Use of Public Transport

Institute of Transport Economics, Gaustadalleen 21, 0349 Oslo, Norway
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3668; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193668
Received: 15 September 2019 / Revised: 26 September 2019 / Accepted: 26 September 2019 / Published: 29 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Impact Assessment)
It is an objective of transport policy in many countries and cities to promote walking, cycling and the use of public transport. This policy seeks to improve public health and reduce emissions contributing to global warming. It is, however, very likely that more walking, cycling and use of public transport will be associated with an increase in traffic injury. Moreover, it is likely that most of this increase will go unnoticed and not be recorded in official road accident statistics. Official statistics on traffic injury are known to be very incomplete as far as injuries to pedestrians, cyclists and public transport passengers are concerned. This incompleteness is a problem when assessing health impacts of more walking, cycling and travel by public transport. In this paper, studies made in the city of Oslo, Norway (population 700,000) are used to develop numerical examples showing how the estimated real and recorded number of injuries may change when 10% of person km of travel performed by car are transferred to walking, cycling or public transport. It is shown that not more than about 2% of the estimated change in the actual number of injured road users will be recorded by official statistics on traffic injury. View Full-Text
Keywords: injury; reporting; modal split; transport policy injury; reporting; modal split; transport policy
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Elvik, R. A Transport Policy Whose Injury Impacts May Go Unnoticed: More Walking, Cycling and Use of Public Transport. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3668.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop