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Open AccessArticle

Measuring Burden of Disease Attributable to Air Pollution Due to Preterm Birth Complications and Infant Death in Paris Using Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs)

1
EHESP School of Public Health, Rennes Campus, CEDEX 35043 Rennes, France
2
Department of Social Epidemiology, INSERM, Institut Pierre Louis d’Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique (UMRS 1136), Sorbonne Universités, UPMC University Paris 06, 75012 Paris, France
3
LIVE UMR 7362 CNRS (Laboratoire Image Ville Environnement), University of Strasbourg, 6700 Strasbourg, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7841; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217841
Received: 3 July 2020 / Revised: 8 October 2020 / Accepted: 13 October 2020 / Published: 26 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Impact Assessment)
Several studies have found maternal exposure to particulate matter pollution was associated with adverse birth outcomes, including infant mortality and preterm birth. In this context, our study aims to quantify the air pollution burden of disease due to preterm birth complications and infant death in Paris, with particular attention to people living in the most deprived census blocks. Data on infant death and preterm birth was available from the birth and death certificates. The postal address of mother’s newborn was converted in census block number. A socioeconomic deprivation index was built at the census block level. Average annual ambient concentrations of PM10 were modelled at census block level using the ESMERALDA atmospheric modelling system. The number of infant deaths attributed to PM10 exposure is expressed in years of life lost. We used a three-step compartmental model to appraise neurodevelopmental impairment among survivors of preterm birth. We estimated that 12.8 infant deaths per 100,000 live births may be attributable to PM10 exposure, and about one third of these infants lived in deprived census blocks. In addition, we found that approximately 4.8% of preterm births could be attributable to PM10 exposure, and approximately 1.9% of these infants died (corresponding to about 5.75 deaths per 100,000 live birth). Quantification of environmental hazard-related health impacts for children at local level is essential to prioritizing interventions. Our study suggests that additional effort is needed to reduce the risk of complications and deaths related to air pollution exposure, especially among preterm births. Because of widespread exposure to air pollution, significant health benefits could be achieved through regulatory interventions aimed at reducing exposure of the population as a whole, and particularly of the most vulnerable, such as children and pregnant women. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental burden of disease; years life lost; disability-adjusted life years; air pollution; adverse birth outcome environmental burden of disease; years life lost; disability-adjusted life years; air pollution; adverse birth outcome
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Deguen, S.; Marchetta, G.P.; Kihal-Talantikite, W. Measuring Burden of Disease Attributable to Air Pollution Due to Preterm Birth Complications and Infant Death in Paris Using Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7841.

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