Topical Collection "Feature Papers of Hydrology"

Editors

Prof. Dr. Ezio Todini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Honorary President of Italian Hydrological Society, Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, 40126 Bologna, Italy
Interests: hydrological modeling; real-time flood forecasting; predictive uncertainty assessment; Kalman filters; Bayesian statistics and decision; water resources management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Tammo Steenhuis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
Interests: watershed management; catchment processes; agricultural water management erosion; best management practices; groundwater quality; vadose zone transport; preferential flow
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Journals dedicated to hydrology mainly publish papers dealing with scientific aspects of hydrological processes and water management. Rarely do manuscripts appear that involve the three basic actors concerned with hydrology: academicians, professionals, and decision-makers in governmental, regional, and local agencies implementing civil and environmental projects.

In this Special Issue, we look forward to receiving contributions on water management and hydrological applications in a real-world setting with the ultimate goal of improving socioeconomic and eco-environmental benefits for the people that the project is serving. Primarily, in this Special Issue, we would like to host experts’ views and opinion papers on improving hydrology research as well as decision-making processes by benefitting from the mutual interaction of academicians, professionals, and decision-makers and what must be done to understand each other better. Finally, we encourage the submission of manuscripts of professional hydrologists involved in the field and the operation sector describing their experience of cooperation with academicians and their views on how academic research, communication, and information exchanges can be improved.

Prof. Ezio Todini
Prof. Dr. Tammo Steenhuis


Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hydrology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • research and decision making in hydrology
  • a common language
  • a common understanding
  • benefits from using scientific results in decision making
  • benefits from hydrological practices in finding appropriate new research themes

Published Papers (5 papers)

2022

Jump to: 2021

Opinion
Eutopian and Dystopian Water Resource Systems Design and Operation—Three Irish Case Studies
Hydrology 2022, 9(9), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology9090159 - 06 Sep 2022
Viewed by 503
Abstract
The Harvard Water Program is more than sixty years old. It was directed by an academic Steering Committee consisting of the professors of Government and Political Science, Planning, Economics, and Water Engineering. In 2022 we would add to the notional Steering Committee the [...] Read more.
The Harvard Water Program is more than sixty years old. It was directed by an academic Steering Committee consisting of the professors of Government and Political Science, Planning, Economics, and Water Engineering. In 2022 we would add to the notional Steering Committee the professors of Ecology, Sociology and Water Law, calling it the augmented Harvard eutopian approach to the design and operation of Water Resource Systems. We use the Greek word ‘eu-topos’ to mean ‘a good place’, figuratively speaking, and ‘dys-topos’ its antonym, ‘not a good place’. By opposing eutopia and dystopia (latin forms) (Utopian literature begins with Thomas More’s (1478–1535) fictional socio-political satire “Utopia”, written in Latin and published in 1516: “Libellus vere aureus, nec minus salutaris quam festivus, de optimo rei publicae statu deque nova insula Utopia”. “A little, true book, not less beneficial than enjoyable, about how things should be in a state and about the new island Utopia” [Wikipedia translation]. He coined the word ‘utopia’ from the Greek ou-topos meaning ‘no place’ or ‘nowhere’. It was a pun-the almost identical Greek word eu-topos means ‘a good place’), we pass judgement on three Irish case studies, in whole and in part. The first case study deals with the dystopian measurement of the land phase of the hydrological cycle. The system components are distributed among many government departments that see little need to cooperate, leading to proposition 1: A call for a new Water Law. The second case study deals with a project to restore a 200 km2 polder landscape to its condition in 1957. The project came to the University with an hypothetical cause of the increased flooding and a tentative solution: dredge the Cashen estuary of its sand, speeding the flow of sluiced water to the sea, and the status quo ante would be restored. The first scientific innovation was the proof that restoration by dredging is impossible. Pumping is the only solution, but it raises disruptive questions that are not covered by Statute. The second important innovation was the discovery in the dynamic water balance, of large leakage into the polders, either around or between sluiced culverts, when the flap valves are nominally closed, impacting both their maintenance and minimization of pumping. Discussions on our findings ended in dystopian silence. Hence proposition 2: Moving towards eutopia may only be possible with a change in the Law. The third case study concerns the protection of Cork City from flooding: riverine, tidal and groundwater. The government’s “emerging solution” consists of major physical intervention in the city centre, driven hard against local opposition, as the only possible solution. Two hydro-electric reservoirs upstream were largely ignored as part of a solution because the relevant Statute did not mandate their use for flood control. The Supreme Court has recently overturned this interpretation of the governing Statute. A new theory of flood control with a cascade of reservoirs, dams and weirs is the scientific innovation here. Once more these findings have been greeted by government with dystopian silence. Hence proposition 3: Re-open the design process to find several much better solutions, approximating a eutopian water world. Full article
Article
Towards Informed Water Resources Planning and Management
Hydrology 2022, 9(8), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology9080136 - 30 Jul 2022
Viewed by 731
Abstract
In Water Resources Planning and Management, decision makers, although unsure of future outcomes, must take the most reliable and assuring decisions. Deterministic and probabilistic prediction techniques, combined with optimization tools, have been widely used to meet the objective of improving planning as well [...] Read more.
In Water Resources Planning and Management, decision makers, although unsure of future outcomes, must take the most reliable and assuring decisions. Deterministic and probabilistic prediction techniques, combined with optimization tools, have been widely used to meet the objective of improving planning as well as management. Bayesian decision approaches are available to link probabilistic predictions to optimized decision schemes, but scientists are not fully able to express themselves in a language familiar to decision makers, who fear basing their decisions on “uncertain” forecasts in the vain belief that deterministic forecasts are more informative and reliable. This situation is even worse in the case of climate change projections, which bring additional degrees of uncertainty into the picture. Therefore, a need emerges to create a common approach and means of communication between scientists, who deal with optimization tools, probabilistic predictions and long-term projections, and operational decision makers, who must be facilitated in understanding, accepting, and acknowledging the benefits arising from operational water resources management based on probabilistic predictions and projections. Our aim here was to formulate the terms of the problem and the rationale for explaining and involving decision makers with the final objective of using probabilistic predictions/projections in their decision-making processes. Full article
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Article
Climate Extrapolations in Hydrology: The Expanded Bluecat Methodology
Hydrology 2022, 9(5), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology9050086 - 12 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1855
Abstract
Bluecat is a recently proposed methodology to upgrade a deterministic model (D-model) into a stochastic one (S-model), based on the hypothesis that the information contained in a time series of observations and the concurrent predictions made by the D-model is sufficient to support [...] Read more.
Bluecat is a recently proposed methodology to upgrade a deterministic model (D-model) into a stochastic one (S-model), based on the hypothesis that the information contained in a time series of observations and the concurrent predictions made by the D-model is sufficient to support this upgrade. The prominent characteristics of the methodology are its simplicity and transparency, which allow its easy use in practical applications, without sophisticated computational means. In this paper, we utilize the Bluecat methodology and expand it in order to be combined with climate model outputs, which often require extrapolation out of the range of values covered by observations. We apply the expanded methodology to the precipitation and temperature processes in a large area, namely the entire territory of Italy. The results showcase the appropriateness of the method for hydroclimatic studies, as regards the assessment of the performance of the climate projections, as well as their stochastic conversion with simultaneous bias correction and uncertainty quantification. Full article
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Opinion
Effective Transfer of Science to Operations in Hydrometeorology Considering Uncertainty
Hydrology 2022, 9(4), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology9040055 - 27 Mar 2022
Viewed by 779
Abstract
The ability to effectively transfer results of research in hydrometeorology to operational field applications is met with several challenges. This article exemplifies cooperative implementation that explicitly considers the flow of uncertainty from data and models to products and predictions as a means to [...] Read more.
The ability to effectively transfer results of research in hydrometeorology to operational field applications is met with several challenges. This article exemplifies cooperative implementation that explicitly considers the flow of uncertainty from data and models to products and predictions as a means to successfully meet these challenges. Full article
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2021

Jump to: 2022

Opinion
Science Informed Policies for Managing Water
Hydrology 2021, 8(2), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8020066 - 15 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1146
Abstract
Water resource management policies impact how water supplies are protected, collected, stored, treated, distributed, and allocated among multiple users and purposes. Water resource policies influence the decisions made regarding the siting, design, and operation of infrastructure needed to achieve the underlying goals of [...] Read more.
Water resource management policies impact how water supplies are protected, collected, stored, treated, distributed, and allocated among multiple users and purposes. Water resource policies influence the decisions made regarding the siting, design, and operation of infrastructure needed to achieve the underlying goals of these policies. Water management policies vary by region depending on particular hydrologic, economic, environmental, and social conditions, but in all cases they will have multiple impacts affecting these conditions. Science can provide estimates of various economic, ecologic, environmental, and even social impacts of alternative policies, impacts that determine how effective any particular policy may be. These impact estimates can be used to compare and evaluate alternative policies in the search for identifying the best ones to implement. Among all scientists providing inputs to policy making processes are analysts who develop and apply models that provide these estimated impacts and, possibly, their probabilities of occurrence. However, just producing them is not a guarantee that they will be considered by policy makers. This paper reviews various aspects of the science-policy interface and factors that can influence what information policy makers need from scientists. This paper suggests some ways scientists and analysts can contribute to and inform those making water management policy decisions. Brief descriptions of some water management policy making examples illustrate some successes and failures of science informing and influencing policy. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Practice and technical application of hydrological monitoring and forecasting & early warning in China
Authors: Zhiyu Liu 1,2; Yiwen Zhang
Affiliation: 1 Hydrology Montior and Forecast Center, Ministry of Water Resources of China, Beijing 100053; [email protected] ; [email protected] 2 Hohai University, Nanjing 210098; [email protected] * Correspondence: [email protected]; Tel.: (+86-10-63204513)
Abstract: China is one of the countries in the world with frequent and serious flood and drought disasters. Since 1949, China has carried out large-scale construction of water conservancy projects and continuous harnessing of major rivers such as the Yangtze River, the Yellow River and other large rivers. Starting in the 1980s, especially after the 1998 Yangtze River Great Flood, China has continued to invest in and accelerate the construction of flood control and drought relief projects, while strengthened non-engineering measures such as hydrologogical monitoring, forecasting and early warning. To date, China has built an overall and powerful hydrologic monitoring system supported by hydrologic stations network, shaping a hydrological forecasting operational system consisting of a hierarchy of hydrologic management, flood forecast, joint consultation, and results-sharing. As the result, hydrological early warning can cover five adminstrative levels ranging from the central government to river basin water resources commission, provincial hydrological department, regional hydrological information center and county-level hydrological unit. The more complete and powerful hydrological monitoring and forecasting early warning system produces significant benefits in disaster prevention and mitigation, contributing to the decision-making for national flood and drought control purposes. This paper provides a brief on the general situation of flood disasters in China and new ideas in disaster prevention and reduction, reviews and summarizes the main measures, technical methods and latest progresses in hydrological monitoring and forecasting & early warning, and introduces exemplary cases of critical hydrological forecasting that successfully helped flood control and disaster reduction decision-making such as flood dispatch, emergency disposal, rescue and rescue in historical major floods. Finally, this paper probes into existing issues and challenges in flood prediction and forecasting nowadays, and puts forward several key tasks as a mark for future development direction and sectors to be strengthened

Title: Bluecat: Easy conversion of deterministic hydrological predictions to stochastic, and related benefits to decision makers and the society.
Authors: Alberto Montanari; Demetris Koutsoyiannis
Affiliation: Department of Water Resources, School of Civil Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece

Title: Towards Informed Water Resources Planning and Management
Authors: Paolo Reggiani 1; Amal Talbi 2; Ezio Todini 3,*
Affiliation: 1 University of Siegen; [email protected] 2 The World Bank; [email protected] 3 Italian Hydrological Society; [email protected] * Correspondence: [email protected]
Abstract: Abstract: In Water Resources Planning and Management decision makers, although uncertain of future outcomes, must take the most reliable and assuring decision. Deterministic and probabilistic prediction techniques combined with optimization tools have been widely used to meet the objective of improving planning as well as management. Bayesian decision approaches are available to link probabilistic predictions to optimized decision schemes, but scientists are not fully able of speaking the language of decision makers who fear to base their decisions in the mistaken belief that deterministic forecasts are more informative and reliable. This situation is even worsened by climate change projections, which add other degrees of uncertainty into the picture. Therefore, the need emerges for creating a common approach and a common language between scientists, who deal with optimization tools, probabilistic predictions and long-term projections, and operational decision makers, who must be set in the condition of understanding, accepting, and acknowledging the benefits arising from the operational management based on probabilistic predictions and projections. In this work aim at explaining the terms of the problem and the rationale for explaining and involving decision-makers with the final objective of using probabilistic predictions/projections in their decision-making process.

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