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Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2017) | Viewed by 45634

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Patient safety, satisfaction and good quality of care are considered to be a right for all patients and the responsibility of all staff within hospitals (Zineldin, 2006).

Human error is almost unavoidable, even for the most experienced, trained and qualified physicians and other health-care providers. Medical errors (MEs) are one of the leading causes of death and injury in many countries.

More people die and are injured as a result of MEs than as a result of AIDS, breast cancer or car accidents. In all, 23 percent of Europeans argue that they have been directly affected by a ME, personally, or in the family. In all, 18 percent indicate that they or their family members have experienced a serious ME in a hospital, whereas 11 percent have announced having been prescribed the wrong medication (European Commission, 2006). In Sweden, over 3000 people die each year as a result of MEs and adverse events. In Canada (2004) 185,000 were associated with an adverse event, 70,000 were potentially preventable.

Many studies have found that poor medical care, or even if providers treat patients rudely, dissatisfies patients, discourages them from seeking care, and returning for services, and prompts them to switch physicians. Health-care staff members derive greater personal and professional satisfaction from their jobs when they can offer good-quality care and feel their work is valuable. Some studies argue that the most satisfying aspect of physicians’ jobs is helping people, and the community recognition they received for it.

Systematic methods of patient safety, quality assurance and patient satisfaction are still evolving, in both developed and developing countries. The medical and health-care sectors have to cope with environmental pressures, such as demographic changes and ageing of populations, as well as the emergence of new treatments and technologies, and increased insistence on greater medical and health care in order to remain competitive. This Special Issue reflects an effort to capture current developments in the healthcare quality and patient satisfaction field, and to provide a forum for cutting-edge contributions to the literature.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Best Practices in Clinical and Operational Processes

  • Post-operative care and patient satisfaction after critical surgeries

  • Patient Satisfaction: recent Indicator for the Quality of Primary Care

  • Relationship of Patient Satisfaction with Care and Clinical Outcomes.

  • Illness Behavior and Patent satisfaction

  • Methods to reduce medical errors and increase patient satisfaction

  • Measurement of patient safety and satisfaction

  • Patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life

  • Key factors affecting quality of life in patients with chronical illnesses

  • The Care Act and Standards and Patient Satisfaction in Hospitals

  • Self-efficacy and patient satisfaction

  • Physician and patient satisfaction

Prof. Dr. Mosad Zineldin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Quality Improvement

  • Patient satisfaction

  • Safety

  • Performance

  • IT 5Qs model

  • Innovation

  • e-health

  • Sustaining Improvement

  • Medical errors

  • Clinical practice guidelines

Published Papers (8 papers)

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17 pages, 4121 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Health-Care Risk: The Clinical-VaR, a Key Indicator for Sound Management
by Enrique Jiménez-Rodríguez, José Manuel Feria-Domínguez and Alonso Sebastián-Lacave
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 639; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040639 - 30 Mar 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 5026
Abstract
Clinical risk includes any undesirable situation or operational factor that may have negative consequences for patient safety or capable of causing an adverse event (AE). The AE, intentional or unintentionally, may be related to the human factor, that is, medical errors (MEs). Therefore, [...] Read more.
Clinical risk includes any undesirable situation or operational factor that may have negative consequences for patient safety or capable of causing an adverse event (AE). The AE, intentional or unintentionally, may be related to the human factor, that is, medical errors (MEs). Therefore, the importance of the health-care risk management is a current and relevant issue on the agenda of many public and private institutions. The objective of the management has been evolving from the identification of AE to the assessment of cost-effective and efficient measures that improve the quality control through monitoring. Consequently, the goal of this paper is to propose a Key Risk Indicator (KRI) that enhances the advancement of the health-care management system. Thus, the application of the Value at Risk (VaR) concept in combination to the Loss Distribution Approach (LDA) is proved to be a proactive tool, within the frame of balanced scorecard (BSC), in health organizations. For this purpose, the historical events recorded in the Algo-OpData® database (Algorithmics Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) have been used. The analysis highlights the importance of risk in the financials outcomes of the sector. The results of paper show the usefulness of the Clinical-VaR to identify and monitor the risk and sustainability of the implemented controls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
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10 pages, 279 KiB  
Article
Crisis Resource Management in the Delivery Room: Development of Behavioral Markers for Team Performance in Emergency Simulation
by Fabrizio Bracco, Gabriele De Tonetti, Michele Masini, Marcello Passarelli, Francesca Geretto and Danilo Celleno
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 439; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030439 - 03 Mar 2018
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4732
Abstract
Human factors are the most relevant issues contributing to adverse events in obstetrics. Specific training of Crisis Resource Management (CRM) skills (i.e., problem solving and team management, resource allocation, awareness of environment, and dynamic decision-making) is now widespread and is often based on [...] Read more.
Human factors are the most relevant issues contributing to adverse events in obstetrics. Specific training of Crisis Resource Management (CRM) skills (i.e., problem solving and team management, resource allocation, awareness of environment, and dynamic decision-making) is now widespread and is often based on High Fidelity Simulation. In order to be used as a guideline in simulated scenarios, CRM skills need to be mapped to specific and observable behavioral markers. For this purpose, we developed a set of observable behaviors related to the main elements of CRM in the delivery room. The observational tool was then adopted in a two-days seminar on obstetric hemorrhage where teams working in obstetric wards of six Italian hospitals took part in simulations. The tool was used as a guide for the debriefing and as a peer-to-peer feedback. It was then rated for its usefulness in facilitating the reflection upon one’s own behavior, its ease of use, and its usefulness for the peer-to-peer feedback. The ratings were positive, with a median of 4 on a 5-point scale. The CRM observational tool has therefore been well-received and presents a promising level of inter-rater agreement. We believe the tool could have value in facilitating debriefing and in the peer-to-peer feedback. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
13 pages, 291 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Supportive and Ethical Work Environments on Work-Related Accidents, Injuries, and Serious Psychological Distress among Hospital Nurses
by Maki Tei-Tominaga and Miharu Nakanishi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020240 - 31 Jan 2018
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 5966
Abstract
The healthcare industry in Japan has experienced many cases of work-related injuries, accidents, and workers’ compensation claims because of mental illness. This study examined the influence of supportive and ethical work environments on work-related accidents, injuries, and serious psychological distress among hospital nurses. [...] Read more.
The healthcare industry in Japan has experienced many cases of work-related injuries, accidents, and workers’ compensation claims because of mental illness. This study examined the influence of supportive and ethical work environments on work-related accidents, injuries, and serious psychological distress among hospital nurses. Self-reported questionnaires were distributed to nurses (n = 1114) from 11 hospitals. Valid responses (n = 822, 93% women, mean age = 38.49 ± 10.09 years) were used for analyses. The questionnaire included items addressing basic attributes, work and organizational characteristics, social capital and ethical climate at the workplace, psychological distress, and experience of work-related accidents or injuries in the last half year. The final model of a multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that those who work less than 4 h of overtime per week (OR = 0.313), those who work on days off more than once per month (OR = 0.424), and an exclusive workplace climate (OR = 1.314) were significantly associated with work-related accidents or injuries. Additionally, an exclusive workplace climate (OR = 1.696) elevated the risk of serious psychological distress. To prevent work-related compensation cases, which are caused by these variables, strengthening hospitals’ occupational health and safety is necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
31 pages, 744 KiB  
Article
Patient Satisfaction with Pre-Hospital Emergency Services. A Qualitative Study Comparing Professionals’ and Patients’ Views
by Fernando García-Alfranca, Anna Puig, Carles Galup, Hortensia Aguado, Ismael Cerdá, Mercedes Guilabert, Virtudes Pérez-Jover, Irene Carrillo and José Joaquín Mira
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020233 - 30 Jan 2018
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 7484
Abstract
Objective: To describe patient satisfaction with pre-hospital emergency knowledge and determine if patients and professionals share a common vision on the satisfaction predictors. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in two phases. First, a systematic review following the PRISMA protocol was carried [...] Read more.
Objective: To describe patient satisfaction with pre-hospital emergency knowledge and determine if patients and professionals share a common vision on the satisfaction predictors. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in two phases. First, a systematic review following the PRISMA protocol was carried out searching publications between January 2000 and July 2016 in Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane. Second, three focus groups involving professionals (advisers and healthcare providers) and a total of 79 semi-structured interviews involving patients were conducted to obtain information about what dimensions of care were a priority for patients. Results: Thirty-three relevant studies were identified, with a majority conducted in Europe using questionnaires. They pointed out a very high level of satisfaction of callers and patients. Delay with the assistance and the ability for resolution of the case are the elements that overlap in fostering satisfaction. The published studies reviewed with satisfaction neither the overall care process nor related the measurement of the real time in responding to an emergency. The patients and professionals concurred in their assessments about the most relevant elements for patient satisfaction, although safety was not a predictive factor for patients. Response capacity and perceived capacity for resolving the situation were crucial factors for satisfaction. Conclusions: Published studies have assessed similar dimensions of satisfaction and have shown high patient satisfaction. Expanded services resolving a wide number of issues that can concern citizens are also positively assessed. Delays and resolution capacity are crucial for satisfaction. Furthermore, despite the fact that few explanations may be given due to a lack of face-to-face attention, finding the patient’s location, taking into account the caller’s emotional needs, and maintaining phone contact until the emergency services arrive are high predictors of satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
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654 KiB  
Article
Impact of Interprofessional Relationships from Nurses’ Perspective on the Decision-Making Capacity of Patients in a Clinical Setting
by Jesús Molina-Mula, Julia Gallo-Estrada and Catalina Perelló-Campaner
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010049 - 29 Dec 2017
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 6623
Abstract
Interprofessional relationships may impact the decision making of patients in a clinical setting. The objective of this study was to analyse the decision-making capabilities of patients from nurses’ perspectives of interprofessional relationships using Foucauldian ethics. This qualitative study was based on poststructuralist Foucault [...] Read more.
Interprofessional relationships may impact the decision making of patients in a clinical setting. The objective of this study was to analyse the decision-making capabilities of patients from nurses’ perspectives of interprofessional relationships using Foucauldian ethics. This qualitative study was based on poststructuralist Foucault references with in-depth interviews of nurses working in internal medicine and specialties in a general hospital. The patients constantly appeared in the definition of teamwork, but also as a passive element used by every professional to communicate with others. Nurses continue modelling a type of patient passivity, or what Foucault called passive subjectivity in relation to oneself, because the patient is guided and directed to take charge of a truth provided by professionals. Nurses must break the rigid design of sections or professional skills, and adopt a model of teamwork that meets the needs of the patient and increases their decision-making power. The quality of care will increase to the extent that professionals establish a relationship of equality with the patient, allowing the patient to make real decisions about their care. An egalitarian model of teamwork is beneficial to the patient, abandoning the idea of a team where the patient and family are constantly excluded from decisions about their care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
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317 KiB  
Article
New Instrument to Measure Hospital Patient Experiences in Flanders
by Luk Bruyneel, Else Tambuyzer, Ellen Coeckelberghs, Dirk De Wachter, Walter Sermeus, Dirk De Ridder, Dirk Ramaekers, Ilse Weeghmans and Kris Vanhaecht
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1319; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111319 - 30 Oct 2017
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5199
Abstract
Implementing a standardized patient experience survey may initiate a process to apply pressure on hospitals to attend to improving patient experiences. In Flanders, Belgium, the Flemish Patient Survey was developed between 2011 and 2015. A preliminary version was developed from a scoping review [...] Read more.
Implementing a standardized patient experience survey may initiate a process to apply pressure on hospitals to attend to improving patient experiences. In Flanders, Belgium, the Flemish Patient Survey was developed between 2011 and 2015. A preliminary version was developed from a scoping review and patient and expert focus groups, and included 27 items for eight hypothesized dimensions: ‘preparing for hospital stay’, ‘information and communication’, ‘coordination’, ‘respect’, ‘privacy’, ‘safe care’, pain management’, and ‘participation’. Exploratory factor analysis for 1076 patients in 17 hospitals found that the data did not fit the dimensions. Adaptations in item wording and response categories were based on the US Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. The revised version showed excellent model fit in 22,143 patients in 37 hospitals. Multiple group analysis pointed to evidence of measurement invariance over time across mode of administration, type of nursing unit, and various patient characteristics. Fostering a collaborative approach thus proved successful in implementing a standardized patient experience survey. The most recent findings (2016) illustrate substandard performance and a need for patient-mix adjustment. The Flemish government developed a dedicated website to make findings publicly available and the federal government currently considers patient experiences in devising a pay-for-quality scheme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
499 KiB  
Article
Job Satisfaction among Health-Care Staff in Township Health Centers in Rural China: Results from a Latent Class Analysis
by Haipeng Wang, Chengxiang Tang, Shichao Zhao, Qingyue Meng and Xiaoyun Liu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1101; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101101 - 22 Sep 2017
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 4889
Abstract
Background: The lower job satisfaction of health-care staff will lead to more brain drain, worse work performance, and poorer health-care outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of job satisfaction among health-care staff in rural China, and to investigate [...] Read more.
Background: The lower job satisfaction of health-care staff will lead to more brain drain, worse work performance, and poorer health-care outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of job satisfaction among health-care staff in rural China, and to investigate the association between the latent clusters and health-care staff’s personal and professional features; Methods: We selected 12 items of five-point Likert scale questions to measure job satisfaction. A latent-class analysis was performed to identify subgroups based on the items of job satisfaction; Results: Four latent classes of job satisfaction were identified: 8.9% had high job satisfaction, belonging to “satisfied class”; 38.2% had low job satisfaction, named as “unsatisfied class”; 30.5% were categorized into “unsatisfied class with the exception of interpersonal relationships”; 22.4% were identified as “pseudo-satisfied class”, only satisfied with management-oriented items. Low job satisfaction was associated with specialty, training opportunity, and income inequality. Conclusions: The minority of health-care staff belong to the “satisfied class”. Three among four subgroups are not satisfied with income, benefit, training, and career development. Targeting policy interventions should be implemented to improve the items of job satisfaction based on the patterns and health-care staff’s features. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
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14 pages, 323 KiB  
Protocol
Feasibility of Integrating Residential Care Pharmacists into Aged Care Homes to Improve Quality Use of Medicines: Study Protocol for a Non-Randomised Controlled Pilot Trial
by Nicole McDerby, Mark Naunton, Alison Shield, Kasia Bail and Sam Kosari
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 499; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030499 - 12 Mar 2018
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4892
Abstract
Older adults are particularly susceptible to iatrogenic disease and communicable diseases, such as influenza. Prescribing in the residential aged care population is complex, and requires ongoing review to prevent medication misadventure. Pharmacist-led medication review is effective in reducing medication-related problems; however, current funding [...] Read more.
Older adults are particularly susceptible to iatrogenic disease and communicable diseases, such as influenza. Prescribing in the residential aged care population is complex, and requires ongoing review to prevent medication misadventure. Pharmacist-led medication review is effective in reducing medication-related problems; however, current funding arrangements specifically exclude pharmacists from routinely participating in resident care. Integrating an on-site clinical pharmacist into residential care teams is an unexplored opportunity to improve quality use of medicines in this setting. The primary objective of this pilot study is to investigate the feasibility of integrating a residential care pharmacist into the existing care team. Secondary outcomes include incidence of pharmacist-led medication review, and incidence of potential medication problems based on validated prescribing measures. This is a cross-sectional, non-randomised controlled trial with a residential care pharmacist trialled at a single facility, and a parallel control site receiving usual care and services only. The results of this hypothesis-generating pilot study will be used to identify clinical outcomes and direct future larger scale investigations into the implementation of the novel residential care pharmacist model to optimise quality use of medicines in a population at high risk of medication misadventure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
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